PRINT PREVIEW
send to printer

Concierge.com

Glasgow Restaurants

Bistro at One Devonshire Gardens
1 Devonshire Gardens
West End
Glasgow
Scotland G12 0UX
Tel: 44 141 339 2001
www.hotelduvin.com/hotels/glasgow/glasgow.aspx

It's a little distance out from the city center, but this exclusive boutique hotel has a dining room that justifies the ten-minute cab ride. The Bistro name sells short a kitchen that produces top-end contemporary food under chef Darin Campbell. The dark, oak-paneled dining room has old-school charm spiked with flashes of modern bling such as the black chandeliers. The menu ranges from ballotines of foie gras and truffled hen's egg to char-grilled slabs of dry-aged steak from Donald Russell, the Queen's meat supplier.

Closed for lunch on Saturdays.

Brian Maule at Chardon d'Or
176 West Regent Street
City Center
Glasgow
Scotland G2 4RL
Tel: 44 141 248 3801
www.brianmaule.com

Glasgow foodies welcomed Scot Brian Maule with open arms when he returned back north from London to open this restaurant, but considering that he's from Ayrshire, not Glasgow, the warm reception probably had less to do with local pride than with the Michelin stars he garnered. Maule presents his French-Scottish dishes (changing every six weeks) impeccably—roasted guinea fowl topped with fried cèpes and hints of parsley, garlic, and shallots—and serves them in a Victorian dining room with high-backed leather chairs and white linen–draped tables. Lighter dishes are available during lunch.

Closed Sundays. No lunch on Saturdays.

Cafe Gandolfi
64 Albion Street
Merchant City
Glasgow
Scotland G11 NY
Tel: 44 141 552 6813
www.cafegandolfi.co.uk

Serving modern Scottish cuisine, this local favorite in the old Merchant City Cheese Market was the first place to reclaim the now-jumping neighborhood back in 1979, and it's still pulling them in enough to require adding a bar in 2002. Inside, custom-carved wood chairs are tinged with color from the stained-glass tangle of blue fish in the front window. The all-day menu runs from eggs en cocotte through sandwiches and linguine to the popular "Gandolfi Standards" (smoked venison with gratin dauphinoise, Cockburns of Dingwall haggis, and New York pastrami!). Try not to be so dazzled by the Standards that you miss the Cullen skink (a traditional smoked haddock soup), smoked mackerel pâté with oatcakes, or Stornoway black pudding with mushrooms and pancakes.

Mother India
28 Westminster Terrace
Kelvingrove
Glasgow
Scotland G3 7RU
Tel: 44 141 221 1663
www.motherindia.co.uk

Glasgow is home to a vast number of fine Indian restaurants, but even among the stiff competition, Mother India gets high marks. A small, traditional menu caters to most tastes, with dishes such as chili garlic chicken dosa, vegetable karahi, and Delhi-style lamb. When the high-ceilinged dining area and the wood-paneled space upstairs proved too small to contain the hungry masses, they added a contemporary space in the basement called…wait for it…the Cellar. Mother India has an alcohol license, but you can also BYOB.

Dinner only Mondays and Tuesdays.

Stravaigin
28 Gibson Street
West End
Glasgow
Scotland G12 8NX
Tel: 44 141 334 2665
www.stravaigin.com

This West End restaurant—run by Colin Clydesdale, whose late father, Ronnie, owned Glasgow landmark The Ubiquitous Chip—has weathered magnificently over the past decade by testing what works and developing its dishes. The result is an exemplary operation with a fun, informed staff and the kind of menu that makes every dish sound tempting. They do a venison burger and sautéed potatoes with sea salt and rosemary one week out of every month; alternatively, try their "Spice Route Curry" of the week (Indian, Thai, or Malaysian), and if you can face it, taste the haggis, which has won them a lot of praise too. If that's all too rich, take a seat at a wooden table in the street-level café (the restaurant's in an atmospheric stone-walled basement) for a pretheater or lunch prix fixe of three courses and coffee.

Two Fat Ladies
118a Blythswood Street
City Center
Glasgow
Scotland G2 4EG
Tel: 44 141 847 0088
www.twofatladies.org

Seafood from Scotland's west coast is the main draw at this small city center restaurant, where the kitchen prizes simplicity over fussy food. Hand-dived scallops come seared with Stornoway black pudding, while the monkfish is wrapped in bacon, and that's as complicated as it needs to get when the fish is this fresh. The restaurant has nothing to do with the old BBC cooking show; it's named after bingo caller's slang ("Two Fat Ladies, 88") for the address of the original branch, which is only ten minutes' walk from the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum at 88 Dumbarton Road (44-141-339-1944).

Closed daily from 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Ubiquitous Chip
12 Ashton Lane
West End
Glasgow
Scotland G12 8SG
Tel: 44 141 334 5007
www.ubiquitouschip.co.uk

When he opened The Chip in the heart of the West End way back in 1971, the late Ronnie Clydesdale was one of the earliest chefs to realize that boosting Scotland's natural produce was the key to propelling the country out of the culinary backwater it was stuck in. Almost 40 years later, every chef with ambition is similarly rigorous in naming his sourcing. At The Chip today, this means that the black-face heather-fed lamb is noted as coming from Smeaton Farm, while the rabbit accompanying the pear and pistachio sausage nibbled its last blade of grass in Dumfriesshire. If you really want to give the credit card a workout, the Chip's wine list—particularly the Bordeaux section—makes interesting reading.

West Bank
33–35 Gibson Street
West End
Glasgow
Scotland G12 8NU
Tel: 44 141 339 5969
www.theleftbank.co.uk

The West Bank is about as close as the city gets to a gastropub, and it has been causing a stir since opening in the summer of 2006. Like the clientele—a mix of students, academics, and West End hipsters—the decor has worked hard to be stylishly boho, thanks to hot design companies such as Timorous Beasties; the tabletops, for example, are made from old scaffolding planks but are paired with beautifully designed butterfly lamps. Dishes include Goan seafood curry with Malabar pickle and pullao rice, or the dark rum and chili chicken with black bean salsa. It may be a laid-back bar, but bagging a table is as tough here as at any upmarket restaurant, so book ahead at peak times.

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.