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Brussels Hotels

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Brussels Welcome Hotel
5 Rue du Peuplier
Brussels
Belgium 1000
Tel: 32 2 219 9546
info@hotelwelcome.com
www.hotelwelcome.com

The blandest of names gives entirely the wrong impression of this 17-room gem in the Lower City's cute, cobblestoned Sainte-Catherine district. The labor of love of owner-proprietors Michel and Sophie Smeesters, the pristine three-story corner house is a little fantasy world—and "world" is the right word, because each room whimsically interprets a different destination: Bali, China, Tibet, the Congo, Morocco, Kenya, India, Japan, Thailand… And those Smeesters have style! This is no cheesy conceit. Instead, it's the kind of place you need to book half a year ahead because of its returning fans—many of whom still mourn the adjacent restaurant, La Truite d'Argent, which the Smeesters closed in 2003 to concentrate on the hotel. Or maybe they're too busy ferrying guests to and from the airport—their transfer service is a good deal.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Dominican
9 Rue Léopold/Leopoldstraat
Brussels
Belgium 1000
Tel: 32 2 203 08 08
www.dominican.be

With a terrific location on a quiet street near the Grand Place, the 150-room Dominican takes its design cues from the fifteenth-century abbey that originally occupied the site. The award-winning Dutch firm FG stijl used jewel-tone colors to evoke medieval stained glass, a motif repeated in the carpeting of the guest rooms. Ecclesiastical references aside, this is a new property that was built behind the nineteenth-century stone facade of a building which was once the home of the French neoclassical painter Jacques-Louis David. Soaring ceilings distinguish the handsome bar, restaurant, and lobby that surround the central atrium. Though standard rooms are compact, they're well designed and flush with useful amenities, such as a Nespresso machine, free Internet access, and a plasma-screen television on an adjustable arm that enables viewing from anywhere in the room. Down pillows and a two-inch-thick mattress pad ensure sweet dreams, and striking bathrooms have black granite sinks and spacious walk-in showers with ceiling-mounted showerheads.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hotel Amigo
Rue de l'Amigo 1-3
Brussels
Belgium
Tel: 32 2 547 4747
www.hotelamigo.com

Without a doubt, this refurbished 174-room hotel off the Grand'Place is the most glamorous in town. It's part of the small, silky Rocco Forte Hotels group and features the classical references, modern colors, luxe finishes, and witty details that characterize all 11 hotels. Here are leathers, linens, and velvets in mole gray, wine red, taupe, and chartreuse; angular dark-wood furniture; pure linen sheeting; and red- or green-marble bathrooms with art by the Belgian comics creator Hergé—i.e., prints of Tintin, Snowy, and Captain Haddock. The restaurant, Bocconi, is one of Brussels's rare modern Italians and a destination in itself (a typical dish would be Monkfish with asparagus and pesto).

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hôtel Métropole
31 Place de Brouckère
Brussels
Belgium 1000
Tel: 32 2 217 2300
info@metropolehotel.be
www.metropolehotel.be

A robust and blowsy dowager duchess of a hotel, this 298-room Victorian has seen continuous service since 1895—amazingly, it's the only 19th-century survivor in the city. The higher-grade rooms are worth the extra splurge (which is not too huge, especially if booked through the Web site), since the "medium" rooms have faded a little too far beyond the charming level. A Louis XIV–style "privilege" room facing the Place de Brouckère is a good bet. The vast scale and fusty decor are anachronistic pleasures, if you're tuned to that pitch. It's very central, next to the Place de la Monnaie.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Monty Small Design Hotel
101 Boulevard Brand Whitlock
Brussels
Belgium 1200
Tel: 32 2 734 5636
Fax: 32 2 734 5636
info@monty-hotel.be
www.monty-hotel.be

This 18-room hotel aims to furnish traditional spaces in contemporary styles. Aficionados can have fun identifying big-name pieces: Ron Arad, Charles Eames, Ingo Maurer, Philippe Starck et al. are represented in furniture and fittings—and very handsome it all looks against the blue-gray walls and cranberry woodwork. Aside from said furniture and fittings, facilities are modest, though there's a comprehensive buffet breakfast (which you can take in the garden on fine days) and limited room service. The location could be either a drawback or a plus: It's in the southeast EU lands, nestled between the Quartier Léopold, and Parc du Cinquantenaire, en route to Tervuren—but if you're not here on Eurobusiness, there's a Métro on the doorstep to effect your escape.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Sofitel Brussels Europe
Place Jourdan 1
Brussels
Belgium
Tel: 32 2 235 5100
www.sofitel.com

The location of this sleek 149-room property—one block from Berlaymont, the headquarters of the European Commission—contributes to its cosmopolitan feel, with Eurocrats descending there for lunch at Spud's, the haute restaurant run by Parisian chef Alain Senderens. Just off the spare atrium lobby, a library with velvet armchairs and print sofas makes for an intimate nook; the basement workout room uses the cantilevered windows of the atrium as a fountain, with water spilling over the glass outside; and hammams have direct elevator access from rooms upstairs. Rooms, decked out with gliding panel curtains, also come with an espresso machine and TV channels from every EU country.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Tenbosch House
131-133 Rue Washington
Brussels
Belgium 1050
Tel: 32 2888 90 90
info@tenboschhouse.com
www.tenboschhouse.com

Created from two brick-and-granite-fronted nineteenth-century houses in the silk-stocking Ixelles district, far from the madding crowds around the Grand Place, the exquisitely designed seven-room Tenbosch instantly became the capital's trendiest small hotel. In the soaring all-white lobby, the walls are covered with art and photography from several of the city's leading galleries. The bar, the lounge, and the breakfast room serve up an offbeat but fabulous grand slam of sixties Scandinavian furniture and fittings, a mixture of original pieces and contemporary editions. Every room is individually decorated, and all of them are large and light with high ceilings and the same retro-groovy style, plus huge bathrooms. There's a large garden with a terrace out back, as well as an indoor pool and sauna. Tenbosch House is run by Nadia Ashdjian, a friendly local arts enthusiast, and all told, it offers a much more intimate experience than staying at a traditional hotel, no matter how luxurious.

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.