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Bauhaus Center
155 Dizengoff
Tel Aviv
Israel
Tel: 972 3 5220249
info@bauhaus-center.com
www.bauhaus-center.com

Though small, the Bauhaus Center packs in nearly the entire history of the design genre—both in Israel and abroad—in its exhibits. The store's books, posters, maps, and a wide range of Bauhaus-styled home accessories make the center feel relevant to both design scholars and newcomers. For a more in-depth view, take the center's two-hour walking tour of Tel Aviv's Bauhaus legacy, conducted in English, Hebrew, and German.

Dizengoff Center
Dizengoff Street at King George Street
Tel Aviv
Israel

Although you won't find much in terms of luxury merchandise, Tel Aviv's main mall is worth a visit for its array of local clothing brands. The best-quality—and still low-priced—labels are Castro (look for its massive flagship store), Fox, Renuar, and Kenvelo. On Friday mornings, Dizengoff Center is the scene of a food market where vendors hawk homemade edibles of nearly every imaginable culinary style. There's also Soho Design Center, for displays of work by the new Israeli generation, fashion exhibitions, and a vast inventory of design books, housewares, kids' stuff, and gadgets from across the globe (972-3-621-2450; www.sohocenter.co.il).

Gavriel
42 Montefiore Street
Tel Aviv
Israel
Tel: 972 3 566 7020

Housed in an elegantly restored Bauhaus building in Tel Aviv's "White City," this restaurant and boutique traffics in the "country chic" aesthetic usually reserved for Napa and Provence. Downstairs, owners Dotan Halbreich and Rubi Israeli serve lemony asparagus salad in almond cream topped with apple slices, and hearty beef ragoût ravioli. Upstairs, the rustic marketplace stocks home basics and accessories such as custom-made Egyptian cotton linens, steel cocktail shakers, and colorful potpourri. A sister establishment in Neve Tzedek, called Alya (the name means goddess), also pairs a menu of light, organic meals with a well-edited selection of housewares, from white porcelain vases, trays, and pitchers to dried-flower bouquets and elegant kids' furniture (13 Amzaleg St.; 011-972-3-5168836). Products are sourced from Holland, Belgium, and Scandinavia, as well as ateliers throughout Israel.

Markets
Tel Aviv
Israel

Urban markets are where Tel Aviv struts its Middle Eastern bona fides. The one not to miss is the massive daily flea market in the Biblical port district of Jaffa, which comes into its chaotic best on Friday mornings. You'll find antique furniture and carpets, Middle Eastern–styled clothing, and collectibles such as watches and pens. Peddlers bring their aromatic spices to hawk at the Levinsky Street market and discount clothing purveyors pile heaps of designer leftovers in the Bazalel Market at the corner of King George and Allenby streets (both daily). On Tuesdays and Fridays, head for the antiques market in Dizengoff Circle and the arts and crafts market (ceramics, glassware, jewelry, handmade candles) in the Nahalat Binyamin pedestrian mall. If you like what you see in Tel Aviv, then also check out a souk (Arabic for market) in the Muslim quarter of Jerusalem's Old City. Best accessed via the Damascus Gate, the market is a warren of sweets shops, gold sellers, and small hummus restaurants. While in the markets, stay alert and beware of the dangers of terrorism in crowded public places.

Michal Negrin
37 Shenkin Street
Tel Aviv
Israel
Tel: 972 3 525 2752
www.michalnegrin.com

Crafted from nickel-free metal that has the appearance of antique bronze and accented by everything from Swarovski crystal to lace to vintage photographs, Michal Negrin's jewelry channels Victorian femininity into very wearable modern designs. Negrin's ever-expanding roster of boutiques (51 to date, in Europe, Asia, and North America) exports her work all over the world, but the Israel native still creates each design, and every piece is hand-finished by local artisans. Like this flagship city-center Tel Aviv boutique, her stores are outfitted as if they were a lady's dressing room.

Tel Aviv Designer Boutiques
Tel Aviv
Israel

Although Tel Aviv still lacks a single standout global retail brand, areas such as Gan HaHashmal and Florentine are emerging as the city's "indie" fashion and design hub. Gan HaHashmal, which means "electric garden" in Hebrew, is named for its location close to Israel's first power station. Once Tel Aviv's Red Light zone, it's now the city's version of Manhattan's Meatpacking District, with cutting-edge clothiers and accessories designers such as Mishi (10 Nehama Street; 972 3 682 9615; mishi-design.com) and Kisim (8 HaHashmal Street; 972 3 560 4890; kisim.com) for leather goods, Paula Bianco (12 Harakevet Street; 972 3 68 50171; www.paulabianco.biz) for Art Deco–inspired jewelry, and Nona Elga (12 Barzilay Street; 972 3 560 1257) and Sharon Brunsher (12 Harakevet Street; 972 3 560 4834; www.brunsher.com) for featherweight, versatile womenswear. The shops in neighboring Florentine range from small-scale spice mongers on the western end to furniture and home-accessories boutiques further east. Furniture maker Kastiel (36 Alfasi Street; 972 3 683 6334; www.kastiel.com) has debuted a 50,000-square-foot white-on-white showroom melding a restored Ottoman-era corral and a 1950s warehouse; the company's modern furniture shares space with pieces by artists working in studios up above. Just down the street, past tiny carpentry workshops and the occasional auto garage, luxe bedding firm B. Knit (34 Ben Atar Street; 972 3 518 1138; www.bknit.com)—which once supplied Donna Karan—has an small, well-stocked outlet selling stylish sheets, duvet covers, and a clothing line. Also worth a visit is tiny olive oil boutique Olia, (73 Frishman Street; 972 3 522 3235; www.olia.co.il) near central Rabin Square, which sells organic Israeli olive oils for the kitchen and olive oil soaps and scrubs for the bath.

Wine in Israel

In recent years, Israel—like South Africa and South America—has emerged as one of the globe's next great wine-producing regions. Travelers who don't have time to visit local vineyards can stock up on good bottles in Tel Aviv at Derech Hayayin (93 Haheshmonaim St.; 972-3-561-9263) and Vino Cigar (Azrieli Center, First Floor; 972-3-609-4577).

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.