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Concierge.com

Bangkok Hotels

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Chakrabongse House
396 Maharaj Road
Tatien
Bangkok
Thailand 10200
Tel: 66 2 622 1900
reservation@thaivillas.com
www.thaivillas.com

This little-known waterside oasis hides in plain sight among Bangkok's top tourist attractions such as the Grand Palace and Wat Pho. The accommodations are housed in three traditional Thai houses, constructed up-country then brought to the Chao Phraya riverbank for HRH Prince Chakrabongse in 1908. His heirs have lovingly maintained the buildings, making them comfortable for modern travelers with ornate beds piled with silk cushions, sparkling floors, and refined Thai details throughout. Each suite has a spacious balcony overlooking the well-tended tropical garden and the river. The Riverside Villa even boasts an unobstructed view of Wat Arun ("Temple of the Dawn") from the bedroom. Tall palms and tropical flowers encircle the swimming pool and there is a riverfront sala where scrumptious Thai meals are served upon request. A private tuk-tuk takes guests sightseeing around the old Rattanakosin quarter, and a motorized boat is available at the private pier. But don't expect typical hotel accoutrements here: Instead of business centers, plasma televisions, and concierges, you'll get smiling service that's more personal and less rushed.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Dream Hotel
10 Sukhumvit Soi 15
Klongtoey Nua, Wattana
Bangkok
Thailand
Tel: 660 2 254 8500
dreambkk.com

The new outpost of Dream Hotel is a five-minute walk from both the subway and the Skytrain in Bangkok's central Sukhumvit district. Owner and society page regular Vikram Chatwal calls his New York–based boutique hotel brand Hautel Couture, though the Thai translation feels decidedly more casual than catwalk. Appropriately for a hotel whose name promises heavenly slumber, the emphasis in the 100 sleek white-walled rooms is the custom platform bed, which comes blanketed in layers of allergen-free goose down. A compact gym and a serviceable spa round out the standard amenities here, but ample desks and speedy free Wi-Fi sets the hotel above many bigger and better known competitors in the business sector. Comfort foods like pad thai have been early standouts among the fusion fare at Flava, but the recent arrival of young chef Daniel Roland Meier promises more refined dishes on the horizon.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Eugenia
267 Sukhumvit Road
Soi 31
North Klongtan, Wattana
Bangkok
Thailand 10110
Tel: 66 2 259 9011
reservations@theeugenia.com
www.theeugenia.com

From the vintage cars that can pick you up at the airport to the handbeaten copper tubs in each bathroom, Old Siam elegance permeates this colornial-style 12-room gem. The Taiwanese owner generously filled all three floors with more than 300 of his personal antiques, including a fully intact crocodile skin that inhabits the second-story landing. Bangkoks most romantic beds—four-poster and covered in crisp Belgian linens—are the centerpiece of the spacious suites. Snag room 302 for the best views of the pool and palms. Thoughtful complimentary conveniences like the minibar, Wi-Fi access, and even international phone calls make this a homey alternative to larger luxury hotels like the nearby Sukhothai and Four Seasons Bangkok. Trendsetting locals snuggle among the overstuffed couches and daybeds in Zheng He Lounge's warren of intimate rooms while the smiling bow-tied waiters serves European cheeses and charcuterie. A celadon-tiled courtyard pool has an old-world elegance and the traditional Thai sala offers the perfect spot for yoga or meditation.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Four Seasons Bangkok
155 Rajdamri Road
Bangkok
Thailand 10330
Tel: 66 2 250 1000
reservations.bangkok@fourseasons.com
www.fourseasons.com/bangkok

Only the Sukhothai can come close to vying with the Four Seasons for the position of most luxurious in a city known for its ultraluxe lodgings. Even standard accommodations here start at a roomy 430 square feet, among the biggest in the city, and you'll find a mix of graceful teak furniture and cheery Thai silks, along with high-tech perks like 42-inch plasmas and Wi-Fi. The cabana rooms overlooking an inviting outdoor swimming pool and traditional lotus pond offer a sylvan escape from the city's frenetic pace. The elegant lobby is an equally civilized space where well-dressed guests and local businesspeople meet for tea or predinner cocktails to a soundtrack of live jazz and clinking crystal. On-site restaurants include the Spice Market, one of the best places in the city for high-end Thai food, and the more casual Shintaro, which serves healthy takes on Japanese fare. First-time visitors to Bangkok might want to opt for the Four Seasons for its ability to offer a taste of home while still incorporating distinctly Thai elements into nearly every facet of your stay. It's also an excellent pick if you plan to visit the chain's properties in Chiang Mai, the Golden Triangle, or Koh Samui, as staff will take care of transferring your baggage, confirming flights, and more. Traveling with the family? Bangkok-reared Zachary Kypfer, the 14-year-old teen concierge, can give you suggestions for kid-friendly activities.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Grand Hyatt Erawan Bangkok
494 Rajdamri Road
Bangkok
Thailand 10330
Tel: 66 2 254 1234
reservation.ghbangkok@hyattintl.com
www.bangkok.grand.hyatt.com

This 380-room hotel benefits from the good karma of its next-door neighbor, the much-revered Erawan Shrine. The four-story atrium lobby can feel frenetic on busy days but even standard guest rooms—quite spacious at 430 square feet—have a relaxing vibe thanks to coconut-shell headboards and extra-fluffy duvets. In-room Wi-Fi, still a rarity among Asia's large business hotels, is among the fastest in Bangkok. Higher-level rooms include use of the Club Lounge with its views of Lumpini Park and the racetrack. But one of the top reasons to stay here is the I.Sawan spa tucked away from the noise of Bangkok among the gardens on the hotel's fifth floor. Designed by starchitect Tony Chi, the 75,000-square-foot facility has nine treatment bungalows, a hair salon, nail bar, and free-form swimming pool. For true indulgence, you can book your entire stay in one of six sprawling cottages, with en suite treatment options and fridges stocked with fresh fruit juices and organic snacks. Those who prefer more gustatorial indulgence can get their fill at the eight on-site restaurants, including the Erawan Tea Room, whose signature chocolate-banana mud pie complements an authentic Thai menu served in an old-world colonial setting.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
JW Marriott Hotel Bangkok
4 Sukhumvit Road
Soi 2
Bangkok
Thailand 10110
Tel: 66 2 656 7700
res.jwthailand@marriotthotels.com
www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/bkkdt-jw-marriott-hotel-bangkok

The JW Marriott is by far the best value in Bangkok. Rates as low as $200 a night will buy you one of the 441 richly paneled guest rooms with high-tech toys like the Remote Jack Pack—which interconnects MP3 players, digital cameras, and laptops to a 32-inch flat-screen television—as well as a team of IT concierges to guide you through the process. Even better is the prime Sukhumvit location along Bangkok's Skytrain, particularly important as bell staff sometimes fail to assist non-Thai speakers in communicating addresses to cabdrivers. The rest of the service, however, proves impeccable. The 24-hour business center capably handles everything from faxing to locating an attorney. Friendly concierges go out of their way to arrange tours and dinner reservations. Those homesick for American fare can dine at the on-site New York Steakhouse, or grab breakfast at the Bangkok Baking Company, which is rightly famous for its fluffy croissants and homemade chocolate truffles. The plush lounge chairs at the outdoor swimming pool are an ideal place to unwind after a day of sightseeing, as is the on-site spa.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Le Méridien Bangkok
40/5 Surawong Road
Bangrak
Bangkok
Thailand 10500
Tel: 66 2 232 8888
www.starwoodhotels.com/lemeridien/property/overview/index.html?propertyID=1946

Le Méridien's recent efforts to integrate culture into its urban hotels proved worthwhile at this tower in Bangkok's Silom neighborhood. One dramatic feat: the superimposing of Ralph Gibson's quirky 1960s photograph Man with Poodle onto the hotel's double-height glass entrance. Room keys also serve as complimentary passes to the Thailand Creative & Design Center, a cutting-edge art space and library. Dark-wood finishes, etched mirrors, and a space-optimizing bathroom create a modern ambience in the 282 rooms, though the beds don't feel as plush as they look. Thai sculptures as well as floor-to-ceiling windows that overlook gilded Buddhist temple spires add just the right indigenous touch. Room service includes better-than-usual breakfast dishes (think goat cheese Gruyère custard and buckwheat crÍpes). Be sure to check out Bamboo Chic, the stark floor-lit lounge serving noodles and sushi.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Mandarin Oriental, Bangkok
48 Oriental Avenue
Bangrak
Bangkok
Thailand 10500
Tel: 66 2 659 9000
mobkk-reservations@mohg.com
www.mandarinoriental.com/bangkok/

Mandarin Oriental, Bangkok, is one of the oldest deluxe hotels in Bangkok, serving the rich and famous (Princess Diana, Nicolas Cage, and Elizabeth Taylor have all rested their heads here) for more than 130 years. Yet it's completely up to date and right next to the Skytrain. Its 358 rooms and 35 suites feature such chichi luxuries as private butler service and Bose CD players, and all rooms have at least side river views. The furniture is swathed in Thai silks and backed by burnished teak—except in the Garden Wing rooms where the style is neo-colonial. For champagne wishes and literary dreams, there's the Somerset Maugham suite, with sultry four-poster beds, gold-legged stools, and fuchsia pillows. The hotel also houses some of Bangkok's finest restaurants, including Lord Jim's, where seafood is served riverside, and the more formal Le Normandie, where both the service and menu are high French. For diners having a Western jones, there's a wood-fired Italian pizza oven and an outdoor barbecue joint on a terrace by the river (closed from May to September for the rainy season). In November 2006, the Ayurvedic Penthouse spa debuted with classical treatments like Udwatanam, a rejuvenating dry herbal massage. There's also a terrific cooking school.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Metropolitan Bangkok
27 South Sathorn Road
Sathorn
Bangkok
Thailand 10120
Tel: 800 223 6800
Tel: 66 2 625 3333
res.bkk@metropolitan.como.bz
www.metropolitan.como.bz

Not far from the Skytrain and subway, the Metropolitan, sister to the ultrahip London hotel, strives to be the epitome of modernism, with its Mies van der Rohe–style façade and staff dressed in black and white Comme des Garçons uniforms. Once in the lobby—all cream and dark Makha wood—the sequenced mood lighting establishes the theatrical ambience. The 171 bedrooms avoid obvious Asian references in favor of clean lines, natural lighting, stone bathrooms, and handwoven Thai silk curtains. High speed Internet, flat-screen TVs, DVD players, and (naturally) yoga mats are all included, as well as the occasional artistic flourish by local up-and-comer Natee Utarit. Michelin-starred chef David Thompson serves authentic Thai curries and kanom jeen at Nahm, while over at the Met Bar, the DJs compete with the martini mixologists for the attention of stylish guests. A different West-reinterprets-East vibe reigns at Glow, a second restaurant where the menu is organic and mainly raw, and at Como Shambhala, a holistic spa that offers aromatherapy and reflexology treatments, urban retreat packages, a yoga center, a lap pool, and steam rooms.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Old Bangkok Inn
607 Pra Sumen Road
Pra Nakhon
Bangkok
Thailand 10200
Tel: 66 2 629 1787
info@oldbangkokinn.com
www.oldbangkokinn.com

A bit of Vermont in the shadow of the Grand Palace? Nantiya Tuliyanont, the friendly, globe-trotting owner of Bangkok's first true B&B, welcomes arriving guests with homemade sweets, and the eight rooms each have their own thoughtful details—a private garden with hand-sculpted tub in the Rose suite, intricate wrought-iron fixtures in the Rice room. But this is no throwback: There are flat-screen TVs, powerful showers with solar-heated water, and free Wi-Fi and computers in each room (something the inn's more luxurious competitors don't provide). But the key here is the personal touch: Breakfast—rice-flour hotcakes doused in sweet coconut—is made on an old-fashioned charcoal stove, and Jirayu "Joey" Tuliyanont will personally escort you on a nightlife tour of nearby hippie-chic Khao San Road. One of the few green hotels in Bangkok, the inn has sensors that shut down lights and appliances when guests leave their rooms, and all water is heated with solar energy. The owners share this sense of social responsibility with guests, offering them the opportunity on their bill to make contributions (matched by the hotel) to one of four charities focused on animals and children at risk.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Peninsula Bangkok
333 Charoennakorn Road
Klongsan
Bangkok
Thailand 10600
Tel: 866 382 8388
Tel: 66 2 861 2888
pbk@peninsula.com
bangkok.peninsula.com

Another of Bangkok's riverside bastions of luxury, this Peninsula stares down its rivals—the Shangri-La and the Oriental—across the Chao Phraya from the Thonburi side. Of course, that's the Peninsula's one drawback: everything worth seeing in Bangkok lies on the other side of the river. The hotel makes up for this failing by outstripping the Oriental in sheer style (that, and ferrying guests across the river all day from 6 a.m. until midnight, a lovely way to commute). It's also not far from the Skytrain. It was designed so that all 370 rooms and suites get the coveted water view, especially valuable at night when the city skyline is lit up. The spacious rooms have a distinctly Asian flair, right down to the contemporary art. Even the least expensive rooms have teak foyers, silk-covered walls, and marble bathrooms kitted out with mod fixtures and TVs. The 2006 addition of a spa gives guests the option of Thai, European and Ayurvedic-inspired treatments. Among the five restaurants, Jesters is tops for food—haute Pacific Rim (think wild Australian crocodile served up ceviche-style)—but its modern style can't hold a candle to the ambience of Thiptara, where guests enjoy traditional, home-style Thai dishes like grilled prawns dipped in tamarind sauce under salas (traditional, open-air, pagodalike teak structures) with live khim music in the background.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Seven Hotel
3/15 Sukhumvit 31
Bangkok
Thailand 10110
Tel: 662 662 0951
info@sleepatseven.com
www.sleepatseven.com

The Thai capital is awash in hotels of all shapes and sizes, but tucked into a cul-de-sac off Sukhumvit Road, this town house turned B&B will satisfy hotel-design fans, with original Asian-themed wall graffiti in each of the six guest rooms and polished salvaged-wood floors. Guests cross over a ruby-red-bottom koi pond on weathered planks to take refuge from Bangkok's heat-soaked days inside the lobby lounge. The indefatigable staff are ever on hand to help with luggage, arrange around-the-clock wake-up calls, and suggest the neighborhood's best dining options. All guest rooms have flat-screen TVs with DVD players, iPod docks, AC, soft cotton robes, high-thread-count bed linens, and offer great value: Room rates include local calls and the complimentary use of a mobile phone. Every guest can access the panoramic rooftop as well as a mezzanine patio strewn with puffy cushions.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Shangri-La Hotel, Bangkok
89 Soi Wat Suan Plu New Road
Bangrak
Bangkok
Thailand 10500
Tel: 866 565 5050
Tel: 66 2 236 7777
slbk@shangri-la.com
www.shangri-la.com/en/property/bangkok/shangrila

Stretched out along the banks of the Chao Phraya River with easy Skytrain access, the Shangri-La ranks among the world's top luxury hotels. The decor is mostly modern, though there are some nods to old-school Asia in the wall art and standing sculptures. Of the 799 rooms, those in the posh Krungthep Wing, with balconies overlooking tropical gardens and the river, are on average larger than ones in the Shangri-La Wing. Guests in this exclusive part of the hotel also enjoy extras like 24-hour butler service, complimentary pressing (two garments per guest), and evening cocktails and canapés delivered to their door nightly. Facilities include two pools, outdoor tennis and squash courts, a health club and the recently expanded Chi spa offering Thai massage and holistic healing. Among the multiple cafés and restaurants—specializing variously in Chinese, Italian, Japanese, and international cuisines—Salathip stands out for its traditional Thai food served in a little house by the river. Try the Yam Som-O, a typical Thai creation of shredded chicken, pomelo, and water chestnuts that chef Sumalee Boon-ek sprinkles with grated coconut and lime juice and serves in a Pomelo shell.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Siam Kempinski Hotel Bangkok
991/9 Rama 1 Road
Patumwan
Bangkok
Thailand 10330
Tel: 66†2162 9000 ††
sales.siambangkok@kempinski.com
www.kempinski.com/en/bangkok/Pages/Welcome.aspx

It could have been another soulless corporate addition to the commercial hotel market, but in spite of its size and block architecture, this contemporary high-rise skillfully evokes an authentic sense of Thailand. A handful of heroics set it apart, including the modern art program, which stocks the hotel with 1,500 paintings, sculptures, and bewitching collages by local artists. All 303 rooms face the courtyard's palm gardens and free-form pools, screening guests from the city's hum. Walls are decorated in padded Thai silk, some with gilded accent panels depicting rural life and lotus flower designs, and rooms are wired for video on demand, Internet radio, and iPod connectivity. The seventh-floor spa is a haven of Asian wellness with natural herbal products, while a well-appointed gym has killer cityscape views. The hotel's crowning glory is the restaurant Sra Bua, by Danish chef Henrik Yde-Andersen, who scored a Michelin star for his molecular Thai cooking in Copenhagen. The dishes are undoubtedly Thai but highly experimental; don't miss the gang dang, a frozen red curry with lobster salad (better than it sounds). The hotel is already popular with the Asian business set, but leisure travelers will be equally well served here, not least for the unbeatable downtown location beside Siam Paragon, the city's finest shopping mall.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Sukhothai
13/3 South Sathorn Road
Sathorn
Bangkok
Thailand 10120
Tel: 66 2 344 8888
info@sukhothai.com
www.sukhothai.com

"Sukhothai" means "dawn of happiness," and the Sukhothai period (1238–1376) was the golden age of Thai art and architecture. The Zen atmosphere at this refined 210-room hotel draws on both definition and history. Low pavilions, designed in a clean, angular style that would have impressed the staunchest Bauhaus devotees, are separated by pools with lotus flowers floating on the surface and tropical gardens. Accommodations are equally tranquil with Thai silk fabrics in airy silvers, golds and greens, teak paneling, and huge mirrored bathrooms. All 82 suites are technologically tricked-out with iPod connections, Wi-Fi, and flat-screen LCD TV's. The hotel's well-regarded Celadon restaurant specializes in Thai cuisine, like Yam Huaplee, a banana blossom salad that the chef tosses with poached prawns and serves with a side of jasmine rice. In 2006, designer Ed Tuttle came back to give the Colonnade restaurant, known for its international and Asian cuisine, a modern facelift with high ceilings, smooth lines, and large windows overlooking a shallow pool with stupas. There are also international and Italian restaurants on-site and the Lumpini station subway is within walking distance.

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.