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Concierge.com

Brooklyn Nightlife

Hotel Photo
Bembe
81 S. Sixth Street
Williamsburg
Brooklyn , New York
11211
Tel: 718 387 5389
Subway: J train to Marcy Avenue
www.bembe.us

A happy, multiculti crowd bucks the standard rocker-dive trend at this lounge in the shadow of the Williamsburg Bridge. The interior, created almost entirely from aged hardwood salvaged throughout the city, strives to be "familiar to many people and their respective cultures," with global accents such as Cuban portraits and Colombian burlap coffee bags. Inclusiveness pays off in a borough as diverse as this: Each night, many single women looking for a dance partner pack the house for beats ranging from Afro-Cuban salsa to roots and reggae. A cask of watermelon rum punch and other fruit-based cocktails keep the party going, and conga drums are often at patrons' disposal (be warned, it's a bit of a democracy). And that high-pitched maraca? That's the bartender nailing a screw into a coconut so she can dump its milk (and perhaps some rum) over ice.

Open daily from 7:30 pm to 4 am.

Brooklyn Social
335 Smith Street
Carroll Gardens
Brooklyn , New York
11231
Tel: 718 858 7758
Subway: F train to Carroll Street
www.brooklynsocialbar.com

No password is required to enter Brooklyn Social, once a members-only Sicilian men's club. But once inside, you get the feeling that the young professionals who have invaded the old Italian neighborhood of Carroll Gardens consider the bar their private meeting ground. Regulars huddle up against the long counter, chatting with the bartender over a Peroni, or sit out back in the stone-tiled patio enclosed by a vine-covered green fence. In keeping with the joint's roots, the jukebox has a '50s and '60s selection of Motown and Frank Sinatra tunes, the muddled-fruit cocktails are branded with names like Amalfi and Palermo, and the wine list is exclusively Sicilian. Be sure to raise a glass of grappa to the original members of the Società Riposto, whose framed photos and painted portraits grace the walls.—Douglas Wright

Open Sundays through Thursdays 4 pm to 2 am, Fridays and Saturdays 4 pm to 4 am.

Clover Club
210 Smith Street
Cobble Hill
Brooklyn , New York
11201
Tel: 718 855 7939
Subway: F train to Bergen Street
www.cloverclubny.com

Mixologist Julie Reiner, co-owner of Pegu Club in Soho, brings her tested formula for a classic cocktail spot to Cobble Hill. The Clover Club is a wood-paneled lounge named after the Philadelphia journalists' organization so renowned for its drinking habits that it inspired a namesake libation. The centerpiece is an 18th-century miners' bar transplanted from Virginia; there's ample space for dining on oysters on the half shell and steak tartare at the wooden tables out front, and a sunken living room in back is perfect for lounging on couches. The leather-clad menu has long-winded descriptions and lengthy lists of sours, swizzles, Collinses, and fizzes—if you can't decide, the skilled bartenders will simply whip you up something tailored to your likes, cracking the ice, mixing those liquors and mystery nectars, adding perhaps a wisp of egg white for a foamy finish, and shaking out some of the tastiest cocktails this side of the East River.—Douglas Wright

Open Mondays through Thursdays 11 am to 2 am, Fridays and Saturdays 11 am to 4 am, and Sundays 11 am to 12:30 am.

D.O.C Wine Bar
83 N. Seventh Street
Williamsburg
Brooklyn , New York
11211
Tel: 718 963 1925
Subway: L train to Bedford Avenue
www.docwinebar.com

D.O.C. (Denominazione di Origine Controllata) is a quality assurance label of sorts for Italian wines, and this namesake neo-rustic enoteca in Williamsburg takes similar care in choosing varietal blends that make the grade. Sardinia is a well-represented region on the list—the blackberry-nosed Perdera Monica di Sardegna and the Sella e Mosca are both pleasant quaffs. Better still, many wines are sold by the marzianetto (tasting shot), so you can attend to gaps in your knowledge of Sardinian vintages quickly. Rough-hewn woodblock tables and plank floors strike a casual tone, and the bar area becomes home to a lively, air-kissing scene as the evening progresses. There's a small plate selection to absorb the sulfites—crostini with pâté and goat cheese, for example, or a tagliere spread of Italian meats and cheeses—all delivered with a charming "Salute!"

Open Monday through Thursday 6 pm to midnight; Friday and Saturday 6 pm to 1 am.

Hotel Delmano
82 Berry Street
Williamsburg
Brooklyn , New York
11211
Tel: 718 387 1945
Subway: L train to Bedford Avenue

Don't let the fogged-glass windows and locked accordion gate in front of this Williamsburg speakeasy fool you. Slide around to the side entrance and you'll find the Hotel Delmano's leather booths packed with neighborhood hipsters and in-the-know Manhattanites supping potent cocktails with names like Devil's Garden. Roughly translated from the Spanish "of hands," Delmano is furnished with pieces handcrafted by its artist owners, from the curved marble bar to the custom-built tables and cut-stone tiles in the bathroom. The overall aesthetic? Rive Gauche meets 1950s Havana. Grab a wooden stool at the bar for a front-row view of the black-aproned bartenders who craft their cocktails with the patience of an apothecary. Arrive early in the evening if you want a seat on Friday or Saturday night—the lounge is exclusively first-come, first-serve.—Douglas Wright

Open Sundays through Thursdays 5 pm to 2 am, Fridays and Saturdays 5 pm to 3 am.

Larry Lawrence
295 Grand Street
Williamsburg
Brooklyn , New York
11211
Tel: 718 218 7866
Subway: L train to Lorimer Street
www.larrylawrencebar.com

It's probably best that the door here isn't clearly marked, or this watering hole on a happening stretch of Grand Street would undoubtedly be overrun. (Hint: look for the word "bar" in tiny red letters outside a discreet metal entryway). The interior alone is worth a peek, having already found its way into coffee-table books on emerging New York City architecture. There's rich-hued woodwork with clean, Scandinavian lines and an elevated, glass-encased smoking mezzanine reached via a loft like stairwell. LL isn't particularly known for signature cocktails (it's something of an unspoken rule not to order cosmos in this part of Brooklyn anyway), but Brooklyn Lager and Hoegaarden are poured by reasonably cheerful bartenders whose iPod selection could very well be the topic of conversation on blogs the next day.

Open daily from 6 pm to 4 am.

Spuyten Duyvil
359 Metropolitan Avenue
Williamsburg
Brooklyn , New York
11211
Tel: 718 963 4140
Subway: L train to Bedford Avenue
www.spuytenduyvilnyc.com

Ask the bartenders at Williamsburg's Spuyten Duyvil about the obscure artisanal draughts with umlauted names scrawled on the chalkboards, and along with an accurate description of the taste, you'll probably get a rambling story about its brewing history, the difference between Lambics and Wallonian ales, and so on. In fact, it's nearly impossible to escape an education at Spuyten Duyvil, with its world maps, scientific charts of the human anatomy, and classroom desks where locals sip glasses of La Choulette Framboise or Kulmbacher Eisbock. The narrow bar gets crowded fast on a Friday or Saturday night, so slip out back to the tree-lined garden patio, one of the best in the neighborhood.—Douglas Wright

Open Mondays through Fridays at 5 pm, Saturdays and Sundays at 1 pm.

Williamsburg Music Hall
66 N. Sixth Street
Williamsburg
Brooklyn , New York
11211
Tel: 718 486 5400
Subway: L train to Bedford Avenue
www.musichallofwilliamsburg.com

When this venerable music venue's former incarnation, Northsix, opened in 2001, it heralded an explosive new era of grassroots indie rock in Brooklyn, drawing in promising neighborhood talents such as TV on the Radio, Beirut, and the Hold Steady. When rents skyrocketed in Williamsburg six years later, the Northsix space was bought by the owners of the Bowery Ballroom and remodeled with state-of-the-art sound equipment, balcony seating, and improved acoustics. Recent acts like MGMT, Grizzly Bear, and the Dirty Projectors have since unleashed a rocking wallop of sound into the modest-size, black-walled venue, which continues in Northsix's footsteps by showcasing indie rock bands on the rise. If you arrive before the show, head downstairs to the subterranean horseshoe bar (one of four on the premises), where band members often grab a drink before going onstage.—Douglas Wright

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.