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Hong Kong Hotels

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Conrad Hong Kong
88 Queensway, Pacific Place
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 2521 3838
hongkonginfo@conradhotels.com
conradhotels.hilton.com/en/ch/hotels/index.jhtml?ctyhocn=HKGHCCI

This high-rise above "the shopping mecca of Pacific Place" is "the perfect respite" after a day of sightseeing, with views of Victoria Peak and the harbor. "Chic and lavish" rooms have Chinese cabinetry, dark wood panels, and Bose sound systems. The Garden Café's breakfast buffet has "plentiful options for individuals from all over the globe." "Great staff."

(510 rooms)

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
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The Excelsior
281 Gloucester Road
Causeway Bay
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 2894 8888
exhkg-info@mohg.com
www.excelsiorhongkong.com

Perhaps the only moderately priced Mandarin Oriental property in existence, this 30-year-old tower is big with business travelers and tour groups. But the reasonable rates aren't the only draw here. The location in Causeway Bay means it's close to shops, restaurants, and Victoria Park—not to mention the raunchy nightlife in Wanchai and the horse races at Happy Valley. And the 862 rooms are perfectly pleasant, in a blandly cheerful cruise-ship-cabin sort of way (molded window seats, patterned wall-to-wall carpeting, bright-colored bed and sofa cushions). The indoor tennis courts and the solicitous staffers might make you forget—momentarily—that you're not at the Landmark.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Fleming
41 Fleming Road
Wan Chai
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 3607 2288
www.thefleming.com.hk

Office towers and the futuristic Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre make the Wan Chai District a buzzing hub for business, but the neighborhood has lacked for stylish and economical accommodations. With just 66 guest rooms, The Fleming expertly fills the gap with its high ceilings, indulgent bathrooms, ergonomic office chairs, and Wi-Fi. (Executive suites add kitchenettes.) As Hong Kong's former number one–ranked pro tennis player, managing director John Hui got priceless insights into hotel living, which may explain creative touches like the city's first females-only floor, where healthy snacks fill the minibars. Access to California Fitness, Hong Kong's best-stocked gym located around the corner, makes up for the lack of in-house fitness facilities. Cubix restaurant serves up spicy tapas and an excellent entrecôte.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Four Seasons Hotel Hong Kong
8 Finance Street
Central
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 3196 8888
Tel: 800 819 5053
Fax: 852 3196 8899
www.fourseasons.com/hongkong/

Set in the towering International Finance Center among Central's high-rise office buildings, the Four Seasons is packed with business amenities. The massive property bustles with dark-suited execs who take advantage of the private boardrooms, round-the-clock secretarial services, and the 26,000-odd square feet of conference and convention space. But don't be fooled: This place isn't just for the name-badge set. There's also a trio of gorgeous outdoor pools, a 22,000-square-foot spa, and one of the city's hottest tables, Caprice, serving meticulous French cuisine. The 399 rooms have pale silk- and wood-paneled walls, lacquer and marble bathroom fixtures (and, yes, leather and steel office furniture). The characteristic Four Seasons service even includes kid-friendly extras like milk and cookies at bedtime.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Four Seasons Hotel Macau
Estrada da Baía de N. Senhora da Esperança, S/N
Taipa
Macau
China
Tel: 800 819 5053 (toll-free)
Tel: 853 2881 8888
www.fourseasons.com/macau/

This refined sanctuary trumps the city's gilded competition: Indo-Portuguese furniture and original Chinese paintings plus two grand staircases in the lobby evoke the European mansions of old Macau, while the efficient English-speaking staff are among Macau's best. The 360 stately rooms have Chinese silks as well as special touches such as evening turndown service that includes a bite-size Portuguese egg tart, Macanese almond cookies, and serradura, an even creamier take on tiramisu. In case the hotel's intimate Plaza Casino, five pools, and poolside cabanas with TVs aren't diversion enough, guests also have round-the-clock access to the behemoth Venetian via a three-story shopping arcade filled with top brands.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hotel LKF
33 Wyndham Street
Central District
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 3518 9688
www.hotel-LKF.com.hk

Denizens of Hong Kong's perennially grooving Lan Kwai Fong neighborhood can slide off the bar stool and into these beds without missing a beat. While the lobby staff is more attractive than effective, the street-facing, glass-enclosed space features retro-chic decor with cushy loungers that let the ultrasocial clientele keep an eye on the surrounding scene. Walls are hung with works by China's hottest photographers, including Wing Shya and Patrick Lee. And you can detox over on-site yoga (or take off those stilettos for Chinese foot reflexology). In the 95 compact but comfortable rooms, Aeron chairs and oversize desktops aid those who plan to work between nights on the town. But the most important features are the well-insulated floor-to-ceiling windows that block noise from after-dark revelry. Book any of the rooms ending in 02–08 for spectacular views over Central District rooftops to the Hong Kong Harbor.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hullett House
2a Canton Road
Tsim Sha Tsui
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 3988 0000
reservation@hulletthouse.com
www.hulletthouse.com

Neoclassical Hullett House hotel is the centerpiece of a 19th-century hilltop mansion that's been dressed up for 21st-century luxury seekers. The former Marine Police headquarters, just a stone's throw from Victoria Harbour in Kowloon, also houses swanky boutiques and Japanese, mod-Euro, and Cantonese concept restaurants. The interiors of the ten suites (ranging from 800 to 1,100 square feet), are based on different ancient-meets-modern visual themes—take your pick from updated British Regency, nuevo Chinoiserie, or a vivid red-lacquer interpretation of a local antique store. The Stanley Suite features an entire wall given over to a bamboo trellis mural of indigenous Chinese birds, offset by varnished walnut floorboards and a marble bathroom with a Lalique chandelier over the tub. Extras include complimentary Wi-Fi, iPod dock, free (nonalcoholic) minibar, and an outsize wall-hung TV. But you need to step outside the large French doors for the tour de force: each room has a broad stone balcony with a cushioned wicker chaise longue peeking through the royal palms at the courtyard below. A tad overdesigned in places, Hullett House nevertheless manages to balance respect for the building's history with a joyous evocation of art-inspired glamour.—Gary Bowerman

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
InterContinental Hong Kong
18 Salisbury Road
Kowloon
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 2721 1211
Tel: 888 424 6835
hongkong@interconti.com
www.ichotelsgroup.com/h/d/ic/1/en/hd/hkghc

Born as the Regent Hotel, the InterContinental was rechristened in 2001 and injected with $40 million in refurbishments. Since then, Kate Moss and John Travolta have stayed over, and Alain Ducasse's Spoon moved in (it was joined by the world's 14th Nobu outpost in December 2006). Anyone willing to drop $11,000 on a night's stay should book the palatial Presidential Suite with its private infinity pool and gym. For the rest of us, the 495 expansive rooms with their black-and-gold furnishings, Wi-Fi, iPod docking stations, and awesome city views are plenty good enough. There's also a sizable spa, an indulgent outdoor swimming pool, and Kowloon's top designer shops in walking distance.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Island Shangri-La
Pacific Place, Supreme Court Road
Central
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 2877 3838
isl@shangri-la.com
www.shangri-la.com/en/property/hongkong/islandshangrila

Hong Kong's tallest hotel (56 floors) dwarfs the extravagant shopping centers and office towers of Central. The harbor views are, naturally, impressive here—you can even see the Shangri-La's sister hotel across the water in Kowloon. Many of the 565 rooms have big windows that make the most of the vistas; all have flat-screen TVs, dark wood Chinese-style cabinets, and pale silk bedding. The proximity to major banks and law offices, along with lobby Wi-Fi and in-room fax machines, attracts suit-and-tie types, but shopaholics are happy here, too: Pacific Place, one of Hong Kong's ritziest malls, is just an escalator ride away. One rather surprising plus: Even though the property seems like a monument to glittering convenience, eco-friendly policies like recycling and using "green" cleaning products are employed here.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Jia Boutique Hotel
1-5 Irving Street
Causeway Bay
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 3196 9000
info@jiahongkong.com
www.jiahongkong.com

Jia is the Mandarin word for "home," and though that may seem far-fetched unless Philippe Starck designed your pad, there are some nice domestic touches here. Starck's 54 white-on-white studios and suites, designed by Philippe Starck, come with dining tables, kitchenettes with microwaves and dishes, and swiveling flat-screen TVs that you can point toward whichever comfy chair or couch you'd like to sit in. A stylish, media- and tech-savvy crowd chooses this place; its cool, casual vibe is markedly different from the formal, hand-and-foot service found at the city's grande-dame hotels. That doesn't mean the Jia is entirely DIY, though: The reasonable rates include breakfast, afternoon tea, and evening cocktails.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
JW Marriott Hotel Hong Kong
88 Queensway, Pacific Place
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 2810 8366
Fax: 852 2845 0737
marriott.com/property/propertypage.mi?marshaCode=HKGDT

This high-rise's location above the Pacific Place mall makes it "central enough that you can walk to all the best attractions." Rooms have yellow, dark brown, and red tones with "pretty bathrooms that are appropriately marbled everywhere." "The Sunday champagne brunch in the Lounge is phenomenal." "Staff show great attention to detail."

(602 rooms)

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Kowloon Shangri-La
64 Mody Road
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 2721 2111
ksl@shangri-la.com
www.shangri-la.com/en/property/hongkong/kowloonshangrila

The property is set so close to the waterfront that "you can practically dip your toes into the harbor." Upon entering the two-story lobby, guests encounter "gleaming Italian marble floors," Viennese crystal chandeliers, and a tiered mosaic-marble fountain. Rooms display soothing beige tones. Angelini, "the least corporate of the restaurants," serves Italian to views of Victoria Harbour.

(688 rooms)

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Landmark Mandarin Oriental
15 Queen's Road Central
Central
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 2132 0188
Tel: 866 526 6567
lmhkg-enquiry@mohg.com
www.mandarinoriental.com/landmark

Although its sister property, the original Mandarin Oriental, has now reopened (with much hullabaloo), the Landmark is no slouch, either. Although some of the 113 spacious rooms and suites have unsexy office-tower views, all have oversized plasma televisions, yoga mats, and beautiful Asian-style minimalist furnishings (sliding wood doors, low tables, lots of dark wood, and perfectly placed floral arrangements). The bathrooms are marble, and those in the 600 room series have enormous freestanding circular tubs. The hotel's showy public spaces—like the Amber restaurant, with its cascading metallic ceiling sculptures, and the dramatically chic split-level MO Bar—have even better feng shui. The 21,000-square-foot Oriental Spa features his-and-hers hammams, detoxifying amethyst-crystal steam rooms, and underwater day beds in steamy stone hot tubs.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Langham Hong Kong
8 Peking Road
Tsimshatsui
Kowloon
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 800 588 9141 (toll-free)
Tel: 852 2375 1133
tlhkg.info@langhamhotels.com
hongkong.langhamhotels.com/en

Surrounded by flagship designer stores, this 16-story property in the heart of Kowloon has a lobby with an impressive marble staircase, rock-crystal chandeliers, marble and onyx columns, and international art. "No detail is missed" in Grand Rooms with timber- and leather-paneled walls and wool carpets. The Bostonian dishes up sustainable seafood, steaks, and Welsh grass-fed lamb cutlets.

(495 rooms)

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Langham Place Hotel
555 Shanghai Street
Mongkok, Kowloon
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 3552 3388
hkg.lph.info@langhamhotels.com
hongkong.langhamplacehotels.com

The Langham made quite a stir in 2004, when it opened in the middle of the once-seedy Mongkok district; the ultramodern glass complex, which includes a swanky, 600,000-square-foot shopping mall, jump-started the gentrification of the entire neighborhood. It set the bar high, too, with an outdoor rooftop pool, four restaurants, and the opulent Chuan Spa. The hotel also boasts one of the best contemporary Chinese art collections in the whole city: Paintings and drawings decorate not only the common areas but also the 665 luxurious rooms, where the low-key, streamlined furnishings and flat-screen TVs complement rather than detract from the art. Getting a good night's sleep is taken very seriously here—in addition to cushy beds with the requisite silky, high-thread-count sheets, there's an over-the-top pillow menu that lets guests choose between different shapes, fillings, and even fragrances (for example, rose, lavender, or Japanese tea). The bathrooms are all chrome and marble, with only glass walls dividing them from the bedroom area (there are retractable screens for the modest). If you feel like a lazy night in, you can choose from the hotel's huge DVD lending library; for something livelier, the on-site Backyard restaurant hosts weekend-night alfresco barbecues under fairy-lit mango trees.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Mandarin Oriental, Hong Kong
5 Connaught Road
Central
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 2522 0111
mohkg-reservations@mohg.com
www.mandarinoriental.com/hongkong

After $140 million in renovations, Mandarin Oriental, Hong Kong, reopened in September 2006 and immediately regained its perch as Hong Kong's grande dame. High-tech amenities like iPod docking stations and sound systems have been added to the 502 rooms and suites, and all of them are larger now that the balconies have been eliminated (the grand Victoria Harbour views are still there, through the giant new windows). The decor throughout is sumptuous, with earth-toned brocade fabrics and carved wood furniture offset by statuary, orchids, and bonsai plants. The bathrooms are dramatic, with dark marble counters and floors; some have freestanding tubs where you can soak up to your chin. The hotel's nine restaurants and bars include Pierre, the new French eatery of three-star Michelin chef Pierre Gagnaire. There's also a colonnaded lap pool, a beauty salon, a spa with a Chinese herbal steam room, and—for undoing all your slimming treatments—a sumptuous cake shop.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Peninsula Hong Kong
Salisbury Road
Kowloon
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 2920 2888
Tel: 866 382 8388
pen@peninsula.com
www.hongkong.peninsula.com/

We'll come right out and say it: The Peninsula is one of the finest hotels in the world, and has been since 1928. Upon arriving in Hong Kong, guests are whisked from the airport to the hotel's Clipper Lounge via a ten-minute helicopter ride (aerophobes can rough it in one of the Peninsula's Rolls-Royce limos). Set in the heart of Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon's shopping mecca, and across the street from the Cultural Centre and the Museum of Art, the hotel also has stunning harbor views (many of the 300 rooms come with their own telescopes for surveying Victoria Peak). The interiors epitomize postcolonial luxury, with heavy silk curtains, dark wood furniture, and porcelain antiques; scores of attentive yet discreet staffers are at your beck and call. In the bar, called the Lobby, a string quartet fiddles away to the accompaniment of clinking teaspoons; Felix, the Philippe Starck-designed Euro-Asian rooftop restaurant, is still a must-go, even though it's been around since 1994. For off-the-charts hedonism, hit the ESPA spa (opened in summer of 2006) for a Chinese balancing wrap and massage.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Ritz-Carlton Hong Kong
International Commerce Centre
1 Austin Road W.
Kowloon
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 2263 2263
rc.bjsrz.leads@ritzcarlton.com
www.ritzcarlton.com/en/Properties/Beijing/Default.htm

Throughout this helicopter-view hotel, currently billed as the highest in the world, the extreme elevation of the Ritz-Carlton Hong Kong in the 1,588-foot-high ICC Tower is matched by equally high-quality hospitality. Jaw-dropping views are a leitmotif, with floor-to-ceiling glass used throughout to showcase Hong Kong's surprisingly varied landscapes. An ear-popping 56-second elevator ride takes guests to the 87th-floor lobby. Decorated in cream, chocolate, and caramel, the 312 guest rooms each have a telescope and tripod (of course), twin-speaker Bose iPod dock, plasma TV and DVD player, and high-speed Wi-Fi—plus those magnificent vistas. Cocktails at the 118th-floor Ozone bar come with a panorama of Hong Kong in all its dramatic neon-lit glory. But best of all is the infinity pool, also on the 118th floor, featuring in-water loungers and a giant video screen that plays aquatic imagery on one wall and the ceiling while clouds sail past the window. The ultimate high.—Gary Bowerman

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Upper House
Pacific Place
88 Queensway
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 2918 1838
info@upperhouse.com
www.upperhouse.com

Occupying a former apartment tower slap-bang in the center of the Admiralty district, Swire Hotels' second boutique property treads in the creative footsteps of its Beijing sibling, Opposite House. This one has been styled by Hong Kong–based Andre Fu, and the 117 rooms (including 21 suites and 2 penthouses) and signature Café Gray Deluxe restaurant—with former New York chef Gray Kunz at the helm—are aimed unerringly at the design-conscious set. The high-rise rooms, in soft gray and blue with blond wood, start at a sizable 730 square feet and feature expansive windows with cushioned banquettes, allowing for a relaxed appreciation of the city views. All rooms are well laid out and come with a walk-in closet, free Wi-Fi, complimentary minibar, and a bathtub set on a plinth for long soaks overlooking either Victoria Harbor or the Peak. From ground-floor entry to the 49th-floor check-in lounge and restaurant/bar, the entire anti–chain hotel experience is deliberately minimalist, though at times the coveted coolness is a little overplayed—the restaurant staff in particular seem brusque and self-satisfied. That said, the hotel's relatively small size and intimate public areas—especially the Café Gray Deluxe bar's semiprivate window-front recesses with cushioned seats—retain a palpable stylish buzz, especially after dark. The central location is another plus, with Hong Kong's liveliest restaurant and nightlife districts within easy reach.—Gary Bowerman

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Venetian Macao-Resort-Hotel
The Cotai Strip
Taipa
Macau
China
Tel: 853 2882 8877
room.reservations@venetian.com.mo
www.venetianmacao.com

If Macau is the new Sin City, the $2.4 billion Venetian Macao resort is the ultimate ode to China's new consumer culture. Like its Las Vegas counterpart, the 3,000-suite Venice Italy–themed hotel complex has three indoor canals (complete with singing gondoliers), no fewer than 30 restaurants, and a million square feet of shopping. The cavernous lobby is packed with day-trippers, who stroll in awe along the vaulted mall under a ceiling of faux Renaissance paintings, and through the Grand Canal arcade, lined with Venetian-style shops. Despite the hotel's over-the-top antics, the suites are quite elegant and comfortable, incorporating antique-look Chinese furniture and wood carvings, canopied beds, and a sunken sitting area. The 550,000-square-foot casino—the world's largest—is the real highlight, filled night and day with serious-minded gamblers. The hotel stands out not so much for its elegance and pampering as for its embodiment of Macau in all its kitschy, surreal fun.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
W Hong Kong
1 Austin Road West
Kowloon Station, Kowloon
Hong Kong
China
Tel: 852 3717 222
www.whotels.com/hongkong

This 393-room high-rise is like a fun-loving younger sister to Kowloon grandes dames the InterContinental and The Peninsula. It's home to the city's highest swimming pool (at least until the Ritz-Carlton opens across the street), and the sunset views from the seventy-sixth-floor Jacuzzi and from Asia's first Bliss Spa are something to write home about. The decor— topsy-turvy bookcases, ticking clocks, and modern woodland motifs—create an energetic and surrealist atmosphere. Cleverly designed rooms make the best use of the space, and room service adds whimsical touches: A delightful toy replica of a Hong Kong double-decker bus comes with your order. When you feel the need to venture out of your rabbit hole, the Living Room lounge is a hot nightspot, while the Kitchen restaurant pulls out all the stops for Sunday brunch, including a chocolate fountain.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Wynn Macau
Rua Cidade de Sintra NAPE
Macau
China
Tel: 853 986 9966
wynnmacau.com

With its concave shape and a lobby of designer stores, the Wynn Macau is a lot like its Las Vegas sister property—and with 600 rooms and a 100,000-square-foot casino, the Wynn Macau is still the smaller sibling. Rooms, with Andy Warhol Day-Glo prints, are appointed in a style that recalls American resorts of yesteryear: floral-print sofas, saffron-hued fabrics, high beds. The staff's English is limited except at Il Teatro and the other restaurants, but gambling is Macau's raison d'être, and the Wynn sets the new standard, with 372 slots as well as blackjack and fan-tan tables. The Spa at Wynn Macau is included among the 2007 Hot List Spas.

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.