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Glasgow See And Do

Art
Glasgow
Scotland

The Burrell Collection has just over 9,000 pieces bequeathed to the city by shipping magnate Sir William Burrell in 1944. Works include Degas, Cézanne, and Rodin, plus medieval tapestries and silverwork (Pollok Country Park; 44-141-287-2550). Expanded, revamped, and reopened in 2006, the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is much loved by generations of Glaswegians and it's not hard to see why. Exhibits range from Dalí's haunting Christ of St. John of the Cross to a Spitfire buzzing over the top of a stuffed giraffe. It has all the Titian, Rembrandt, and Impressionist paintings that a serious art buff could wish for, but it wears its learning lightly and an unexpected atmosphere of fun pervades the place (Argyle St.; 44-141-276-9599).The unmissable Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA) is in a beautiful neoclassical building in the city center. It has featured work by Damien Hirst, Sarah Lucas, Grayson Perry, and Rachel Whiteread (Royal Exchange Square; 44-141-229-1996). The cutting-edge Centre for Contemporary Arts features visual art, performance, film, and music. There's also a rather excellent café-bar (350 Sauchiehall St.; 44-141-352-4900). The Sharmanka Kinetic Gallery and Theatre hosts a fascinating, eccentric show of Russian artst Eduard Bersudsky's automatons made of everything from carved wood to tiny bits of old scrap metal. Call or check the website for performance times—they need to be seen in action (103 Trongate; 44-141-552-7080). Of the scores of independent galleries, the Glasgow Print Studio (103 Trongate; 44-141-552-0704) and the Transmission Gallery (45 King St.; 44-141-552-7141) are notable as crucibles of the late-20th-century scene.

Charles Rennie Mackintosh
Glasgow
Scotland

One of the pioneers of the Modern movement, architect and celebrated local son Charles Rennie Mackintosh (1868–1928) is as essential to Glasgow's fabric as Gaudí is to Barcelona. His Art Nouveau work was influenced by Scottish and Japanese traditions, and as a designer, architect, and artist, he took as much care with the interior as the exterior of his buildings, right down to the furniture, lighting, and artwork. His masterpiece, the Glasgow School of Art, is not to be missed (167 Renfrew St.; 44-141-353-4500), nor is his House for an Art Lover in Bellahouston Park, which was completed in 1996 based on plans he drew up in 1901 (10 Dumbreck Rd.; 44-141-353-4770; call ahead for weekday hours from Oct-March). There are also the Willow Tea Rooms (217 Sauchiehall St. and 97 Buchanan St.; 44-141-332-0521 or 44-141-204-5242) and the Scotland Street School Museum, which presents the changing face of Scottish education from the Victorian era through to the 1960s (225 Scotland St.; 44-141-287-0500; closed October–March). A reconstruction of the architect's own home is part of the Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery at the University of Glasgow—which, incidentally, also owns the best James McNeill Whistler collection outside the U.S. (University of Glasgow; 44-414-330-4221; closed Sundays).

Museums
Glasgow
Scotland

Opened in June 2011, Riverside Museum is a zinc and glass temple to transport designed by Zaha Hadid. It has over 3,000 objects and 150 interactive displays, including three re-created streets circa 1895-1980 lined with vintage trolleys and trams (100 Pointhouse Place; 44-141-287-2720). The four-story Glasgow Science Centre is a fun museum that holds interactive exhibits, a planetarium, Scotland's only IMAX theater, and the Glasgow Tower, Scotland's tallest freestanding structure (50 Pacific Quay; 44-141-420-5000). The People's Palace and Winter Gardens provides an informed and fun social context to the city. It's connected to the Victorian Winter Garden glasshouse, where you can sit amidst the greenery and have a cup of tea—very civilized (Glasgow Green; 44-141-271-2951). Clear up the mystery of the bagpipes at the National Piping Centre (30–34 McPhater St., Cowcaddens; 44-141-353-0220).

For art museums, see our Art entry.

Performing Arts
Glasgow
Scotland

Dating back to 1841, City Halls reopened in January 2006 following major renovation and is now the place to hear classical music in the city. It's home to the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra (Candleriggs; 44-141-353-8000; www.glasgowcityhalls.com). Housed in a modern sandstone-clad building, the Glasgow Royal Concert Hall is mainly a classical music venue but also hosts the folk and roots Celtic Connections Festival every January (2 Sauchiehall St.; 44-141-353-8000; www.grch.com). Located just steps from Glasgow Cross, the Tron Theatre—you'll know it by its beautiful 16th-century church steeple—is a top stop for strong contemporary theater (63 Trongate; 44-141-552-4267; www.tron.co.uk). In the rapidly redeveloping Gorbals area, the venerable Citizen's Theatre played host to Alan Cumming and Robert Carlyle in their early careers. (119 Gorbals St.; 44 141 429 0022; www.citz.co.uk).

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.