PRINT PREVIEW
send to printer

Concierge.com

Lanai See And Do

Hotel Photo
Challenge at Manele
1 Challenge Drive
Lanai , Hawaii
96763
Tel: 808 565 2222
www.gohawaii.com/stories/stories.html?video=6

The Pacific Ocean is your water hazard on this dazzling Jack Nicklaus–designed golf course. Try not to be distracted as you work your way through: Like the Experience at Koele, the Challenge at Manele has a dramatic signature hole, its 12th, which overlooks a 150-foot cliff drop to Hulopoe Bay and the pounding surf below. Guests of the Hotel Lanai, Lodge at Koele, and Manele Bay receive a discount on greens fees.

Hotel Photo
Experience at Koele
Keomuku Highway
Lanai , Hawaii
96763
Tel: 808 565 4653
www.gohawaii.com/stories/stories.html?video=6

Cool up-country surroundings have influenced the design of the Lodge at Koele's championship golf course, the Experience at Koele. Created by Greg Norman and Ted Robinson, the 163-acre, 18-hole course is lush with wildflowers, banyans, and pines, with terraced water hazards and steep valley gorges. Prepare for a whammy of a 17th hole, which leads to an extraordinary 200-foot drop into Lanai's deepest ravine. Guests of the Hotel Lanai, Lodge at Koele and Manele Bay receive a discount on greens fees.

Garden of the Gods
Keahikawelo , Hawaii
96763

Nothing much grows in Keahikawelo (translated from Hawaiian as "Garden of the Gods"), a desert expanse of red, lavender, and brown dirt. But the spooky Martian barrenness makes a dramatic backdrop for volcanic rock pinnacles shaped by hundreds of years of wind erosion to resemble a rough-hewn tiki. You can walk between the formations, which are scattered around as if placed by a divine force, but be aware that this area is very isolated, and there's no shelter. Use common sense and bring lots of water. To get here, head northwest on Polihua Road from Lanai City. It's only about six miles, but the trip takes 25 minutes because the road is so bumpy, and if there's been rain, it will be muddy. Ask when you rent your jeep if anything is off-limits that day. Go slow for the sake of your kidneys, and look out for vehicles heading in the opposite direction. On the way, you'll drive through the Kanepuu Conservation Area, a native dry-land forest that's home to the endangered Hawaiian gardenia. There's a small sign by the side of the road to mark the beginning of a short self-guided trail. Afterward, you can hike or drive another four miles to two-mile-long, white-sand Polihua Beach, or Kaena Point, an ancient Hawaiian religious site located about a mile southwest of Polihua.

Horseback Riding
Stables at Four Seasons Resort Lanai, Lodge at Koele
1 Keomoku Highway
Lanai City , Hawaii
96763
Tel: 808 565 4555

This well-kept facility reflects the Hawaiian love of horses, which became central to the economy when they were introduced to Lanai in 1803. Located about half a mile from the Lodge, the stable offers trail rides for every level of experience. The Koele trail is good for beginners, while the Paniolo Trail and the Mahana Trail are more challenging. All meander to areas off the main road that are difficult to access otherwise. Expect to see lots of deer, native plants, and birds; untouched land; hidden valleys; and, if you continue to the shore, stretches of coast not accessible to many. Sunset trail rides and "Sweetheart" romance trail rides just for two are among the more creative options. Note that children must be at least nine years of age and four-foot-six to ride, and no person weighing over 225 pounds is allowed on a horse.

Hulopoe Beach
Manele Road
Lanai , Hawaii
96763

This perfect white-sand swath just west of Manele Bay has rocky tide pools and a marine preserve (on the beach's eastern side). Hulopoe is known for its clear, aquamarine waters and exceptional snorkeling and swimming. Thanks to the island's relative isolation and a small human population, Lanai's coral reefs are thriving with parrot fish, sea stars, Barber pole shrimp, and limpets; spinner dolphins and humpback whales have also been known to make guest appearances. On calm days, you can spend all day snorkeling. When there's a swell, check out the small pods of talented local surfers tackling the wickedly challenging shorebreak.

Lanai Pine Sporting Clays and Archery Range
Four Seasons Resort Lanai, Lodge at Koele
1 Keomoku Highway
Lanai City , Hawaii
96763
Tel: 808 565 4060

Even if you don't hunt (or more specifically, would never hunt), you can have fun on this unexpected outing without compromising your ethics. First-timers are sternly instructed on safety guidelines, fitted with lightweight shotguns (to minimize recoil), and given lessons as they proceed with an instructor through the 14 shooting-range stations in this 200-acre pine-wooded valley. The targets are disks, still called "clays" though they're now made of compressed fertilizer that seems to keep the area trees very happy. There are archery and air-rifle ranges, too, on what is now the grandest facility of its kind in the state. Ask the staff which celebrities have visited (Arnold Schwarzenegger and Tom Selleck, for example), and who sucked—they'll tell you.

Lanai Surf School and Surf Safari
428 Lanai Avenue
Lanai , Hawaii
96763
www.lanaisurfsafari.com

Big secret revealed: There's good surf on Lanai and hardly anyone around to take advantage of it (though admittedly, it's not easy to get to). Unless you're a badass who surfs Pipeline every winter, you should book a four-hour surf safari in a four-by-four with this husband-and-wife team. Affable Nick Palumbo was raised on Lanai (so you'll get the local perspective on the best spots for your level), and his wife, Alex, specializes in teaching women and girls. It's a reputable outfit—all the instructors have at least 15 years of surfing experience and are CPR-, first aid–, and Hawaii-lifeguard–certified. Lanai Surf School is also the choice of the Four Seasons. Surfboard and gear rentals are available.

Munro Trail
Follow the signs from Cemetery Road, past the Lodge at Koele
Lanai , Hawaii
96763

Hike along the high ridge to Lanaihale summit, and you'll be rewarded. At 3,370 feet, it's the only place in the state where you can see six Hawaiian islands at once: Lanai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Molokai, Oahu, and the Big Island. You'll wend your way through dense rain forests full of eucalyptus and pine, that open up to vast panoramas of canyons and ocean. Mountain bikers and four-wheel-drive vehicles can also access this dirt trail, named after New Zealand naturalist George Munro, who planted the ubiquitous Cook Island pines to create a watershed for Lanai.

Shipwreck Beach
Northeast end of Highway 44
Lanai , Hawaii
96763

Another four-wheel-drive destination, this eight-mile rocky lava beach is located down a long series of scenic switchbacks on Lanai's northeastern shore. The rusted concrete hull of the 1940s Liberty ship comes into view about halfway down the descent, as does the island of Molokai, a few miles across Kalohi Channel. Due to the unpredictability of these waters, the shallow coral reef just offshore has become the watery grave of several seagoing vessels since the 1800s. From the beach, you'll find trails to old lighthouse ruins and ancient rock petroglyphs.

Spa at Four Seasons Manele Bay
Four Seasons Resort Lanai at Manele Bay
1 Manele Bay Road
Lanai , Hawaii
96763
Tel: 808 565 2088
www.fourseasons.com/manelebay/spa.html

Spa culture is huge in Hawaii—perhaps because there are so many native traditions and botanicals to draw upon—and an expected part of a five-star hotel experience. But until a 10,000-square-foot facility opens at the Lodge at Koele in 2009, the pressure is on this small but decadent 11-room spa, the only one on Lanai. It's (expectedly) tough to snag an appointment in high season for an aromatic Ali'i banana-coconut scrub, a Ki Pola Ko'olu (cooling ti-leaf wrap) with lavender-infused aloe vera gel, a Limu (Hawaiian seaweed) wrap, or a Lomi Lomi massage. (Make your reservation when you book your room.) If they can't squeeze you in, arrange a private after-hours spa party for up to eight people, which includes a 50-minute treatment for each person, followed by pupus served in the relaxation area.

Whale-Watching at Polihua Beach
Polihua Beach , Hawaii
96763

This secluded north shore beach got its name, Polihua (Hawaiian for "egg nest"), from the many sea turtles that once laid eggs on its shores. These days, humpback whales are the predominant animals sighted here during the seasonal migration (December to April). You'll need a four-wheel-drive vehicle to get to the beach, which is a tooth-rattling 12 miles down a rocky dirt road that begins near the Lodge at Koele. Bring lots of water and sunscreen, as there are no beach facilities. Strong currents make the water treacherous for swimmers, but it's a great spot for collecting puka shells and other beach treasures.

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.