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Mexico City Hotels

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Camino Real
700 Mariano Escobedo
Polanco
Mexico City
Mexico 11590
Tel: 800 722 6466 (toll-free)
Tel: 52 55 5263 8888
mexico@caminoreal.com.mx
mexico@caminoreal.com.mx

Although it was built in 1968, the Camino Real still has the feel of a modern grand hotel—maybe because of all the priceless works of art, such as a mural by Rufino Tamayo in the lobby. Located in a quiet, privileged neighborhood, steps from Chapultepec, the hotel's 712 rooms are divided into six "missions" (actually separate wings of the hotel); all have clean lines and sharp corners, and some have sliding-glass windows that open onto balconies. (Avoid low floors with interior views, unless you want to spend all your time in the dark.) Amenities include a gym, a pool, and nine restaurants, including a local branch of Le Cirque.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
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Casa Vieja
45 Eugenio Sue
Polanco
Mexico City
Mexico 11560
Tel: 52 55 5282 0067
sales@casavieja.com
www.casavieja.com

The modest name—which literally means "old house"—doesn't do justice to this ten-suite boutique hotel near Bosque de Chapultepec. There's no subdued mustiness here: The mansion is painted in bold shades of tangerine and persimmon, and the decor in the common areas, which includes flamboyant folk art from all over the country, is over the top (sometimes literally—don't miss the elaborate tiles on the lobby's vaulted ceiling). In the guest suites, which are inspired by the works of Mexican artists, every possible space is filled with hand-carved furnishings and well-chosen antiques. You might not be able to stay in Frida Kahlo's house in Coyoacán, but you can stay in the fantasy version here, done up in the colorful fabrics that she often liked to wear.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Condesa DF
102 Avenida Veracruz
La Condessa
Mexico City
Mexico 06700
Tel: 52 55 5241 2600
info@condesadf.com
www.condesadf.com

Jonathan Morr, the restaurateur (New York's BONDST) and hotelier (Miami Beach's Townhouse), knows what's hip. So it's no wonder that he was drawn to the neighborhood of La Condesa, a spot so hot that he borrowed its name for this hotel. The 1920s neoclassical building is the first—and for the time being only—hotel in La Condesa. Instead of ho-hum minimalism, interior designer India Mahdavi chose a playful mix of styles that combines everything from cowhide-covered banquettes to claw-foot tubs. The hotel—run by the same folks as the Habita—has 40 rooms, some with glass walls opening onto petite terraces. Outside there's a wedge-shaped courtyard, which is the heart of the hotel in every sense. The roof terrace (with a hole for that courtyard) was a hot spot as soon as the place opened in January 2005.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Distrito Capital
37 Juan Salvador Agraz
Santa Fe
Mexico City
Mexico 05300
Tel: 52 55 5257 1300
www.hoteldistritocapital.com

Distrito Capital is the latest venture from the team behind two of Mexico City's hottest hotels, Habita and Condesa DF. Set in the emerging commercial district of Santa Fe, near the Toluca domestic airport, it's ideal for business travelers looking to avoid the traffic of city center, but also for leisure travelers who are passing through the capital on their way to other points in Mexico. The 30-room hotel takes its inspiration from the Park Hyatt Tokyo and other hotels that float above their cities: Rooms occupy the top four floors of an office building, with reception, restaurant, and gym at the bottom. And like the Park Hyatt, Distrito has an international, cosmopolitan swagger. With the exception of the large selection of mezcals at the bar, the sleek and spare hotel wouldn't be out of place in Berlin or London. Rooms are studies in unadorned black (hallways and bathrooms) and white (sleeping areas), with soaring ceilings and large windows with views of Santa Fe and, on the occasional clear day, the volcano Popocatépetl. Ask for a corner room to double the number of views (corner accommodations are suites on higher floors and standard doubles on lower ones). We have only two complaints: First, the black walls and dressers combined with less-than-generous lighting can make it hard to find any dark items, especially if your wardrobe is also a study in basic black. Second, while this hotel could physically pass for, say, a chic Park Hyatt, the service is more warm and well intentioned than it is five-star-flawless. Distrito Capital's restaurant, from chef Enrique Olvera, founder of Pujol, is a big draw: Widely acknowledged as one of the leaders of alta cocina mexicana, Olvera here tries his hand at simpler fare—appropriate for the mood of the eclectic crowd, a mix of businessmen and fixtures of the Mexico City nightlife scene, who party until early in the morning under the glow of the Alvar Aalto lamps.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Four Seasons Hotel Mexico, D.F.
500 Paseo de la Reforma
Juárez
Mexico City
Mexico 06600
Tel: 52 55 5230 1818
reservations.mex@fourseaons.com
www.fourseasons.com/mexico

Resembling an old-fashioned hacienda—if haciendas had soared to eight stories—this hotel wraps around a central courtyard with a fountain that could have been plucked from the zócalo of any Mexican town. The fortresslike walls mean that when you're dining under umbrellas on the shaded terrace or enjoying the view from your own private balcony, there's no noise at all from traffic-clogged Paseo de la Reforma (which runs past the front door). Bosque de Chapultepec, a sprawling park dotted with museums, is within easy walking distance. The 240 rooms and suites are tasteful and elegant, with color schemes of peach, gold, or green; bold fabrics; and dark woods. The service, as you would guess, is polished and professional.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
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Hippodrome Hotel
188 Avenida Mexico
Condesa
Mexico City
Mexico 06100
Tel: 52 55 5212 2110
hippodrome@stashhotels.com
www.thehippodromehotel.com

In an Art Deco building that would look right at home in South Beach, the Hippodrome has a streamlined facade that turns heads. But the beauty here is more than skin deep, as you'll notice in details such as the cage elevator that once graced the Castillo de Chapultepec. The 16 generously sized guest rooms are decorated in warm hues, with chocolate walls and shag throw rugs. The best part may be the bathrooms, which have sinks and shower surrounds fashioned from the same cream-colored stone. Most eye-catching is one of the bathrooms in the penthouse suite, which includes a porcelain whirlpool tub facing a floor-to-ceiling window overlooking a terrace running the length of the building. Stroll outside and you get a great view of the trees in nearby Parque Mexico. The hotel opened in early 2007, a few months after the Hip Kitchen. The restaurant, with a new guest chef serving up a tasting menu every two months, quickly developed a following among the locals in the fashionable La Condesa neighborhood.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Brick
95 Orizaba
La Roma
Mexico City
Mexico 06700
Tel: 52 55 5256 4583
hotelbrick.com

The vibrant bohemian neighborhood of La Roma now has a hotel that lives up to the area's artful flair. Hotel Brick is in two parts: a faithfully restored early-20th-century mansion that houses three suites, and a modern frosted-glass addition with 14 rooms. Choose the original manse if you are looking for classic touches like chandeliers, wooden shutters, and cozy sitting areas (plus views of the tree-filled neighborhood). The dark brown and gray furnishings in the new buildings give rooms a masculine feel. Here, even standard rooms have small balconies, while the penthouse suites have rooftop terraces with whirlpool tubs. The lobby bar looks like a bordello, with chesterfield sofas and red velvet chairs (possibly a nod to the building's rumored past as a brothel). Amenities include a library stocked with Assouline photography books, a skinny outdoor lap pool hidden in the lowest level, and a lush lawn on the mansion's roof. The hotel's restaurants are La Roma's hippest hangouts: Linger over lunch at the terrace restaurant overlooking the sidewalk, or dine inside at the more formal Brasserie La Moderna, overseen by chef Richard Sandoval.—Maribeth Mellin

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hotel Habita
201 Avenida Presidente Masaryk
Polanco
Mexico City
Mexico 11560
Tel: 52 55 5282 3100
info@hotelhabita.com
www.hotelhabita.com

Enrique Norten of TEN Architectos wrapped a '60s-era low-rise in cloudy glass and pared down the 36 rooms to the basic necessities of Dwell readers: smooth gray carpets, a glass shelf the length of one wall, stainless-steel sink, good down and linens on the platform bed, and not much in the way of storage. Off the lobby is Aura, where the food and decor share an Asian sensibility; on the sixth floor is the indoor-outdoor (mostly outdoor) bar Area. The fifth floor houses a small, glass-walled indoor-outdoor gym, plus a pretty pool that nobody uses. Beware: The weekend partying of the fresas (the young, wealthy elite) on said rooftop can leak into the surrounding rooms. The hotel is located in quiet, posh Polanco, steps from the shops and not far from Bosque de Chapultepec.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
La Casona
280 Durango
La Roma
Mexico City
Mexico 06700
Tel: 877 278 8018 (toll-free)
Tel: 52 55 5286 3001
informes@hotellacasona.com.mx
www.hotellacasona.com.mx

Across Paseo de la Reforma from La Condesa—in the less trendy, more authentic, but still lively Colonia Roma area—this turn-of-last-century colonial-style pink mansion has 29 adorable wood-floored rooms. Each is different (they all say that, but here it's true), and decorated with antiques and a music–commedia dell'arte theme: lutes in spotlit niches, violins and accordions instead of paintings. There's also a lounge with a wall of hunting horns, and a restaurant, Piaf, that serves French cuisine. The scant facilities amount to Wi-Fi and a fitness room, but ambience, comfort, and friendliness make up for that.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Las Alcobas
390A Presidente Mazaryk
Polanco Chapultepec
Mexico City
Mexico 11560
Tel: 52 55 3300 3900
www.lasalcobas.com

Tucked unobtrusively in a pleasantly quiet corner of stylish Polanco, Las Alcobas (the Alcoves) feels like a pied-à-terre, with appropriately discreet service and suites meant to impress even the most jaded traveler's senses. An amiable butler presents an Olinalá tray with a choice of handcrafted soaps and provides technical instructions for the room's remote-control drapes and mood lighting. Mexican candies are stacked on a tiny Oaxacan doll's chair, and the fridge is stocked with ToniCol soda; each morning, coffee and pastries are delivered to your room (all included in the rate). Design firm Yabu Pushelberg's dramatic touches in the 35 rooms include oversize blue marble slabs around chromotherapy whirlpool tubs, inlaid leather walls facing platform beds, and a three-way mirror. In the lobby, a winding rosewood staircase adds drama. At the hotel's Dulce Patria restaurant, highly acclaimed chef Martha Ortiz (of Aguila y Sol fame) plays with regional flavors to create chamoy margaritas and mole manchamantel ("table-stainer" mole) with fruity pico de gallo.—Maribeth Mellin

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The St. Regis Mexico City
439 Paseo de la Reforma
Mexico City
Mexico 6500
Tel: 52 55 5228 1818
mexico.city@stregis.com
www.starwoodhotels.com/stregis/property/overview/index.html?language=en_US&propertyID=1735

Sheathed in a gleaming glass-and-steel tower on the Paseo de la Reforma in the banking and embassy district of Polanco, the 189-room St. Regis may seem all business, but its central location and convenient kids' club means it's also a fine choice for leisure travelers. Inside, the decor subtly alludes to Mexico's heritage while gracefully integrating textures and restful colors (shades of gray and taupe with touches of greens and purples) throughout all the interior spaces including the luxuriously comfortable rooms and suites. The dramatically proportioned reception area and King Cole Bar, on the third floor, overlooked by commanding murals by Marc Otela, leads through French doors onto a terrace with inviting seating for casual fare (there are three full-fledged restaurants here and excellent room service as well). The only quibbles are the overly complicated room lighting system and the fact that improperly angled shower drains in the opulent bathrooms are prone to flooding. Service, including the efficient personal butler, is first-rate, but the crowning glory of the St. Regis is its fifteenth floor. Here you can exercise, have spa treatments, swim in the small but beautiful pool, or soak in one of the two hot tubs, all the while enjoying an exhilarating view of mountains from your sanctuary in the sky.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
W Mexico City
252 Campos Eliseos
Polanco
Mexico City
Mexico 11560
Tel: 877 946 8357 (toll-free)
Tel: 52 55 9138 1800
reservations.mexicocity@whotels.com
www.whotels.com/mexicocity

Forget the various shades of gray that distinguish many of this chain's locations. To remind you that you're in Latin America, the W Mexico City is splashed with bordello red. It's the color of the pillows in the lobby, the tables in the Whiskey Lounge, and the chairs in the Cocoa Bar. In the restaurant, Solea, red panels give you a bit of privacy. (But since this is a hipster hangout, the panels are semitransparent, so that you can still see and be seen.) And don't forget the 237 bedrooms, where red walls add a sensuous touch to rooms that otherwise would be a bit sterile. All have up-to-date amenities such as Wi-Fi (for a fee), DVD, and CD players, and a few bizarre—but pleasant—touches such as hammocks in the bathrooms. Big windows mean good views over the greenery of the posh Polanco neighborhood.

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.