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Dubrovnik Hotels

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Dubrovnik Palace Hotel
Masarykov put 20
Dubrovnik
Croatia
Tel: 385 20 430 287
Tel: 385 20 430 000
info@dubrovnikpalace.hr
www.dubrovnikpalace.hr

With a $50 million renovation and a spring 2004 ceremonial opening by the president, this small village of a hotel (and don't forget the Conference Centre and Spa) was Croatia's largest single tourism project in 30 years. Surrounded by pines and fronting the Adriatic on the Lapad Peninsula a couple of miles outside the Old City, the ten-story building is no thing of beauty, but who cares when the design (with its bulging front and setbacks) allows for all 308 rooms to have a private, full-sea-view balcony? Said rooms involve much teak-finish wood and earthy tones, and they have flat-screen satellite TVs with broadband Internet access and pay movies. There are three outdoor pools (one for children) and an indoor one, several cliff beaches, a tennis court, and what is claimed (with good reason) to be Croatia's best and biggest spa. Add four restaurants, a nightclub, four bars, a kids' club, and, in summer, boat service to the old port of Dubrovnik directly from the hotel quay, and you have a good deal. Of course, the gigantic conference center could interfere with your peace, but it doesn't seem to have bothered anyone very much—reports from here are uniformly enthusiastic.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Grand Villa Argentina
Frana Supila 14
Dubrovnik
Croatia
Tel: 385 20 440 555
sales@gva.hr
www.gva.hr

Inside Old Town, you rarely see the sea, and it's hard to grasp the fortified walls' dramatic immensity. Which brings us to the Grand Villa Argentina: a very good hotel with an even better location (just outside the walls on coastal cliffs that tumble into the ocean). It's an Old World, classy sort of place, where the courteous attendants meet the demands of their sophisticated, moneyed clientele. While the overstuffed-armchair-and-heavy-curtain ambience isn't exactly design-inspired, it is unfailingly comfortable—especially pleasant if you've been traveling around the islands, where comfort is barely an afterthought. (You'll take the lumpy double bed and like it.) Ask for a room with a sea view—if you can't see the water and the walls, what's the point? And if you've been looking for a splurge-worthy room, we recommend staying in one of the four villas, separate from the main hotel—Suite 914 at Villa Orsula has its own balcony. Or, to the tune of 6,000 euros a day (it does hold ten guests in five bedrooms), the Villa Sheherezade: a Moroccan-style building built in 1939 by a Latvian banker for his belly-dancing lover, complete with banquet hall, a private dock for small boats, butler, and beach attendants.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hilton Imperial Dubrovnik
Marijana Blazica 2
Dubrovnik
Croatia
Tel: 385 20 320 320
Fax: 385 20 320 220
www.dubrovnik.hilton.com

It was a red-letter day in May 2005 when the early-19th-century Hotel Imperial was reopened, no matter who was responsible for its renovation. And thankfully, the friendly folks at Hilton have not erased the charms of this majestic landmark. The 147 rooms (of which eight are suites), done in a predominantly orange color scheme, with orangey wood everywhere and marble bathrooms, overlook the tropical gardens or Dubrovnik's rooftops, with a sea view from the best. Only suites and executive rooms have balconies or terraces. There's a restaurant and a lobby bar, a fitness center with sauna and steam bath and an indoor pool, plus a VIP lounge for guests staying in executive-level rooms.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Bellevue
7 Pera Cingrije
Dubrovnik
Croatia 20000
Tel: 385 20 330 000
welcome@hotel-bellevue.hr
www.hotel-bellevue.hr

The Bellevue, which opened in 2006, lives up to its name: Each of the 93 rooms has a view of the Adriatic. Though it's more middle-of-the-road than luxury (like many hotels here, the service can be indifferent at best), the rooms are airy and cleanly designed in calming sand and earth tones with rustic natural fabrics. All of the rooms have gigantic windows, of course, and all but the standard rooms have balconies—it's worth upgrading to a superior. The Bellevue's private beach, screening room, and spa attract a clued-in clientele—mostly couples popping over from Paris or London for the weekend and young Americans spending a couple of nights on their way up the Dalmatian Coast. And it's just a 15-minute walk from the Pile Gate, keeping you removed from the hustle and noise of Old Town while still being within walking distance.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hotel Uvala
Masarykov put 6
Dubrovnik
Croatia
Tel: 385 20 433 580
uvala@hotelimaestral.com
www.hotelimaestral.com

This is the newest (2003) and most dramatic project from a hotel chain called Maestral with ambitions to revolutionize the Croatian resort scene. Don't worry, they're working on the boutique scale—so far there are five small hotels, and they're all along this same road in Lapad. This one was reconstructed from a blah four-story 1967 hotel by Split architect Dinko Kovacic, who has done wonders—it's as if he'd superimposed the Pompidou Center onto a Greek village. The 51 rooms with nice amenities (robe and slippers, individual AC, satellite TV, etc.) are plain and white-walled, with salmon-pink drapes and moss-green carpets; the best have balconies with a great view over the bay. A wellness center with saunas, Turkish bath, and two pools debuted in 2004—which is perhaps why the Mantala restaurant offers macrobiotic menus alongside its Dalmatian rump roast and deep-fried shark.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Pucic Palace
Ulica Od Puca 1
Dubrovnik
Croatia
Tel: 385 20 326 222
reservations@thepucicpalace.com
www.thepucicpalace.com

Opposite Gundulic Square, this 18th-century stone-and-marble Baroque mini-palace is the only deluxe hotel in the Old Town. And it is indeed very deluxe, with its columns and arches, high-beamed ceilings, dark oak parquet floors, and antique furniture. The 19 rooms are stuffed with amenities you can't take for granted round here—satellite TV, DVD player, CD and DVD libraries, minibar, individual AC, Bulgari products, loofahs, robes, and slippers in the bathrooms—and there's 24-hour room service plus two cars and a yacht you can charter for picnics and trips. A brasserie called Café Royal has a terrace on Gundulic Square, and there's another restaurant plus a wine bar. You'll have to live without a gym and pool, but the private beach is just a ten-minute stroll away. The only problem with Pucić Palace is that the rates are two or three times higher than those anywhere else.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Rixos Hotel Libertas
3 Liechtensteinov put
Dubrovnik
Croatia
Tel: 385 20 200 000
libertas@rixos.com
www.rixos.com/libertas

This hotel is ingrained in the Dubrovnik landscape, both physically and culturally. The 14 floors of terraces dramatically stagger down a steep hillside toward the sea, giving hotel guests breathtaking sunrise views. And since it's right on the Adriatic and an easy 15-minute walk from Old Town, the hotel has been a standard meeting place for locals since it first opened in 1971. Oligarch-favorite Turkish hotel chain Rixos took it over in 2007, transforming the once small hotel into a luxury resort with 300 new rooms (for a total of 315), three restaurants, and five bars and cafés, one of which maintains "local" prices in an effort to keep its place in city resident's hearts. The Turkish chain also added a spa with a Turkish bath (of course), indoor and outdoor pools, and a cigar bar patterned after an English gentlemen's club that is stocked with Cuban Cohibas, Montecristos, and VSOP cognacs. (We've heard reports that this is all a bit too much for the staff to handle and leads to a flustered wait-staff and unanswered requests) The rooms themselves have a sleek, neutral design and all the amenities now de rigeur among hotels going after a high-end clientele (plasma TVs, whirlpool tubs). Though the basic rooms are small and narrow, be sure to book one with an Adriatic-view balcony positioned to capture the morning's first rays.

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.