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Milan Hotels

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
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3 Rooms
10 Corso Como
Milan
Italy 20154
Tel: 39 02 626 163
info@3rooms-10corsocomo.com
www.3rooms-10corsocomo.com

There can't be many hotels in the world that have catalogs in each room—so you can look up who designed which piece of furniture. But Carla Sozzani, sister of Italian Vogue editor-in-chief Franca, is not just any hotelier. 3Rooms is part of her 10 Corso Como shopping, dining and culture hub, which sprawls across a series of buildings on four sides of a typical, plant-filled Milanese courtyard. The rooms themselves are three private luxury apartments, each with their own separate entrance off the 10 Corso Como courtyard. They look as if they might have come straight out of a history of 20th-century design, and will be best appreciated by those who can spot an Arne Jacobsen armchair at 20 paces. But the mix is far from random: The Verner Panton rugs, Fontana lamps, and Eames bedspreads are matched with a real feel for pattern and color, and the whole thing feels sophisticated and stylish—especially in number 3, the most spot-on suite. Hotel services are fairly minimal (a mobile phone number is provided for after-hours emergencies), but room service and a gourmet breakfast are guaranteed by the eatery downstairs—a popular café-resto that also generates an after-hours hubbub that may disturb light sleepers. In-room facilities stretch from a complete shoeshine kit to an extensive library of books on art and design to a fax machine—though it takes a while just to get the hang of the seven remote-control devices provided in each room. Sozzani has recently opened another 3Rooms in Paris in collaboration with designer Azzedine Alaïa.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
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Antica Locanda dei Mercanti
6 Via San Tomaso
Milan
Italy 20121
Tel: 39 02 805 4080
locanda@locanda.it
www.locanda.it

Good-value accommodation has always been a problem in Italy's most ostentatiously wealthy city—especially in the center of town. Which is why this upmarket guesthouse a five-minute walk from the Duomo is often booked solid. The 14 rooms are simple—some, even basic—but they all have touches of style, which are at their most impressive in the four (more expensive) suites on the top floor. Each has its own design scheme (one looks like a painting by Gustav Klimt), a four-poster bed, and a verdant private terrace. The Locanda shares a reception area with its neighbor, Alle Meraviglie, another charming B&B (8 Via San Tomaso; 39-02-805-1023; www.allemeraviglie.it). The two hotels have kept their own identities and Web sites—though at peak times they will recommend each other. All rooms in both guesthouses have free Wi-Fi broadband access.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
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Armani Hotel Milano
31 Via Manzoni
Milan
Italy 20121
Tel: 39 02 8883 8888
milan@armanihotels.com
milan.armanihotels.com

The 95-room Armani Hotel Milano, a joint venture between Giorgio Armani and Emirates-based Emaar Properties group, occupies floors two through eight of a rationalist palazzo in central Milan. At street level, there's an Armani superstore—a one-stop Giorgio mall of fashion boutiques, café, bookshop, florist, and Nobu restaurant—but the hotel keeps a refreshing distance from the branded retail hoopla below. Discretion, calm, and privacy are the key concepts in a design scheme that nods winsomely, but never brazenly, at the building's 1930s origins. The city view is sliced up and made oddly virtual by sun-screening louvers on all the windows. Inside, marble and semiprecious stone (such as the translucent onyx panels behind the bar) are used not to dazzle but to impose a tone of sober luxury. A palette of earthy taupe, subdued greens, ivory, cream, and black soothes the soul of the stressed urban explorer. Even the smallest rooms feel large, and you could host a small dinner party in the handsome, luxe-minimalist bathrooms. All the sixth-floor rooms have bamboo-fringed balconies, and on the top level is a full-featured spa where you can enjoy a panoramic massage or simply work out with a Duomo view. But it's the seventh-floor Armani/Bamboo Bar and adjacent Armani/Restaurant, with its unfussy Mediterranean fusion menu, that have proved the greatest hits. Locals enjoy the skewed view of their hometown, so if you're planning to eat here, you'll need to book well ahead, even if you're staying at the hotel.—Lee Marshall

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Boscolo Exedra
4–6 Corso Matteotti
Milan
Italy 20121
Tel: 39 02 7767 9611
reservation@boscolo.com
www.boscolohotels.com

The Boscolo group gave post-postmodern Italian architect and interior designer Italo Rota carte blanche to revamp a former bank headquarters on central Corso Matteotti and turn it into a five-star. The result, opened in September 2009, is a playful clash of harlequin patterns, textures, and colors—some will find it bold and glam, others decidedly over-the-top. Things calm down a little in the 154 spacious bedrooms, which mine a rich1970s seam with their bucket chairs, huge fabric lamp shades, and rainbow-shaded shower gels. Downstairs is Milan's biggest hotel spa, designed by Simone Micheli in jaw-dropping Barbarella-meets-Clockwork Orange style. The hotel's Made in Italy mandate, not to mention its ironic flirtation with the down-market, comes through in the Lambruscheria wine bar: Its list centers on the sparkling Lambrusco red wine from Emilia-Romagna that is often (unjustly) considered a cheap party lubricant, and its menu highlights Bologna's hearty bolliti (boiled meats). There's also a pricey seafood restaurant done in disconcertingly shiny black marble. The hotel's stated aim of being open to the city seems to be working, at least around aperitivo time, but if you're staying here, you'll need to weigh the fairground fun of your surroundings against the not always spot-on service and the steep room rates.—Lee Marshall

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
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Bulgari Hotel, Milano
7b Via Privata Fratelli Gabba
Montenapoleone
Milan
Italy 20121
Tel: 39 02 805 8051
info@bulgarihotels.com
www.bulgarihotels.com/

When luxury jeweler Bulgari went into the hotel business, it did so in style, partnering with Ritz-Carlton and opening this discreet exercise in contemporary urban charm in a large town house a short walk from the fashion district. It's the unmatchable location that is the first X factor: The hotel stands at the end of a private, gated cul-de-sac. The second is the hotel's garden, which merges visually with the city's ancient botanical gardens behind. And the third is the interior, which architect Antonio Citterio has turned into what feels like a contemporary gentleman's club that combines minimalism with luxury, largely thanks to the use of rich natural materials. The 58 rooms and suites, suitably subdued in their buffs, creams, and browns, have solid teak balconies (many with garden views), dark oak floors, and oversize polished black Zimbabwe marble and pale travertine bathrooms. The suites are big enough for serious entertaining or business meetings; some of the starter-level superior rooms, on the other hand, are a little cramped. Open since May 2004, the Bulgari has been stealing customers from the old standards (such as the Grand Hotel et de Milan and the Principe di Savoia) with its impeccable service and location—and the added bonus of the downstairs spa, a cool, Milanese Zen haven with a gold mosaic pool and green-glass hammam. The restaurant is by no means a mere style exercise: Young Sardinian chef Elio Sironi's light, seafood-oriented Mediterranean cuisine attracts plenty of non-hotel customers, and the Sunday buffet brunch is currently the hottest ticket in Milan.

$200-$299
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Foresteria Monforte
2 Piazza Tricolore
Milan
Italy 20129
Tel: 39 02 7631 8516
info@foresteriamonforte.it
www.foresteriamonforte.it

A pharmacist (who owns the store downstairs) and a lawyer with a passion for design opened this molto carino three-room B&B in 2005. Well placed for Piazza San Babila and all the fashion and design boutiques, this place was a hit from day one, and it's easy to see why: With its original parquet floors and views of city traffic, this is a typical Milanese apartment, yet it has been given a good deal of character by a sensitive eye for color combinations and a neat interplay between contemporary design pieces (Philippe Starck chairs, Bisazza mosaic tiles) and comfortable antiques. Frette linens, efficient AC, a communal kitchen with tea- and coffee-making facilities, and free Wi-Fi and cable broadband are among the perks. You get a set of keys and are encouraged to treat the place like your own apartment in Milan; the staff consists of one simpatica maid who brings a basic breakfast to your room in the morning. The only downside is the traffic noise that filters through the double glazing; but along with mobile phone ringtones, this is the city's background music.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
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Four Seasons Hotel Milan
6–8 Via Gesù
Milan
Italy 20121
Tel: 39 02 7708 8
Fax: 39 02 7708 5000
www.fourseasons.com/milan

If you can get a room at the Four Seasons during fashion week without booking a year in advance, you're either very rich, very well connected, or, more likely, both. Right in the middle of the Quadrilatero d'Oro fashion district, on a quiet road between the boutique arteries of Via Montenapoleone and Via della Spiga, this former 15th-century convent, which opened as a hotel in 1993, is the last word in discreet luxury, with the impeccable service that one expects of the brand. The style is no-expenses-spared without vulgar excess: rich silks and velvets (including Fortuny fabrics), highly polished pear-wood and cherrywood furniture, Murano chandeliers, and back-heated bathroom mirrors (which won't steam up). The 118 rooms and suites vary a great deal in size and view, and price is not always the best guide: For example, we prefer the charming, light-filled courtyard-view deluxe doubles on the second floor over the more expensive first-floor split-level suites, which are roomy but gloomy. If you really want to splurge, the Brioni Suite is a one-of-a-kind Wunderkammer filled with fabrics, antiques, and artwork selected and styled by former Brioni CEO Umberto Angeloni. The opulent Il Teatro restaurant cooks up a haute mix of traditional and new Italian cuisine; La Veranda, upstairs, is more informal, though still pretty fancy by most people's standards. The only thing missing is a spa, though in-room massages, manicures and pedicures are available.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
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The Gray
6 Via San Raffaele
Milan
Italy 20121
Tel: 39 02 720 8951
info.thegray@sinahotels.it
www.sinahotels.com/eng/thegray_home.htm

This madly modern 21-room hotel opposite the historic Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II mall, hard by the shopping on Via Montenapoleone, opened in mid-2003, setting its cap for the fashion elite. Styled by Guido Ciompi, designer of Gucci boutiques worldwide, the Gray puts its cards on the table as soon as you walk into the small, hushed lobby: A fuchsia daybed is suspended on 12-foot ropes over a polished black Makassar floor next to a textured concrete wall. Further wild effects enliven the guest rooms, each one different from the last—materials such as white ostrich leather, crocodile, steel, and travertine; a duplex suite whose upper floor is accessed by a staircase of iron parallelogram boxes bolted invisibly to the wall; two suites with a private gym (the only workout equipment in the house); three more with giant round Jacuzzis with mini–plasma TVs in the rims. Somehow, though, the net result is playfully chic rather than chaotic, so it's no surprise the Gray kicked off the Milanese trend for high-concept design-centric hotels. The only downside is the lack of public spaces: There's room for a hip mezzanine restaurant, Le Noir, that doubles as the breakfast room, and a tiny bar off the lobby—and that's about it. Guests can use the spa at the nearby Hotel de la Ville (6 Via Hoepli; 39-02-879-1311; www.delavillemilano.com).

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Maison Moschino
12 Viale Monte Grappa
Milan
Italy 20124
Tel: 39 02 29 00 98 58
maisonmoschino@mobygest.it
www.maisonmoschino.com

You might accuse those Moschino people of leaping on the fashion hotel bandwagon in the wake of Ferragamo, Bulgari, and Versace, but there's no denying that this 65-room playhouse, opened in February 2010, is very much in the label's quirky, tongue-in-cheek idiom. The hotel is housed in a long-abandoned 19th-century railway station just around the corner from buzzy Corso Como. As it's a protected historic building, the monotonous gray exterior could not be touched, but this just makes the contrast with the colorful fantasy fashion interior—designed by Moschino creative director Rosella Jardini—all the more enjoyable. Fairy tales in their most tripped-out, Alice-through-the-Looking-Glass form are the inspiration, and rooms are divided into 16 themed categories. Among the options are a Little Red Riding Hood room with a wolf in the bed and a Sweets room complete with an M&M's chandelier and huge pastry-style bed cushions. Standard rooms, which can be small, have pleated headboards that continue up the wall into outsize dresses. Some of the corridors and common spaces reveal blandness beneath the Moschino window dressing, but for the most part, the makeover has a verve that works. A Culti spa and the Clandestino Milano restaurant—the Milanese outpost of maverick chef Moreno Cedroni, Italy's answer to Ferran Adrià—tie the bow on the Maison's stylish package.—Lee Marshall

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
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Park Hyatt Milan
1 Via Tommaso Grossi
Milan
Italy 20121
Tel: 39 02 8821 1234
milano@hyattintl.com
milan.park.hyatt.com

Perfectly located right by the Duomo, La Scala, and the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, the 117-room Park Hyatt went straight onto the essential hotel map of Milan when it opened in October 2003. The second Hyatt (after Paris Place Vendôme) to have been designed by Ed Tuttle, famous for his many Amanresorts, it has spacious proportions and understated richness. Tuttle signatures are natural, autumnal colors and subtly luxe materials (here, travertine with black marble edging, Murano glass, Venetian stucco, silk and velvet upholstery), vast bathrooms (almost as big as the bedrooms), and flattering, calming light effects. It all feels a bit like a modern Roman imperial palace. Add high ceilings, Bang & Olufsen electronics, exclusive Laura Tonatto bath and beauty products, and the biggest standard rooms in town, and you get why this is going down very well with the punters. It doesn't hurt that former Villa d'Este GM Claudio Ceccherelli is in charge. Naturally there's a spa and a gym, the latter open 24 hours a day, and the hotel also offers a free bicycle hire scheme. The gourmet Park Restaurant is a hot ticket during fashion week, while the buffet lunch offered by the more casual Park Bar next door is popular with less-exalted mortals the rest of the year. But the real place to see and be seen is La Cupola, the lobby lounge bar, magnificently crowned by a 30-foot glass cupola: it's second only to the Bulgari Hotel as the place for Sunday brunch in Milan.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
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Principe di Savoia
17 Piazza della Repubblica
Milan
Italy 20124
Tel: 39 02 62301
reservations@hotelprincipedisavoia.com
www.hotelprincipedisavoia.com

Once upon a time, the Principe di Savoia was Milan's number-one luxury hotel. These days, it has plenty of competition from several new kids on the block, among them the Four Seasons and the Park Hyatt, both of which are more centrally situated for the design and shopping action in the Quadrilatero d'Oro. But although it no longer wears the undisputed crown, the Principe, now under the wing of the Dorchester Collection, is still an attractive, classy five-star option that oozes old-fashioned charm—and it's still the hotel of choice for visiting aristocracy and political bigwigs. Many of the latter stay in the enormous Presidential Suite (almost 5,400 square feet), which features three bedrooms, a CCTV surveillance system, a Pompeii-style indoor pool, a Jacuzzi, a sauna, and a Turkish bath; but even below these giddy heights, rooms are opulent, with an abundance of rich fabrics, inlaid marquetry work, brass lamps, and crystal-drop chandeliers. We like the 48 new Mosaic Deluxe guest rooms, done out in a more contemporary idiom, with bright Mediterranean colors and decorative mosaic bathroom panels; however, some of the more traditional suites (such as the Napoleonic-style Elegant Suites) are also extremely desirable. The sheer size of this 401-room behemoth will not suit all, but it does guarantee top-class facilities, including a full-featured spa with indoor pool, a decent modern Italian restaurant, and two bars. It also means that rooms can be found at quiet times well below the official rack rates—online booking rates automatically adjust to reflect demand.

$199 or less
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Radisson Blu Hotel Milan
24 Via Villapizzone
Milan
Italy 20156
Tel: 39 02 3631 888
info.milan@radissonblu.com
www.radissonblu.com/hotel-milan

At the end of 2009, the Chedi was taken over by the Rezidor group and rebranded as the Radisson Blu. Apart from a welcome drop in price, little else has changed. With its cool, Asian-tinged decor, this 250-room "urban resort" features a quality fusion restaurant; an excellent spa; a long, slim indoor pool with attached sauna, hammam, and gym; and two executive floors with luxurious rooms (540 square feet) and extra services (including a personal butler). The chill-out bedrooms are done in a Bali-meets-Ikea idiom calculated to soothe the overworked business travelers that make up much of the hotel's clientele; don't sniff at the basic deluxe doubles, which are as roomy as many city-center suites. Free Wi-Fi, conference and meeting facilities, and a 40-room long-stay annex (the Virtus Club) are other baits set out to tempt the hotel's core market. The former industrial area of Bovisa, where this property is situated, isn't central—but it's convenient to the Fiera Milano trade fair complex, and it's beginning to attract a loft-dwelling population of creative types.—Updated by Lee Marshall

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
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Resentin
24 Via Mercato
Milan
Italy 20121
Tel: 39 380 4666 659
info@resentin.it
www.resentin.it

When historic grapperia (grappa bar) Resentin was reopened as a restaurant and aperitivo bar in September 2008 by pop star Eros Ramazzotti and a business partner, regulars (who have included Umberto Eco and Domenico Dolce) were relieved to find that the sober mahogany decor had been preserved, and that the cuisine was trad rather than rad. The big change was upstairs, where four charming guestrooms have been created, adding Resentin to Milan's growing list of small but charming contemporary locande. Stairs lead down to the bar-restaurant, but there's external access, too. Rooms are done up in soft beiges, browns, and creams, in a pleasing modern-retro idiom straight out of the pages of a home decorating magazine. There's satellite TV, free Wi-Fi, and Acqua di Parma beauty products in the bathrooms. A breakfast featuring plenty of fresh fruit and just-baked brioches is served in the bar. At a starting price of around €290 ($375) for a double, Resentin is not as cheap as some other new-wave guesthouses—but you're very in with the in crowd here, and the location, halfway between the Duomo and Corso Como, could hardly be better.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
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The Straf
Via San Raffaele 3
Milan
Italy
Tel: 39 2 805081
reservations@straf.it
www.straf.it

The Zen-inspired Straf—slang for St. Rafael, the property's couldn't-be-better location—is about as minimalist as you can get and still have all the comforts of a fine hotel. Designer Vincenzo de Cotiis used industrial materials (concrete, metal, slate) in the 66 rooms, but gauzy linen throws and lots of mirrors soften the look. Wireless Internet access and flat-screen TVs provide entertainment, and the luxe accessories include plush bathrobes and Marie Danielle toiletries. The Straf's svelte black-clad staff are friendly and knowledgeable, and the adjoining Straf Bar is a popular place for fashionistas to stop for a light lunch or an aperitivo.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
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Town@House Street
33 Via Goldoni
Milan
Italy 20129
Tel: 39 02 91437635
info@townhousestreet.com
www.townhouse.it/thstreet

Edgy and experimental, like the rest of Milan's Townhouse empire (the portfolio includes Townhouse 31, next door, and the luxurious Seven Stars Galleria), the Town@House Street is an homage to both pop art and functional design. The four-room property fuses practicality and fun, with touches like a kitchenette set behind sliding mirrored doors; a TV that hangs horizontally over the bed, the screen set in a bright-colored fiberglass structure that doubles as the headboard; a vintage photo of Milan that wraps around the room; and a podlike bathroom like something from a deluxe space shuttle. For some, the fact that the door opens directly onto the street (hence the name) might be off-putting. But for most, a setting right out of a design magazine, a friendly and professional staff (shared with Townhouse 31), and a reasonable price make this an attractively chic option.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
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Townhouse 31
31 Via Goldoni
Milan
Italy 20129
Tel: 39 02 70 156
townhouse31@townhouse.it
www.townhouse.it

This lemon-yellow late-19th-century palazzina, with 18 rooms and suites, is located in a residential neighborhood in the eastern suburbs, but it's thankfully only a 20-minute walk or quick cab ride from the commercial center and fashion district, because the denizens of that world make up the hotel's core clientele. Interiors (by Italian Architectural Digest editor Ettore Mochetti) are suitably chic, in monotone cream with black-stained wood, palm trees in clean ceramic pots, and occasional Oriental artifacts. Overall, the vibe is hip, young, and friendly: The staff may not be trained in the grand-hotel school, but they're eager, helpful, and multilingual. The lobby lounge doubles as a breakfast room, with a communal long, high table (à la Schrager), and also doubles as a favorite local aperitivo venue in the evening—especially in summer, when the entrance courtyard becomes a tented chill-out space, halfway between the Arabian Nights and an Argentinian gaucho camp. The shabby-chic rooms can seem quite subdued after the downstairs styling, but they're comfortable and—for such a fashionista place—surprisingly good value. The Town House empire has recently expanded to include Town House 12, a more business-oriented option in the northern suburbs, and the Town House Galleria, opened in February 2007, which is the first hotel to be located (at least partly) inside the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
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Town House Galleria
Via Silvio Pellico 8
Milan
Italy
Tel: 39 02 701 56

The Town House Galleria aims for "seven star" status—whatever that means—and despite the stiff rates, the hotel certainly scores high for an unparalleled location inside the city's iconic Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II. A doorman at the discreet entrance of this 1860s palazzo allows only registered guests upstairs to the 24 suites, most of them duplexes. The decor is unexpectedly restrained, with taupe walls, original oak-parquet floors, and great photos of old Milan; the focus is on the double-height windows that look out into the historic shopping arcade. But the level of service is the true standout. Your dedicated butler expertly handles everything from preparing customized business cards and brewing tea before bed to putting away your purchases while you're at dinner (the best table is booked for you, of course). He can even arrange airport pickup in a Bentley or the loan of a Damiani necklace, should you wish it. You might never have considered needing a butler, but by the time you check out—with all your clothes neatly packed in tissue paper—you'll wonder how you ever managed to live without one.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Watttredici
13 Via Watt
Milan
Italy 20143
Tel: 39 02 8915 9244
info@watttredicihotel.com
www.watttredicihotel.com

Budget-conscious trendsetters should bookmark this striking four-star 87-room hotel in the far eastern reaches of the Navigli—an area known for its industrial canals and vivacious eating and drinking scene. At times other than fashion week and the Salone del Mobile, classic doubles can be nabbed here for as little as €69 ($90) a night, including a generous buffet breakfast. And once you've mastered the no. 2 tram or the 74 bus, it's actually not that far to the Porta Genova transport hub and the Duomo. The lobby, with its scattering of designer sofas, goes for a clean, white minimalist look, thawed out by rotating art exhibitions. Rooms are warmer, working variations on masculine browns and creams, and (given the price) surprisingly well appointed, with flat-screen TVs, crisp cotton bed linens, and complimentary Fragonard products in the bathrooms. There's no restaurant, but that's not really a problem in this neighborhood.

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.