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Istanbul Hotels

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
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Ansen Suites
130 Meşrutiyet Caddesi
Tünel
Istanbul
Turkey 34430
Tel: 90 212 245 8808
info@ansensuites.com
www.ansensuites.com

This small ten-room town house on the edge of Tünel, Istanbul's most bohemian neighborhood, is probably one of the best options in town in terms of price, location, and hip factor. Enter through the Italian Da Vittorio restaurant at street level and you'll find the hotel reception office at the back, manned by a coolheaded collective with none of the stuffy airs of most high-enders in the city. The suites are so-called due to the presence of small kitchen units, though they're better described as spacious rooms, averaging around 500 to 600 square feet, with wireless Internet and cable TV. Decked out in a classy minimalist style, each room has a different design and color scheme, so ask to see a selection before you decide. The higher the room, the better the view of the Golden Horn; those in back are quieter and overlook the charming (if grimy) turn-of-the-century street. You're a minute's walk away from Asmalımescit, a formerly run-down area where funky new cafés and bars are opening at breakneck speed. From here, you can exit onto İstiklal Caddesi and easily reach both Sultanahmet and Taksim.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
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Ayasofya Mansions
Soğukçeşme Sokağı
Sultanahmet
Istanbul
Turkey 34400
Tel: 90 212 513 3660
info@ayasofyakonaklari.com
www.ayasofyapensions.com

It would be hard to get much closer to history than one of these small rooms that back onto the outer walls of Topkapı Palace and look directly at the side of the Hagia Sophia. Located along a row of brightly painted old wooden houses on a marvelously restored cobbled street with a guard placed at either end (presumably to maintain the scene's Disney-like innocence), the Ayasofya Mansions are a reasonable option for those wishing to stay in the heart of the historic district. Indeed, you'll know you've arrived when you hear the call to prayer coming from several mosques in the vicinity (the first one just before dawn). The little lane was transformed in the late '80s by the Touring and Automobile Club of Turkey, which later also undertook the restoration of the Hotel Konuk Evi farther down the street. Both places are run from the same reception base and offer a pretty independent setup, with guests responsible for letting themselves in, and rooms that are clean, if a bit shabby, with tacky brass beds. The Konuk Evi is located in a grander, mansionlike building with late-Ottoman chandeliers, giant gilded mirrors, piano with candelabra, and a huge 19th-century painting of Sultan Abdülmecid hanging on the wall.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
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Çırağan Palace Kempinski Istanbul
32 Çırağan Caddesi
Beşiktaş
Istanbul
Turkey 34349
Tel: 90 212 326 4646
reservationoffice.ciraganpalace@kempinski.com
www.kempinski.com/en/istanbul/Pages/Welcome.aspx

This mid-19th-century palace, located on the site of an 18th-century residence belonging to the last Ottoman sultans, housed the Turkish parliament for two months before becoming a city dump: You follow that? Well, all you need to know these days is that this is one of only two grand hotels on the European shores of the Bosphorus (the other is the just-opened Four Seasons) and it straddles two neighborhoods: colorful harbor-front Ortaköy with its outdoor restaurants and Beşiktaş, where you can hop on a Bosphorus ferry. Nearly all the 315 rooms are in an adjacent modern building—a charmless E-shaped block that is most remarkable for its water views. What you don't want is one of the 102 Park View rooms in back; unfortunately, to upgrade to the least expensive sea-view room adds about $165 per night. If you do so, you won't gain much in decor: Recent renovations haven't dimmed the corporate, ahem, magnificence. Throughout are armoires, headboards, desks, and nightstands in matching fancy wood veneers; the same cluster of faux-bazaar brocade pillows adorn each bed; superior rooms add an Arabian Nights canopy over the top. Still, they're large, the common areas are numerous and plush, and you can escape into the opulent hammam or the pool that butts right up against the Bosphorus—as do the three restaurants.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
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Four Seasons Hotel Istanbul at the Bosphorus
28 Çırağan Caddesi
Beşiktaş
Istanbul
Turkey 34349
Tel: 90 212 381 4000
reservations.bosphorus@fourseasons.com
www.fourseasons.com/bosphorus

The Çırağan Kempinski must have been glancing nervously over its shoulder in June 2008, when the new Four Seasons Bosphorus opened in the elegant 19th-century Atık Paşa Palace right next door. Would the upstart steal its crown as the city's sultan of waterside luxury? The answer: not quite. While the new Four Seasons definitely rivals the Kempinski in opulence and service, it stops short of outshining its neighbor. In contrast to the compact elegance of the city's first Four Seasons—a 15-minute cab ride away in the old city of Sultanahmet—the chain's new location on the banks of the Bosphorus compensates for its peripheral address with bags of breathing space and a killer view. Ogle at the picture-perfect tableau of exterior poolside gardens set against the building's molded ivory facade, but avert your eyes from the painful sight of the two auxiliary wings, which contain most of the hotel's low- and mid-range rooms. The decor throughout is tasteful but humdrum, with muted tones of cream, beige, and brown and only a light sprinkling of Turkish motifs—a relief to some, a disappointment to others. If you're ready to shell out a few hundred euros extra, treat yourself to a room or suite in the palace building itself, where high ceilings and enormous windows offer a full frontal view of the Bosphorus—and the most romantic night in the city. (Rooms in the modern wings have at best partial views of the water; some overlook a brick wall and the adjacent high school.) Service is excellent, verging on obsequious (prepare to be addressed in French upon your arrival), and the hotel's in-house restaurant, Aqua, is worth a visit for chef Fabio Brambilla's Mediterranean fish fare. Make time for the spa here: The pillared underground swimming hall (swim underwater to hear classical music piped through the pool) and hammam offer an easy morning's pampering.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Four Seasons Hotel Istanbul at Sultanahmet
1 Tevkifhane Sokak
Sultanahmet
Istanbul
Turkey 34110
Tel: 90 212 638 8200
Fax: 90 212 638 8210
www.fourseasons.com/istanbul

Probably the only Four Seasons in a prison, and one of the smallest in the chain, but there's nothing confining about this 65-room hotel very handily midway between Hagia Sophia and the Blue Mosque. In fact, the century-old neoclassical Sultanahmet Prison, built on top of a buried Byzantine palace, was infamous as the place where the government threw dissidents along with pimps and drug dealers. Chase off any memories of Brad Davis suffering in Midnight Express, however: Nowadays, the former exercise yard is a pleasant courtyard set behind a handsome ocher facade, and any sadistic guards have been supplanted by a well-trained, obliging staff. The entrance halls have soaring stone arches and grand Ottoman-revival stairways; as for the bedrooms, even the standards (on the first floor) are big, with high ceilings and huge windows. The top-of-the-line duplex suites are fabulous with their views of the Blue Mosque and/or Hagia Sophia, but booking something in the next tier or two down might get you stuck overlooking the courtyard, while some lowly "deluxe" rooms have partial views and even a balcony. Bottom line: Ask when you book. There's a fitness center but no pool—digging's restricted because of that underground palace. Its size and reputation mean this place is always booked up well in advance, but another Four Seasons came to the rescue in June 2008, occupying a restored Bosphorus palace near the Çirağan Palace.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
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Hotel Empress Zoe
10 Akbiyik Cadessi, Adliye Sokak
Sultanahmet
Istanbul
Turkey 34400
Tel: 90 212 518 2504
info@emzoe.com
www.emzoe.com

Set alongside the glut of cheaper hotels, guesthouses, and hostels in Sultanahmet, the Empress Zoe is one of the rare places in the area to display any spark of creativity in its concept and design. Named after a female ruler of Byzantium (and an infamous polygamist), it occupies a number of old wood-and-brick town houses, resting partially on ancient Byzantine walls and vaulted passages that are visible in the lobby. The charming garden (whose few tables serve as a fair-weather breakfast venue) is bordered by a disused 15th-century hammam. The 25 rooms come in a variety of shapes and sizes, with a lived-in feel that might lead more exacting hoteliers to freshen up with a change of curtains (rooms are being spruced up a few at a time). But they are quaint, with an overriding Anatolian style—black-stained oak, terra-cotta tiles, kilims, embroidered upholstery—that spills over into a number of the bathrooms, some of which are marbled mini-hammams. The Penthouse Suite in the main building has a private terrace with Blue Mosque views, and the Deluxe Garden Suite in the Chez Zoe annex has a platform bed framed by a harem-like screen. The location is great for sightseeing but is diminished by the adjacent Akbıyık Degirmeni Sokak, a street that's invariably a beer-drinking backpackers' haven.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hotel Les Ottomans
168 Muallim Nacı Caddesi
Kuruçeşme
Istanbul
Turkey 34345
Tel: 90 212 287 1024
info@lesottomans.com
www.lesottomans.com.tr

When Hotel Les Ottomans opened in 2006 in a renovated 18th-century mansion in Kuruçeşme, a little way up the Bosphorus on the European side, it unequivocally raised the bar for boutique hotels in the city. The sultans themselves would have appreciated local designer Zeynep Fadılloğlu's lavishness and attention to detail. Handmade Turkish furnishings mingle with imported Indian, South African, and Venetian artifacts, from the stunning "tree branch" chandelier in the Yalı Hatun restaurant (which serves outside in the summer) through the open-plan reception area and lounge, to each of the ten suites on the upper floor. The cheaper quarters ($1,200 and up) are of a standard that would pass for la crème in other hotels: Individually themed, they are usually split-level and sufficiently spacious, whereas the larger suites with their extra living rooms and office space almost feel excessive. In terms of bang for your buck, comps abound, including free minibar and breakfast, and yacht trips on the Bosphorus; frequent packages throw in things like a couple's massage in the excellent Caudalie Vinotherapie Spa, or open entry to the in-house Q Jazz bar. The team of helpers includes a butler, a translator, a dietitian, and a professional shopper. The downside is that only four of the ten suites face the Bosphorus; the others look out onto the hotel's garden, which is abruptly interrupted by the busy coast road.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
The House Hotel Galatasaray
19 Bostanbaşı Caddesi
Beyoğlu
Istanbul
Turkey 34425
Tel: 90 212 252 04 22
info@thehousehotel.com
/www.thehousehotel.com/the-house-hotel-galatasaray/

From the people who oversee Istanbul's ever-expanding locations of the modish House Café comes the House Hotel, which opened in summer 2010. This property's location, on a dilapidated residential street, is not pretty, but it's at the edge of Çukurcuma and Tophane, two of Istanbul's fastest-developing neighborhoods. Design group Autoban converted a 19th-century apartment building into a luxury modern space without compromising the original elegance of the enormous heavy doors, high molded ceilings, and wide marble staircase (beware—there is no elevator). At the same time, the renovation incorporated some daring modern touches, such as an in-room shower pod and hexagonally perforated ceiling panels in the corridors. The 20 rooms have minimalist chandeliers and whiter-than-white walls to make up for the lack of light most of them receive. The cheap seats are the mini suites located in the basement, while the prize spaces are the attic rooms on the top floor. Request number 19 for a view of the Galata Tower, and angle for front-facing rooms if you're sensitive to noise (the hotel backs up onto a café's garden). Two other properties by the same group are located in the upmarket neighborhood of Ni şanta şı and on the banks of the Bosphorus in the scenic village of Ortaküy.—Vanessa Able

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
The House Hotel Galatasaray
19 Bostanbaşı Caddesi
Beyoğlu
Istanbul
Turkey 34425
Tel: 90 212 252 04 22
info@thehousehotel.com
/www.thehousehotel.com/the-house-hotel-galatasaray/

From the people who oversee Istanbul's ever-expanding locations of the modish House Café comes the House Hotel, which opened in summer 2010. This property's location, on a dilapidated residential street, is not pretty, but it's at the edge of Çukurcuma and Tophane, two of Istanbul's fastest-developing neighborhoods. Design group Autoban converted a 19th-century apartment building into a luxury modern space without compromising the original elegance of the enormous heavy doors, high molded ceilings, and wide marble staircase (beware—there is no elevator). At the same time, the renovation incorporated some daring modern touches, such as an in-room shower pod and hexagonally perforated ceiling panels in the corridors. The 20 rooms have minimalist chandeliers and whiter-than-white walls to make up for the lack of light most of them receive. The cheap seats are the mini suites located in the basement, while the prize spaces are the attic rooms on the top floor. Request number 19 for a view of the Galata Tower, and angle for front-facing rooms if you're sensitive to noise (the hotel backs up onto a café's garden). Two other properties by the same group are located in the upmarket neighborhood of Nişantaşı and on the banks of the Bosphorus in the scenic village of Ortaküy.—Vanessa Able

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Ibrahim Pasha
5 Terzihane Sokak, Adliye Yani
Sultanahmet
Istanbul
Turkey
Tel: 90 212 518 0394
Fax: 90 212 518 4457
www.ibrahimpasha.com

This four-story hundred-year-old town house is named after the palace of Ibrahim Pasha opposite—whose divine Islamic Arts museum can be easily checked off your to-see list if you score one of these 16 rooms. Recently renovated and outfitted in sensitive high style with the amenities and spaces you'd expect at twice the rate, the rooms have deep carpets and big windows, cranberry velvet lounging couches and white button-back bucket chairs, chrome and glass tables and walls hung, variously, with framed odalisques, mirrors and flat-screen TVs. They also have A/C, minibars, Wi-Fi, and safes. Above them all is a glorious roof deck from which you can practically touch the Blue Mosque; downstairs a lounge/café/bar/breakfast room (breakfast is included) with fireplace and walls of framed prints is rendered yet homier by a resident yellow Lab's enthusiasm.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Lush Hotel
12 Sıraselviler Caddesi
Taksim
Istanbul
Turkey 34433
Tel: 90 212 243 9595
info@lushhotel.com
www.lushhotel.com

The lively nightlife and shopping area around Beyoğlu is generally neglected by hotel entrepreneurs, leaving a choice between brass-knobbed chains and shabby backstreet bolt-holes. But the arrival of a line of middle ground places is inevitable, and the Lush is the first to offer interesting accommodation without the fanfare. The hotel is integrated into a centenarian apartment building, and its strong suit is undoubtedly its 35 rooms, each individually designed by co-owner and architect Elif Özdemir. They are quirky and enjoyable, particularly room 305, where select pieces of traditional furniture are set against whitewashed brick and some curious landscapes are painted on the walls; the split-level suite 104 comes complete with its own little hammam, floor cushions, and water pipe. All are fitted with LCD TVs and Wi-Fi. The cheaper rooms are worth the price, as the quarters are immaculate and the bathrooms far above the neighborhood average; past the $300 mark, however, you'll be forced to weigh convenience against the amenities of a larger and better-equipped hotel. Having said that, the previously Spartan reception area has undergone a makeover in the last year, and the hotel has also introduced a small spa that offers a handful of different types of massage.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Park Hyatt Istanbul–Maçka Palas
4 Bronz Sokak
Teşvikiye, Şişli
Istanbul
Turkey 34367
Tel: 90 212 315 1234
istanbul.park@hyatt.com
istanbul.park.hyatt.com

Opened in fall 2008, the Park Hyatt is a sophisticated, stylish hotel with all the modest self-assuredness that is the mark of a solid high-end brand. Architect Randy Gerner's interiors offer a refreshing change from the usual Ottoman themes; 1920s-style dark wood paneling, faded Art Deco mirrors, and black and white images come together in this classic old former apartment building in the Nişantaşı neighborhood, a posh district situated just north of Taksim Square. Inspired by the palazzi of Milan, the 1922 edifice was originally intended as an ambassador's residence. Now, the 90 rooms average a sizable 635 square feet, including generous bathrooms with stand-alone tubs, Dornbracht showers, and thoughtful touches like a tap for filtered drinking water. Opt for a Park Deluxe room for a French balcony, or a Spa King unit to melt into your own hammam-style space and en-suite steam room. For dinner, go no further than the ground-floor steak house, the Prime, whose cuts are served in association with Dükkan, the city's top butcher. Overall, the Park Hyatt is a great option for business travelers or those seeking a little indulgence in a classier, less touristy—though still vibrant—part of Istanbul.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Pera Palace Hotel
52 Meşrutiyet Caddesi
Tepebaşı
Beyoğlu
Istanbul
Turkey 34310
Tel: 90 212 377 40 00
reservations@perapalace.com
www.perapalace.com

Once the stomping ground of the 1920s glitterati (this is where Agatha Christies=, Ernest Hemingway, and Greta Garbo came to stay), the Pera Palace fell into disrepair by the turn of the millennium. After closing in 2008 for a $30-million makeover, Istanbul's grande dame was again ready for her close-up. Alas, when the hotel reopened in fall 2010, the changes led to disappointment among aficionados who loved the chintzy feel of the old place and the prices that matched. Some elements, like the central hall and the caged elevator (the oldest of its kind still in operation), have managed to retain their character. But for the most part, the renovations have left the Pera Palace looking a little sanitized (something that scattering various bits of Orient-Express memorabilia has failed to remedy). If you have no nostalgic whimsy, though, this is a solid high-end hotel in a central part of town. There are 115 rooms, and even the entry-level accommodations are spacious. Most are fitted with French balconies, as well as the odd piece of original antique furniture. If you can stretch the budget, the corner Pierre Loti suites are the best. Insist on a room overlooking the Golden Horn. Rooms on the other side are gloomy, especially the Hemingway suite, with its awkward layout and drab, disappointing views.—Vanessa Able

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Ritz-Carlton, Istanbul
Süzer Plaza, Elmadağ
Taksim
Istanbul
Turkey 34367
Tel: 90 212 334 4444
www.ritzcarlton.com/hotels/istanbul

The Ritz-Carlton occupies 15 floors of one of the city's most controversial buildings: Süzer Plaza, a dreary monolith that stands obnoxiously at the heart of a primarily green zone, just behind the famous Beşiktaş İnönü football stadium. The R-C transformed the lackluster tower with its signature deluxe touch, making the most of the spectacular panoramas of the Bosphorus and the city: There is no such thing here as a room without some kind of a view. Interior designer Sinan Kafadar seamlessly blended the hallmark Ritz-Carlton classicism with a late-Ottoman flavor that never spills over into gaudy Orientalism. Bathrooms are adorned with modern İznik tiles; walls are decked with intriguing prints of old engravings and lithographs; the lobby, restaurant, and front bar areas are peppered with traditional teapots and bowls filled with lokum (Turkish delight). The hotel is physically not far from the city center, but the short stroll to attractions such as the Dolmabahçe Palace and Yıldız park is along narrow sidewalks that border terrifyingly busy main roads. Most guests rely on taxis, yet the staff handles the crush at the door with aplomb. Currently, the hotel's only food option is the rather formal Çintemani restaurant (there's an outdoor terrace in summer), but the wood-and-leather English club–style RC Bar on the lobby level is a fantastic setting for a drink or late-night boat-watching on the Bosphorus.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Sofa Hotel & Residences
123 Teşvikiye Caddesi
Nişantaşı
Istanbul
Turkey 34367
Tel: 90 212 368 1818
info@thesofahotel.com
www.thesofahotel.com

If you can forgive the rather humdrum name and slightly away-from-center location (trendy Nişantaşı, about a five-minute cab ride from Taksim Square), you'll be treated to a modern boutique hotel of European-caliber quality and design. Opened in 2006, the Sofa shot straight into high demand, and advance bookings are advised to secure one of the 82 rooms. Standard doubles are spacious and decked out in an agreeable, if familiar, contemporary style, with bathrooms tiled in glass and dark marble. Some have views out onto the streets below; inner rooms face a gurgling Zen garden at the bottom of a large light shaft. The psychedelic elevators will thrill the easily amused on the way down to the reception level, which shares space with a serious restaurant and a casual café. The serene Taylife spa on the basement level offers a profusion of treatments, plus high-tech machines that might be more at home at space camp. Service is well-meaning, if a bit wanting in English language skills. The obvious model here is W Hotels—down to the "request anything" button on the telephone. Now that the American chain has opened its own outpost a few blocks away, however, the Sofa will likely need a bit of reupholstering to remain competitive.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Sumahan on the Water
51 Kuleli Caddesi
Çengelköy
Istanbul
Turkey 34684
Tel: 90 216 422 8000
info@sumahan.com
www.sumahan.com

One of Istanbul's most talked-about boutique hotels, the recently refurbished Sumahan on the Water hugs the Asian shore of the Bosphorus in the village of Çengelköy. The building was once a distillery for Raki (the traditional Ottoman ouzolike aperitif), and the meticulous renovations have managed to preserve its original industrial allure while modernizing the interior—with polished wood floors, flat-screen TVs, and, in most rooms, glass-sheathed fireplaces—and retaining a touch of the old Ottoman in the marble bathrooms with hammam-style basins. All 18 rooms have a stunning view—or in loft suites, access to a garden with a view—of the Bosphorus and the Istanbul skyline, framed by the famous suspension bridge joining Europe with Asia. What's the trade-off? It comes down to physics: The distance from town that allows such a great vantage point also means a $20, traffic-heavy cab ride each way, unless you rely on the infrequent public ferries (which don't run past early evening) or the hotel's private launch (five departures daily). For some, especially those visiting Istanbul for a longer period, the sense of seclusion might turn to one of isolation.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Swissôtel the Bosphorus
Bayıldım Caddesi, No:2 Maçka
Beşiktaş
Istanbul
Turkey
Tel: 90 212 326 1100
www.swissotel.com

This "classy and secluded" hotel overlooks the Bosphorus on the former garden of Dolmabahçe Palace. Guest rooms are warm and modern, with rich woods, subtle colors, and "a high-tech panel that controls almost everything." "The business center was closed for the Eid holiday, but the helpful staff opened it for me to check e-mails." Gaja restaurant's panoramic windows have Bosphorus views that "are the real selling point of the hotel."

(600 rooms)

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
W Istanbul
22 Süleyman Seba Caddesi
Beşiktaş
Istanbul
Turkey 34357
Tel: 90 212 381 2121
wistanbulreservations@whotels.com
www.starwoodhotels.com/whotels/property/overview/index.html?propertyID=3028

Istanbul is fast becoming Europe's capital of cool, and its hip-o-meter certainly clocked up a couple more notches with the April 2008 opening of the W in the unlikely (but still central) neighborhood of Beşiktaş. Set in a perfectly preserved four-story 19th-century residence that once housed officers from the nearby Dolmabahçe Palace, the hotel's interior is every bit as modish as its global counterparts, with an extra layer of Ottoman opulence worked in by Istanbul's designer du jour, Mahmut Anlar. Rich black-and-white fabric patterns adorn the upholstery in the purple-tinted downstairs lounge, Sip, while the main bar in the first-floor "Living Room" is crisscrossed with traditional latticework set against the W's signature deep-maroon tones (it's a great spot for pre-dinner cocktails, even if you're not staying here). The smaller standard rooms are ample and cleverly laid out, with bathroom sinks embedded behind cupboards to save on space; try for one on the ground floor for a little private garden, or on the second floor for a funky wooden cabana connected to the room via a walkway. What the W lacks, alas, that other hotels in Istanbul can boast by the bucketful, is the uninterrupted Bosphorus panorama; however, for a view of the newly developed upscale shopping street outside—part of the same development—go for one of the brighter and more spacious "Fantastic" suites.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Witt Istanbul Suites
26 Defterdar Yokuşu
Cihangir
Istanbul
Turkey 34433
Tel: 90 212 393 7900
www.wittistanbul.com/eng/

An advantage of staying at the Witt Istanbul Suites, besides its location in the literati-filled neighborhood of Cihangir, is that everything in it is something you would want for your own home. Turkish design sensations Seyhan Özdemir and Sefer Caglar of Autoban have crafted a 17-suite hotel where form meets function, with comfort to boot. This modest residential '80s building has an unassuming facade with subtle signage, but inside is a fanciful interior of walls patterned in dots, a laser-cut railing on the stairway that leads up to the rooms, oversized lamps, and '50s-inspired leather chairs in soothing earth tones. The service is limited though attentive, and the guest rooms have large living areas with low couches as well as kitchens with mirrored subway tiles and veined marble islands, all suitable for entertaining. The comfortable bed enables deep slumber before the morning's sumptuous self-catered Turkish breakfast spread.

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.