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New York Hotels

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
1708 House
126 Main Street
Southampton , New York
11968
Tel: 631 287 1708
1708house@hamptons.com
www.1708house.com

Located at the top of Main Street, this 12-room B&B is in the thick of Southampton's affluence (Saks Fifth Avenue is next door) but also an unstuffy retreat from it. The guest rooms ramble around the original 18th-century house, which has additions from each of the three subsequent centuries. Rooms are individually decorated with floral bedspreads, Oriental carpets, and antiques; innkeepers Skip and Lorraine Ralph recently installed flat-screen TVs. Exposed timbers and a canopy bed lend a rustic atmosphere to room 2, a two-room suite, while room 3 is popular for its claw-foot tub and reading alcove. The stone-walled wine cellar (circa 1648, predating the house) is a cozy setting for an evening game of chess. There's no on-site restaurant, although there are many places to dine within walking distance; self-catering types can book one of the two two-bedroom cottages in the back garden that come with a kitchen, spacious living room, and porch.—Updated by Darrell Hartman

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
60 Thompson
60 Thompson Street
New York City , New York
10012
Tel: 877 431 0400
Tel: 212 431 0200
info@thompsonhotels.com
www.60thompson.com

Thomas O'Brien of Aero Studios, based right here in Soho, designed this hotel to be the last word in urban sophistication. What he came up with are deadpan neutral color palettes—all browns and grays with clean-lined furniture—with suede headboards and velour pillows adding a dash of sensuality. Rooms can be small, and most have showers only; ask for one of the few rooms with a tub when booking. Of course, you could go ahead and request the duplex-penthouse Thompson Loft for soaring ceilings, a four-poster bed, a stone fireplace, and two private roofdecks for panoramic views. In summer, the semiprivate rooftop bar A60 presents the same glorious prospect. In the lobby, there's the showy, romantic Thombar and a very good Thai restaurant, Kittichai, which draws a glamorous crowd.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
70 Park Avenue
70 Park Avenue at 38th Street
Midtown East
New York City , New York
10016
Tel: 877 707 2752 (toll-free)
Tel: 212 973 2400
www.70parkave.com

Owing to a location in mostly residential Murray Hill, Manhattan's first Kimpton hotel is too far north to share in downtown's cachet and too far south to be in the thick of Midtown's bustle. It's best suited to travelers looking to be close to—but not amid—the action. In 2003, the 205 guest rooms profited from an overhaul by Jeffrey Bilhuber, whose celebrity clients have included David Bowie and (gasp) Anna Wintour. The results: streamlined blond wood furnishings, woven wallpaper, and silky cream and celadon fabrics. Plasma TVs, L'Occitane products, and irons round out the in-room extras, though you'll probably have to do-si-do around your partner to get around an open ironing board in the small rooms. There's Wi-Fi throughout, and two laptops are available for guests' use in the dimly lit, minimalist lobby, with its modular leather sofas. Silverleaf, the on-site tavern, is a good place for a martini (or a light meal: grilled salmon, crab cakes), but strolling four blocks north, to tip a few at Grand Central's Campbell Apartment, is an equally excellent idea.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Abingdon Guest House
21 Eighth Avenue
West Village
New York City , New York
10014
Tel: 212 243 5384
abingdon@msn.com
www.abingdonguesthouse.com

A great find and your only real option for staying in the West Village. These nine rooms split between two Hudson Street brownstones are full of romantic touches—some have four-poster beds with canopies, hand-painted armoires, and exposed brick walls. What they don't have is an elevator, so be prepared to climb (four of the rooms are located two flights up). This is partly why the Ambassador room is so popular—besides being the largest, and being equipped with a kitchenette, it's also on the ground floor. The Garden Room, another favorite, is one flight down, on the same level as a small, private garden and a gurgling fountain. When selecting your room, bear in mind there's an architectural quirk: Rooms fronting sometimes noisy Eighth Avenue have en-suite bathrooms; those facing the back have a bathroom that's private but located across the hall. (The courtyard-facing Ambassador is the exception to this rule.)

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
A Butler's Manor
244 N. Main Street
Southampton , New York
11968
Tel: 631 283 8550
innkeepers@abutlersmanor.com
www.abutlersmanor.com

Co-owner Chris Allen worked as a butler for 20 years in the U.S. and Europe; no surprise, then, that he and his wife, Kim, get so many details right at this five-room B&B, from the abundance of pillow options to the cream sherry offered to guests upon arrival. At first glance, their shingled, 19th-century yellow house, located just off Southampton's main drag, is heavy on Victorian touches: The front room contains a functioning upright piano and displays of vintage dolls. But there's nothing period about the spacious bathrooms (particularly the luxurious one in the Eton Court room) or the individually adjustable bedroom air-conditioning. Each of the guest rooms is named and themed after an estate Mr. Allen has worked at, and the homey, genteel furnishings range from a sleigh bed and hand-stitched quilts to antique armoires and writing desks. After a breakfast of homemade muffins and fresh-squeezed orange juice, it's tempting to repair to the leafy patio, where a stone walkway begins that will lead you past daffodils and hydrangeas to a saltwater pool. Another thoughtful touch: The fresh flowers that the Allens grow there, alongside a variety of herbs and vegetables, find their way into guest rooms every day.—Darrell Hartman

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Ace Hotel New York
20 W. 29th Street
New York City , New York
10001
Tel: 212 679 2222
enquire.nyc@acehotel.com
www.acehotel.com/newyork

Located in one of the few ungentrified stretches of a transitional downtown neighborhood that's at the center of nothing but close to everything (Chelsea, Midtown), the 260-room Ace has a bona fide cool vibe—best personified by its buzzy lobby, a public living room that has the look of a '50s-era boarding school common room and is filled at all hours with muss-haired hipsters. The prep school aesthetic extends to the cozy rooms, which are stocked with retro details like Pendleton blankets, coarse carpets, and pencil sharpeners (some come with turntables and full-size Smeg refrigerators). Despite the flat-screen TVs and Wi-Fi access, the hotel's ethos is happily analog: Instead of dimmer lights, there are gooseneck lamps, and in place of digital do-not-disturb buttons there are black magnets reading not now. The Ace isn't for guests who need a lot of attention or amenities—the hotel assumes a certain familiarity with the city, and the staff, while sweet, can be a little hapless. But the rates are reasonable, the restaurant—April Bloomfield's gastropub The Breslin—is a hot spot, the two in-house lifestyle boutiques are smartly curated, and the place is already beloved by Manhattanites.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Andaz Fifth Avenue
485 Fifth Avenue
Midtown East
New York City , New York
10017
Tel: 212 601 1234
info.5thavenue@andaz.com
newyork.5thavenue.andaz.hyatt.com/hyatt/hotels

Set in a gut-renovated 1916 building directly across from the New York Public Library, Andaz 5th Avenue is the fifth outpost of Hyatt's hybrid lifestyle-business brand, and arguably its best. As early as check-in it's apparent this isn't your typical corporate Midtown hotel: Laptop-toting staffers prowl the lobby to welcome arriving guests with coffee, wine, or springwater before escorting them to rooms, whose complimentary amenities—Wi-Fi, minibar, local calls—are also appreciated perks. In fact, the 184 rooms, with 12-foot ceilings, massive windows, and spacious bathrooms that make even standard king rooms feel luxuriously oversized, are the hotel's strongest selling point. Designer Tony Chi deploys a muted and refined color palette—as well as dark-stained poplar—reminiscent of his Park Hyatt Shanghai and Asiate restaurant at the Mandarin Oriental New York. His biggest coup here: some of the coolest (and biggest) rain showers in town, in travertine marble and outfitted with mini-baths to soothe sore feet after a day of pavement pounding. The service is warm and welcoming throughout, including at the Bar Downstairs, which hasn't quite captivated the downtown cocktail crowd despite a solid effort, and at The Shop, the no-reservations lobby restaurant whose market-driven menu has Manhattan suits lunching en masse.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Baker House 1650
181 Main Street
East Hampton , New York
11937
Tel: 631 324 4081
info@bakerhouse1650.com
www.bakerhouse1650.com

East Hampton's Arts and Crafts–style Baker House is the most luxurious inn on the East End—and the most expensive. Rates soar to $950 (main house) and $1,750 (cottages) per night in the summer, but you do get what you pay for. The spacious Gardiner Suite—our favorite of the five original rooms—has a wood-burning fireplace, a two-person spa tub, and mullion windows overlooking the walled English gardens and the hotel's elegant infinity pool. The divine Maidstone Room counters with a sleigh bed and views of East Hampton's village green. Two guest suites are located in what was once the property's carriage house; outfitted with bamboo post beds and slate floors, this newer wing has a modern feel. Massages, facials, and body treatments are available in the guests-only spa (there's also an indoor pool, sauna, and steam showers), and guests receive coveted parking passes for East Hampton's nearby strands, such as Main Beach and Georgica. The well-stocked library and honor bar contribute to the sense of staying at a friend's glorious country home—that is, a well-connected friend who can help you secure reservations for the top tables in town.—Updated by Darrell Hartman

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Bowery Hotel
335 Bowery
East Village
New York City , New York
10003
Tel: 212 505 9100
info@bohonyc.com
www.theboweryhotel.com

The flophouses and drug dens of Bowery past have long been supplanted by boutiques and bars, but the new occupants still pay homage to the neighborhood's rakish past. Take the Bowery Hotel, which opened in 2007. Bathrooms with marble slabs and brass fixtures feel old-money New York, but in some, tubs-for-two sit next to exhibitionist floor-to-ceiling windows. The lobby bar's worn leather club chairs and salvaged church pews hold a rotating cast of models and media types under the influence of two-too-many vodka gimlets. But if the Bowery Hotel is a scene, it's a relatively unassuming one. Italian restaurant Gemma has all of the culinary chops of its downtown peers with none of the pretension (prices are reasonable and reservations a breeze for hotel guests). The decadent neo-boudoir style of the common spaces carved sandstone fireplaces, velvet-covered stools, fringed lampshades is offset by the more modern edge of the 135 rooms, with floor-to-ceiling factory windows and pillowy white-on-white beds. You won't get coddled at the Bowery eye-candy doormen are often too busy flirting to actually open the doors, and there is nary a spa, gym, or pool to be found but you will find a good-looking crowd and a comfortably lush place to lay your head when you're ready to escape it.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Bryant Park Hotel
40 West 40th Street
Midtown West
New York City , New York
Tel: 877 640 9300 (toll-free)
Tel: 212 869 0100
www.bryantparkhotel.com

Close to the Seventh Avenue showrooms and just across the street from Bryant Park, the former location of New York's fashion shows, this modern hotel remains popular with the style crowd. Designed by British architect David Chipperfield, the rooms are lean and sharp with blond wood furniture and Tibetan rugs. Thankfully, a bedside sound machine helps block the rumble of midtown's streets. Expect to spot models and model wannabes everywhere, from the hip L.A. restaurant transplant Koi, located in the lobby, to the basement Cellar Bar.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
c/o The Maidstone
207 Main Street
East Hampton , New York
11937
Tel: 631 324 5006
info@themaidstone.com
www.careofhotels.com/maidstone

Formerly a creaky bed-and-breakfast, the Swedish-owned Maidstone 2.0 is a serious contender for most appealingly forward-looking hotel in the Hamptons. Decorator Nadia Tolstoy has given each of the 16 rooms a distinctive, borderline theatrical personality inspired by a specific Scandinavian notable. The gothic Edvard Munch room, with its brooding color scheme and leather canopy armchairs, for example, is not for everyone. The Astrid Lindgren, named after the author of the Pippi Longstocking tales, is decidedly more upbeat, with colorful striped curtains and a zigzag-patterned coverlet. The original inn's paper-thin walls and charmingly lumpy floors remain, albeit clad in brilliantly patterned Svenskt Tenn textiles. The PlayStation 3, potted plant, Coyuchi linens, hand-painted clogs (available for sale), free purified water, and Malin + Goetz amenities that come standard in each room strike a balance between chic and sensible, as does the hotel's willingness to let you borrow a preloaded iPod or a vintage Kronan bike. The on-site Living Room restaurant combines Hamptons glamour with Scandinavian cool. None of this comes cheaply, of course, not least of which the three spacious cottages in the back, which go for $1,175–$1,300 per night in summer.—Darrell Hartman

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Carlyle
35 E. 76th Street
Upper East Side
New York City , New York
10021
Tel: 212 744 1600
thecarlyle@rosewoodhotels.com
www.thecarlyle.com

The most pedigreed of the Upper East Side hotels, this grande dame opened originally as a residential hotel in 1930, with composer Richard Rodgers as its first occupant. Over the years, every president and practically every celebrity and world leader has checked in behind its white-glove wall of discretion (so leakproof that only many years later did word come out about JFK's trysts with Marilyn Monroe here). Café Carlyle, longtime home to the late Bobby Short, still draws a stellar lineup of cabaret talent (including Woody Allen and his band on the Mondays he's in town), while Bemelmans Bar, one of Manhattan's swankiest boîtes, is enlivened by Loston Harris, a suave, talented pianist and singer. The 122 rooms, however, are a mixed bag: As designed by late society decorators Mark Hampton and Dorothy Draper in Empire and Louis XVI fashion, they're a little stiff and old fashioned, but renovations are underway (the hotel was taken over by the Rosewood group in 2000). The 59 additional suites are not to be sniffed at, with their grand pianos and even grander views of Central Park. Even if playing Chopsticks is the extent of your skill, opt for one of these.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Chambers
15 West 56th Street
Midtown West
New York City , New York
10019
Tel: 866 204 5656 (toll-free)
Tel: 212 974 5656
www.chambershotel.com

A far more overt attempt than the subtler City Club to bring downtown style to midtown, this 77-room hotel owes its soul to art, with 500 contemporary works exhibited throughout the hotel. In keeping with the theme, rooms are designed as open-plan artists' lofts—rich artists, presumably, to be able to afford such a prime location just off Fifth Avenue. The showiest is a duplex suite with a 750-square-foot terrace. Furnishings are contemporary but not stridently so. Red rugs on polished wood floors and gold or purple velvet seating warm the spaces. David Chang's Má Pêche restaurant, added in 2010, is the easiest way to sample dishes from the Momofuku chef without the notorious wait or reservation policy.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Chatwal
130 W. 44th Street
Midtown West
New York City , New York
10036
Tel: 212 764 6200
Fax: 212 764 6222
www.thechatwalny.com

A top-to-bottom refit of the Lambs Club, the historic thespian hangout in the heart of Midtown's Theater District, by designer Thierry Despont, has turned this actors' den into a sleek 83-room hotel with Art Deco lines and ocean liner-inspired fittings that hark back to travel's bygone eras. (The wonderfully accommodating service throughout—is there anything the house butler can't do?—is another throwback we love.) A small but richly furnished lobby gives way to the Lambs Club restaurant, an 80-seater from chef Geoffrey Zakarian where the focal point would be the original stone fireplace if it weren't for the story lines unfolding at the other tables. Rooms are fitted with gorgeous steamer trunk-like wardrobes and desk-vanity combos in chocolate leather, while bathrooms come with wall-to-wall mirrors and rain showers stocked with custom Asprey amenities. Guests can find a break at the cozy Lambs Club Bar, hidden away above the lobby, and at the underground, three-treatment-room spa, with a clever "endless" lap pool and small gym—probably the only place on the property where you can let them see you sweat.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
City Club
55 W. 44th Street
Midtown West
New York City , New York
10036
Tel: 212 921 5500
www.cityclubhotel.com

Downtown chic comes to midtown courtesy of hotelier Jeff Klein's renovation of a century-old men's club. It's meant to be very private and it is; there's no lobby to speak of, just a limestone walkway and an elevator leading to the 65 smallish rooms and suites, whose niftiest feature are the TVs hidden behind two-way mirrors: When switched on, the image seems to come from the great beyond. Go for one of the duplex suites, if only for the ceiling, an ornate masterpiece of carved plaster from the original club. Daniel Boulud's ground-floor restaurant, DB Bistro Moderne, ups the room-service quotient.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Crosby Street Hotel
79 Crosby Street
Soho
New York City , New York
10012
Tel: 212 226 6400
crosby@firmdale.com
www.firmdale.com/index.php?page_id=31

The first export from British boutique hotelier Firmdale, the Crosby Street Hotel wears its origins with pride, from the pages of Brit comic book The Beano used in the lobby's art to pedestal sinks stamped "Made in Great Britain" in the bathrooms. Anyone familiar with Kit Kemp's interiors at the Soho, Haymarket, and Covent Garden hotels in London will recognize her trademark pairings of bold stripes, subtle florals, period dressers, and modern artwork in the Crosby's 86 individually designed rooms. The floor-to-ceiling windows with cushioned window seats are custom-made for classic (and surprisingly open) NYC views of roof gardens and lots of low-rise, 19th-century cast-iron architecture, especially from the upper floors of the 11-story building. Things are toned down in the granite-tile bathrooms, which have roomy showers—for the addition of a tub and bidet, book one of the hotel's 11 suites. Downstairs, there's a lush drawing room in scarlet with lots of artwork of dogs (small, well-behaved pets are welcome), a pretty courtyard with a petrified tree at its center, a well-equipped gym, and a cinema (dinner-and-a-movie events are held on Sunday nights). The Crosby Bar (and restaurant), which serves classic American and British dishes, is an eccentrically styled space with psychedelic crystal lights, a wall of vintage telephones, and a touch of taxidermy. Not surprisingly, it's frequented by arty professionals who, along with visiting Brits and clotheshorses on a Soho shopping mission, look likely to remain the Crosby Street Hotel's main clientele.—Nicola McCormack

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Duane Street Hotel
130 Duane Street
New York City , New York
10013
Tel: 212 964 4600
info@duanestreethotel.com
www.duanestreethotel.com

The only public space at this quietly hip newcomer is the sleek, narrow lobby, whose lounge is far too small for entourages, let alone paparazzi. With one bold red parenthesis of a banquette and a few dashes of cushioned benches, it is just big enough for a few people to meet before dinner at adjoining 'BeCa, which has an Italian-leaning menu notable not only for its quality but also for its ample portions and reasonable prices (a dish of gnocchi, $14). Compact as a yacht, the hotel anchors the workaday corner of Church and Duane streets, surrounded by TriBeCa's evolving mix of superb restaurants and old take-out joints, cutting-edge shops and discount clothing stores. Light floods the 45 guest rooms, which tend to be small but quiet. Done in cheerful green chartreuse with blond wood, they display quality details, from faux-stone bath tiles to generous white Mama Bear bedding. The darkly elegant hallways, with glowing silver panels inset in mauve walls, epitomize this fine new property, which clearly—and wisely—values privacy over flash-in-the-pan popularity.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
East Deck Motel
40 Deforest Road
Montauk , New York
11954
Tel: 631 668 2334
www.eastdeckmotel.com

This 28-room 1950s beachfront motel is a long way (both geographically and otherwise) from the New England-y B&B-style inns of the Hamptons proper, which is exactly how the devoted regulars like it. This is definitely a no-frills, un-Hamptons experience: There are no high-thread-count sheets, Bulgari soaps, or any shampoo at all, for that matter—just simple (and, notably, un-air-conditioned) motel accommodations. Some rooms have kitchenettes, which is helpful, since there's no on-site restaurant, and the village of Montauk is a mile to the east. What is right out the door is the area's best surf break, Ditch Plains, meaning that even if the hotel's in crowd of photographers and barefoot media types can't swim in the water, the cool factor remains high. Book A12, a beach-facing room in the back corner, if you can.—Updated by Darrell Hartman

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
East Hampton Point
295 Three Mile Harbor Road
East Hampton , New York
11937
Tel: 631 324 9191
Fax: 631 324 3751
www.easthamptonpoint.com

East Hampton Point gets high marks for its family-friendliness, resortlike amenities, and proximity to busy Three Mile Harbor. Located a five-minute drive from East Hampton's center, in the comparatively modest, woodsy neighborhood of Springs, East Hampton Point consists of seven suites and 13 cottages. The spare suites are tastefully decorated in muted blues with dark-wood furniture and have plasma-screen televisions, large bathrooms, and private entrances. Book an adjacent sitting room for more space, or to link suites. (Suite 6 also has a private second-floor terrace.) The cottages are homier, with two-burner kitchenettes and private patios protected by privet hedges. For entertainment, there's a pool, tennis court, playground, and the marina-all rarities in the Hamptons, given the prohibitive cost of real estate. The on-site restaurant serves New American cuisine. If you plan on dining elsewhere, ask the front desk to make a reservation—the hotel proprietors are also co-owners of the popular East Hampton restaurants Citta Nuova and 1770 House.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Four Seasons Hotel New York
57 E. 57th Street
Midtown East
New York City , New York
10022
Tel: 212 758 5700
Fax: 212 758 5711
www.fourseasons.com/newyorkfs

You can feel the city's surging pulse from the moment you walk into I.M. Pei's soaring, minimalist marble lobby. More buzz hums from the power talk overheard at teatime in the ground floor lounge. Always smooth, the Four Seasons service attains an entirely different level here: The concierges can do the impossible, and this being New York City, they are asked to do so on an hourly basis. The 57th and Park location is central-central, and the 364 rooms are bright, with silk-lined walls and furniture of English sycamore. Aim high, if you can: Floors 40 and above have views of either the southern skyline or Central Park, to the north. The two Presidential Suites on the 51st floor, one facing in each direction, have been outfitted by society designer Peter Marino to feel luxuriously residential. And the forthcoming 52nd-floor suite is destined to be the most impressive in New York, with 23-foot-tall windows offering 360-degree views of Manhattan. Even if you're not staying here, come for L'Atelier de Joël Robuchon. The famed Parisian chef's entrée into the New York dining scene (and currently its hottest ticket), offers up casual-but-intricate Mediterranean-style dishes in a black-and-red space.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Gansevoort Park Avenue
420 Park Avenue S.
Midtown East
New York City , New York
10016
Tel: 212 317 2900
info@gansevoortpark.com
www.GansevoortPark.com

Although not the catalyst for the NoMad (North of Madison Park) neighborhood's trend-cendence—that honor goes to the nearby Ace Hotel—the Gansevoort Park Avenue, opened in February 2011, is ably riding the crest alongside its neighbor with a similar everything-in-one urban resort concept. Albeit with a different crowd: more overseas expense account than hipster trust fund. Purple chandeliers dominate an impressive three-story lobby that's been outfitted in a glam clash of textures, patterns, and colors: oversize houndstooth wingbacks, black-and-white zigzag tiling, a sea-foam settee. The 249 generously sized rooms and suites (street or courtyard views; some with private balconies, all with free Wi-Fi) tone it down with creams and whites, though shocks of hot magenta and electric blue play off oversaturated, slightly naughty photographs of a couple romping in Central Park; PG rooms are available by request. There's an Exhale Spa, stocked gym, trendy Italian fare at Ristorante Asellina, an in-house Cutler Salon, and (by now a hallmark of the Gansevoort brand) a heated rooftop pool. At night, the rooftop transforms into the trilevel Plunge Rooftop Bar and Lounge, with Empire State Building views, wraparound balconies, and stiletto-heeled women in itty-bitty skirts. It all feels Miami by way of Madison Avenue, with a bar scene that bumps accordingly.—Justin Ocean

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Gramercy Park Hotel
2 Lexington Avenue
New York City , New York
10010
Tel: 212 920 3300
reservations@gramercyparkhotel.com
www.gramercyparkhotel.com

Artist Julian Schnabel oversaw the Gramercy Park Hotel's more-is-more decor when Ian Schrager took over (Schrager has since moved on to other projects). Schnabel's choices are heavy, even brooding, and decidedly Old World: studded Spanish hope chests; tapestry-covered, tasseled chairs; red velvet drapes; quilted velvet headboards. The lobby is dominated by black and white Moroccan tiles in a checkerboard pattern, an impressive coffered ceiling, and a massive crystal chandelier. The overall look sounds severe, but it's leavened by lighter touches (Jean Prouvé–inspired lamps, archival photographs) and by a fantastic art collection, including huge pieces by Twombly, Warhol, Basquiat, Hirst, and Schnabel himself. The 185 rooms are painted in one of three palettes—jade green, powder blue, or pale red—and have overstuffed furniture, windows that open partway, and generally good views. Spring for a larger one, such as the 950-square-foot Gramercy suites: The smaller "superior" rooms are just large enough to pace in and can be overwhelmed by all that red velvet. Service is efficient to only occasionally officious. So, does it all warrant the minimum $500-something-a-night tariff? That partly depends on if you're willing to pay to be with the in crowd. The door policy at the Rose and Jade bars is heavily enforced, though not surly, and even hotel guests need a reservation after 9 pm. The upsides are that the spaces are never overflowing, and the Rose Bar is inviting with its fireplace and a red-felt pool table (free).

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Greenwich Hotel
377 Greenwich Street
Tribeca
New York City , New York
10013
Tel: 212 941 8900
reservations@thegreenwichhotel.com
thegreenwichhotel.com

When a megawatt Hollywood star and one of Manhattan's most famous hoteliers (Ira Drukier of Mercer fame) join forces for a new project in Tribeca, you'd expect a flashbulb spot as sceney as area favorites like Nobu. But when that star is the notoriously private Robert De Niro, a different picture emerges. A night at the Greenwich Hotel feels more like a stay at a cultured friend's city manse. Worn Tibetan rugs cover Italian terra-cotta floors, Taschen design books sit on Moroccan marble side tables, and shabby chic wardrobes contrast with brushed metal consoles. Each of the 88 rooms, which start at 325 square feet, is unique, and the eclectic, well-edited assortment of objets—a Buddha head here, a branch of coral there—give the property a lived-in feel. The one decorative constant? Paintings by De Niro's son, Raphael (and yes, they're good). The Greenwich gives you a local's perspective on the neighborhood: This is more the Tribeca of art-filled lofts and stroller-packed brunch spots than the Tribeca of scenesters and velvet-rope restaurants. The service complements that vibe, feeling at once welcoming and discreet: Check-in is handled in your room, fresh fruit awaits your arrival, and the free minibars are stocked with a mix of healthy Dr. Weil teas and whimsical jars of penny candy, as well as Pellegrino and other goodies. The sprawling Moroccan-tiled bathrooms and eucalyptus-scented products make a shower feel like a trip to the spa (though you can get the full treatment downstairs in the Shibui spa, which surrounds a Japanese lantern–lit swimming pool and lounge). Book a room at the back of the hotel overlooking the peaceful courtyard, where you can take tea beneath latticed vines.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Harborwoods Guest House
1702 Sag Harbor Turnpike
Sag Harbor , New York
11963
Tel: 631 537 6393
info@harborwoodsguesthouse.com
harborwoodsguesthouse.com

Savvy Europeans have been in on the Harborwoods secret since this spotless and stylishly modern B&B opened in 2009. Compared with the cluttered, low-ceilinged, and more established competition, Barbro Magnusson and her husband Dean Golden's shingled retreat is a breath of fresh air. Situated along the artery that connects Bridgehampton and Sag Harbor, it's a comfortable distance from the bottleneck of Route 27, and the driveway leads straight into a system of woodsy walking trails. Floors in the capacious main house are laid with gleaming planks of fir, and furnishings in the four upstairs rooms combine Swedish antiques and tasteful Ikea pieces. The nearby but unattached studio with loft, ideal for families, sleeps four comfortably. After serving up a breakfast of omelets, lox and bagels, or pancakes with lingonberries, the owners will outfit you with a beach umbrella and a beach parking permit. Another benefit to being off the beaten track: The drive to East Hampton along less-trafficked Route 114 is a snap.—Darrell Hartman

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hedges Inn
74 James Lane
East Hampton , New York
11937
Tel: 631 324 7101
www.thehedgesinn.com

While not as elegant as Baker House 1650, the Hedges Inn still has a dynamite location and plenty of charm. Settle into a rocking chair on the front porch, which looks directly onto Town Pond, and take full advantage of both. The Hedges was refreshed with a multimillion-dollar renovation in 2008: Beadboard wainscoting, beachy pastel hues, antique reproduction furniture, and flat-screen TVs outfit the 12 rooms, which also have marble-clad bathrooms. The comfortable living room is a good place to watch movies and munch on popcorn; bring your own DVD, and the innkeeper will pop the corn. There's no restaurant, but East Hampton's eateries are a ten-minute walk away. And in lieu of a pool, guests receive passes to the East Hampton Gym, as well as everything required for a day on the shore: chairs, towels, a beach umbrella, a cooler, and a parking permit that's good for any strand between East Hampton Village and Montauk.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hôtel Americano
518 West 27th Street
Chelsea
New York City , New York
10001
Tel: 212 216 0000
info@hotel-americano.com
Hotel-Americano.com

Looking to become the go-to hot spot for young artists and scenesters in ever-trendy Chelsea, the 10-story Hôtel Americano, opened September 2011, has emerged from top to bottom as a sophisticated cultural clubhouse for the world's bespectacled art elites. Beneath the hotel, Bar Americano is perhaps the sexiest bunker in the city, with curved concrete walls, white-leather Scandinavian furniture, and a sunken Brazilian bar (the living room–esque El Privado is tucked away in the back for VIPs). On the ground floor, guests can sip on strong coffee and sup on inventive Latin–French dishes in The Americano restaurant, with a back patio for dining alfresco. Up and up, via a dedicated elevator, the all-weather rooftop lounge La Piscine has Mediterranean flair (and fare) in the summer and alpine frills (and a wood-fire grill) in the winter, along with a heated pool open year-round. As for the accommodations, the 56 midcentury minimalist rooms are comfortable, if a bit small, reminiscent of an urban ryokan with platform beds, gallery-white walls, and a mix of textures—wood, felt, chambray, mirrored metal, marble, brushed concrete. The standard Downtown King and Queen rooms are not much more than crash pads with '60s-inspired vinyl beanbag settees, iPads loaded with tunes and concierge apps, but no desks. On a relatively grander scale, the Uptown Studios have a separate sitting room with low-to-the-ground furniture and hanging teardrop fireplaces, and somewhat awkward soaking tubs in the small bathrooms. Denim robes from Loden Dager, Aesop toiletries, 24-hour room service delivered in bento boxes, and mezcal tequila and harmonicas in the minibar add just the right amount of quirkiness. In lesser hands, all this mishmash might appear muddled, but interior designer Arnaud Montigny (of Colette fame) nails the je ne sais quoi of cool.—Justin Ocean

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Hotel on Rivington
107 Rivington Street
Lower East Side
New York City , New York
10002
Tel: 212 475 2600
info@hotelonrivington.com
www.hotelonrivington.com

This tall glass box looms symbolically and literally over the changing neighborhood of the Lower East Side, where the rundown streets of tenements that once housed Eastern European immigrants are now home to scores of cutting-edge boutiques, bars and cafés—not to mention a Starbucks. The design here is in sync with the area's other new tenants: monochromatic and modern, with floor-to-ceiling transparent walls that allow the city streets to become part of the design. If you're not careful, they also allow you to become part of the view for your neighbors, particularly in rooms on the lower floors. For shy types, there are wraparound curtains and opaque plastic panels that can be affixed to the window. All 110 rooms have Swedish Tempur-Pedic mattresses and deep Japanese soaking tubs. In the Owner's Suite, the tub is placed directly against the glass bathroom wall for a corner panoramic view. The triplex penthouse is the suite of choice for visiting Gen X and Gen Y celebrities, although the true party room might be 184—it has a shower large enough for 10. No questions asked.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hôtel Plaza Athénée
37 E. 64th Street
Upper East Side
New York City , New York
10065
Tel: 800 447 8800 (toll-free)
Tel: 212 734 9100
www.plaza-athenee.com

The quintessential Upper East Side residential nest, this collection of 149 rooms and suites is decorated with Asian and European silks, framed prints, and striped drapes. The two penthouses have indoor atriums and terraces and a past guest list that includes Elizabeth Taylor and Princess Diana, both drawn to the hotel's privacy. In contrast to the rooms' perfectly pedigreed style, the watering hole off the lobby, Bar Seine, is pretty wild, a combination of Moroccan and African decor, with animal-print couches, leather floors, velvet drapes, and onyx sconces—a place for Upper East Siders, even temporary ones, to let down their (perfectly coiffed) hair. Yes, that is Robert DeNiro lounging in the corner.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Huntting Inn
94 Main Street
East Hampton , New York
11937
Tel: 631 324 0410
Fax: 631 324 6122
www.thepalm.com/Huntting-Inn

Despite slightly rickety staircases and a bit of peeling paint here and there, the picturesque 300-year-old Huntting Inn, encircled by a picket fence and shaded by a majestic elm, is one of the best hotels in the Hamptons. The country-style interiors are a nice break from the area's seaside theme, and thanks to renovations, they look sprucer than in years past. The mansion also houses a tony branch of The Palm steak-house chain, an East End institution since 1980. Everyone from beach-house owners to celebs—including Renée Zellweger, Michael Kors, and Calvin Klein—to starstruck tourists pack in here, clamoring for seats on the porch and enjoying large portions of dry-aged steak, jumbo lobsters, and Italian-leaning classics such as linguine with red or white clam sauce.—Updated by Darrell Hartman

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Inn at Irving Place
56 Irving Place
Gramercy
New York City , New York
10003
Tel: 800 685 1447 (toll-free)
Tel: 212 533 4600
innatirving@aol.com
www.innatirving.com

More country than town, the two 1834 brownstones near Gramercy Park at East 17th Street that house this 12-room inn are all 19th-century charm. Each room, along with Lady Mendl's Tea Salon downstairs, is assembled so perfectly with period antiques that you expect Edith Wharton or Henry James to be your fellow guests—instead, you'll often see publishers from Europe. Wrought-iron bedframes, Oriental carpets, curved divans with silk pillows, carved wood paneling, and nonworking fireplaces are the suitably genteel items of design. Junior suites have a separate sitting area—continental breakfast can be taken there or downstairs in Lady Mendl's, where there's also a Wharton-worthy afternoon tea.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The James
27 Grand Street
Soho
New York City , New York
10013
Tel: 888 526 3778 (toll-free)
Tel: 212 465 2000
Fax: 312 337 7217
www.jameshotels.com/New-York-Hotel.aspx?name=The-James-New-York

An artsy crowd favors the Manhattan sister of Chicago's James (Hot List 2007). The hotel fills an 18-story raw-concrete tower that dwarfs the low-slung buildings of SoHo, allowing sweeping views. A small street-level entrance leads to a second-floor "sky lobby," providing a calm respite from the bustling pedestrian traffic and Holland Tunnel activity below. Service is familiar, not formal. The 114 rooms are innovatively designed as a flex space: Furnished with a small couch, chair, and table, they are equally suited for desk work, in-room dining, or poring over a neighborhood map to plan your day or evening. The in-room amenities are forward-thinking—filtered (not bottled) water, waste-reducing hole-in-the-middle soap bars, and reclaimed-wood floors, among other things. The James is vertically bookended by David Burke Kitchen, the basement restaurant, and Jimmy, a rooftop cocktail bar from the team behind the West Village's chic Hotel Griffou. Also on the roof—a small pool with a grand panorama.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
The Jane Hotel
113 Jane Street
West Village
New York City , New York
10014
Tel: 212 924 6700
reservations@thejanenyc.com
TheJaneNYC.com

Superlative set design meets the golden age of travel at the Jane Hotel, a 159-room former SRO for sailors (with a few residents still remaining; look for the silver doors) and one-time refuge of Titanic victims in the far West Village. It's the budget alternative to equally mise-en-scène sister properties the Maritime and Bowery hotels, and best for those looking for a stylish base, not space. At 50 square feet, Standard Cabins feel like a faded Orient-Express train car (dark woods, deep red coverlets, vintage fans, water decanters on marble shelves) pimped out with modern comforts (AC, flat-screen TVs, iPod docks, robes). Tiny windows overlook the street or a light well, luggage space is minimal, and anyone over 6 feet 2 inches tall might struggle with the beds. But rooms starting at $99 per night and perks like free Wi-Fi, bikes to borrow, High Line adjacency, and an on-property Cafe Gitane tip the value scale. For party hounds, cruising past the queue to enter the mansionlike Jane Ballroom is reason enough to book a room. One catch: shared bathrooms. These separate cubicles with rain showers are constantly cleaned, mind you, but they sit pretty, in retro chrome and white subway tiles, at the end of the hall. If the souped-up hostel vibe isn't for you, the 30 Captain's Cabins (from $325) have en-suite baths, full to king beds, Hudson River views, and space enough to groove.—Justin Ocean

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Jumeirah Essex House
160 Central Park South
Midtown West
New York City , New York
10019
Tel: 877 854 8051
Tel: 212 247 0300
JEHinfo@jumeirah.com
www.jumeirah.com/en/Hotels-and-Resorts/Destinations/New-York/Jumeirah-Essex-House

Dubai-based hotel group Jumeirah spent $90 million renovating the Essex House hotel on Central Park South after acquiring this Art Deco dowager in 2006. But unlike its opulent Middle Eastern sibling, the Burj Al Arab, the Essex House doesn't aim for seven stars; in terms of price and luxury, it sits a notch below the nearby Mandarin Oriental, Ritz-Carlton, and Four Seasons. That means you can get a handsomely decorated, nice-size hotel room with a direct view of Central Park for $400 or so, well below what competitors charge (check the Jumeirah Essex House Web site for frequent special deals). The renovation preserved and updated the lobby's 1930s elegance, with coffered ceilings, fluted travertine columns, and a striking pair of large Central Park photographs by artist Atta Kim (courtesy of the hotel's artist-in-residence program). Rooms are contemporary, if blandly so (lots of beige), with built-in wood desks, leather chairs, marble bathrooms, and very comfortable beds. High-tech equipment includes flat-screen TVs, Bose iPod docks, and a touch pad–controlled lighting system that's too complicated for its own good (one feature we did like: "stumble lights" that illuminate the floor when you get out of bed). Service is amiable and professional—our room service breakfast arrived well within the promised 25 minutes. The downsides: The modern American fare at the South Gate restaurant is mediocre (though it's worth stopping by for a park-view drink at the bar). Maintenance could be better (a smudge on the sofa, a sticky door, an ugly electrical box hanging from the ceiling). And the 300-square-foot interior-facing rooms can feel confined. Instead, splash out on a 750-square-foot Central Park Suite—we've seen them on third-party Web sites for as low as $850 a night, one of the best deals in town.—Peter J. Frank

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Lafayette House
38 E. 4th Street
East Village
New York City , New York
10003
Tel: 212 505 8100
lafayettenyc.com

New York luxury hotels often fail to deliver the greatest of New York luxuries: downtime. Lobbies can feel so sceney you need a stylist, and restaurants so exclusive even guests can't score tables. Enter the Lafayette House. The East Village hotel has no lobby, no bar, no restaurant. Check-in consists of being buzzed in and taken directly to your room (likely the most interaction you'll have with staff during your stay). The 15 individually decorated rooms have a prewar old-money vibe (lushly upholstered antiques, cut crystal chandeliers, working marble fireplaces) with subtle details from the building's bordello past: a naughty photograph here, a racy art book there. Because there are no common spaces, rooms are relatively self-contained units with coffee makers, flat screen TV/DVDs, Wi-Fi, iPod docks, and carefully selected reading material (think vintage National Geographics, fashion books, and design magazines). Of course, the high-end standard bearers—500 thread-count sheets, designer toiletries by C.O. Bigelow—are all in evidence. The pied-a-terre vibe appeals to those you'd expect to those you'd expect to find at more raucous hotels, from the cast of HBO's quirky Flight of the Conchords to members of the Strokes. Warning: If you're looking to be waited on, look elsewhere (perhaps the hotel's sister property around the corner, the Bowery): The place is only (lightly) staffed during daytime hours. After 11, you pick up your room keys at the bar next door.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Library Hotel
299 Madison Avenue
Midtown East
New York City , New York
10017
Tel: 877 793 7323 (toll-free)
Tel: 212 983 4500
reservations@libraryhotel.com
www.libraryhotel.com

The concept sounds gimmicky—the 60 rooms are first categorized according to the Dewey Decimal system by subject (Literature, Arts, Math and Science, and History), then further individualized by subcategory (Astronomy, Asian History, Music, etc.). But it works. The handsome, home-like guestrooms, done up in dark woods with contrasting, cream-colored bedding, offer a diverting selection of books pertaining to their subject; not surprisingly, the "Erotic Literature" room is the most popular, but as the staff amusedly point out, "Fairy Tales" runs a close second. "Love," meanwhile, has a terrace. Apart from the good-looking rooms and appealing public spaces, including a rooftop bar and second-floor book-filled lounge, this hotel, located near Grand Central Terminal, wins points on generosity: Continental breakfast and nightly wine and cheese are free, as are WiFi, snacks during the day, and videos. In this town, that's a steal.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
London NYC
151 W. 54th Street
Midtown West , New York
10019
Tel: 212 307 5000
Fax: 212 765 6530
www.thelondonnyc.com

When the 562-room London NYC opened in late 2006, the news that the restaurant was to be headed by Hell's Kitchen antihero Gordon Ramsay upstaged the news about the hotel itself. While Ramsay's considerable talent has (so far) failed to inspire Manhattan's jaded foodies, it's no matter—the real highlight is upstairs, anyway. Instead of cramped city-standard spaces, all of the David Collins–designed rooms are suites. The smallest is 300 square feet, and in most, the parlor leads through French doors to a bedroom with a well-fluffed bed, and then on to a marble- and mosaic-tiled Waterworks bath, complete with rain shower and soaking tub. Book a Vista suite to see above the surrounding office towers and onto Central Park. While the echoing chambers are big, they feel a bit impersonal—better for biz execs, perhaps, than starry-eyed lovers—and the parlor's groovy banquette is more pleasant to look at than to sit on (settle into the rocking chair instead). Room service, which includes dishes such as lobster risotto with mascarpone, is courtesy of Mr. Ramsay (or his staff, at least), but it's more fun to head downstairs to Maze, the powder-blue, 1960s-style lounge. All in all, there is a vaguely British feel about the place—from the dapper chaps manning the door to afternoon high tea—but thankfully they all have much better manners than Mr. Ramsay.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Lowell
28 East 63rd Street
Upper East Side
New York City , New York
10065
Tel: 800 221 4444 (toll-free)
Tel: 212-319-4230
reservations@lowellhotel.com
www.lowellhotel.com

Clubby and intimate—only 23 rooms and 47 suites—with the tiniest of lobbies, this is the hotel of choice for VIPs who want to drop out of sight. Built as an apartment building in the 1920s, the hotel maintains its residential feel with suites laid out and individually decorated as apartments would be—including several with wood-burning fireplaces and terraces. Four specialty suites have individual themes: In warm weather, go for the Garden Suite, which has two terraces, one with a flower garden and a fountain; in colder months, the blue and gold Manhattan Suite, with two sitting rooms, is both cozy and grand.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Mandarin Oriental, New York
80 Columbus Circle
Midtown West
New York City , New York
10023
Tel: 866 801 8880 (toll-free)
Tel: 212 805 8800
monyc-reservations@mohg.com
www.mandarinoriental.com/newyork

On the 35th through 54th floors of the Time Warner complex on Columbus Circle, the Mandarin Oriental New York competes with the Four Seasons across town as the best-situated, most modern luxury hotel in the city. But whereas the Four Seasons is cool austerity, the Mandarin is all Asian opulence, starting with the Dale Chihuly crystal sculpture (dramatic but oddly reminiscent of a flock of decapitated flamingos) rising from a moss garden in the middle of the marble and granite entry. Elsewhere, there are framed kimonos on the walls, silver inserts in the floor, and upstairs in the 248 rooms and suites, raw silk bedspreads and pillows in Chinese red and saffron. Elegance and comfort aside, the accommodations can seem small for the price, especially if you're on the building's west side (consolation prize: spectacular sunset views over the Hudson from the soaking tub). The "Central Park view" rooms are sometimes blocked by buildings in front—notably the Trump International Hotel—but that barely diminishes the captain-of-the-universe aura. Go for the corners, particularly the 00 and 16 series suites, for more space and the best vistas. The other prize view is from the shimmering restaurant, Asiate, which serves superb Japanese-inflected food (order the soba noodles with caviar, wasabi crème fraîche, and a poached egg). The hotel's Time Warner Center location leaves you spoiled for other restaurant choices (Per Se, one of the city's top tables, is just an elevator ride away), not to mention shopping and Lincoln Center's jazz outpost under the same roof. But be sure to save time for the Mandarin's other offerings: tea in the lobby lounge, which has a sensational park view; laps in the 75-foot pool, with glass walls overlooking the Hudson; and the 14,500-square-foot spa, an oasis of Asian serenity that makes you forget you're in a city at all.—Laurie Werner; updated by Peter J. Frank

P.S. The Mandarin makes a cameo appearance in our exclusive video, 24 Hours in…New York City.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Mark
25 East 77th Street
New York City , New York
Tel: 212 744 4300
Tel: 866 744 4300
reservations@themarkhotel.com
www.themarkhotel.com

An haute hideaway on Manhattan's Upper East Side since 1927, the venerable Mark reopened last fall with a radical new look, trading in its erstwhile French pedigree for Parisian pop. For starters, there's the traffic-stopping zebra-striped marble floor in the lobby and in the guest bathrooms—a wink, perhaps, at the hotel's Art Deco past. The designer, celebrity decorator Jacques Grange, turned the lobby into a gallery of sorts for Europe's top furniture designers, featuring Paul Matheiu's orange-velvet sofa and chairs, Mattia Bonetti's bulbous mirrors, and Ron Arad's dangling-sphere chandelier. Guest quarters are far more sedate, thankfully, with grass-cloth walls, pale-oak desks, and ivory-colored linens (Italian, naturally). A word of warning: Some of the 150 guest rooms are on the small side, though all the bathrooms are huge and hedonistic, with tubs built for two and small TVs tucked discreetly into the mirrors. Downstairs, Jean-Georges Vongerichten presides over the congenial new restaurant, serving everything from oysters to black-truffle pizza. For all the changes at The Mark, the service remains terrifically old-school: When our reviewer spilled a glass of red wine on the white carpet, housekeeping arrived at the room in minutes—and offered to fetch more wine.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Mercer
147 Mercer Street
Soho
New York City , New York
10012
Tel: 212 966 6060
reservations@mercerhotel.com
www.mercerhotel.com

This Romanesque Revival building, built in 1890 for tycoon John Jacob Astor and later colonized by artists, instantly became Hollywood Central when André Balazs converted it into a hotel in 1998. In the early days of the Balazs era, Leonardo DiCaprio seemed to do all of his interviews in the casual library/living room setup in the lobby. Later, the hotel was the setting for a well-publicized Russell Crowe tantrum in which the actor threw a telephone at a reception desk attendant (to be fair to Rusty, service can be a little spotty). You never know who you're going to see at the Mercer or what you'll see them do. The 75 highly designed yet unpretentious rooms and suites have high ceilings, large windows, and huge, sexy bathrooms; designer Christian Liagre filled them with sharp but comfortable touches like dark wenge wood furniture and banquettes in lilac leather. Some rooms have a working fireplace, and the loft suite on the top floor has enormous arched windows.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Mill House Inn
31 N. Main Street
East Hampton , New York
11937
Tel: 631 324 9766
innkeeper@millhouseinn.com
www.millhouseinn.com

Occupying an 18th-century house but kitted out with iPod docks and Blu-ray players, the Mill House Inn's ten individually decorated rooms strike an easy balance of old and new. Two suites in an annex have fireplaces and bathrooms big enough to ride a bike in: The nautical red-white-and-blue America's Cup Suite has a gas fireplace and a private deck, while the Captain's Quarters are furnished with a leather sofa and Asian antiques, including a 200-year-old mah-jongg table inlaid with ivory. Rooms in the main inn are equally plush; the Patrick Lynch Room, named for a previous owner of the house, has reclaimed-wood tables crafted in nearby Sag Harbor and a fantastic view of the Old Hook Windmill. (Five of the rooms are dog-friendly.) The breakfast menu takes slightly longer to read than the local newspaper—try the crayfish and andouille étouffée omelet, and heed the menu's warning about portion size. Though it's just a minute's walk from the center of East Hampton, the place has a calming quiet about it. Innkeepers Gary and Sylvia Muller, transplants who opted out of big-city life, are waiting with a warm welcome (and often a fresh batch of cookies).—Updated by Darrell Hartman

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Mohonk Mountain House
1000 Mountain Rest Road
New Paltz , New York
12561
Tel: 800 772 6646 (toll-free)
www.mohonk.com

Ninety miles north of New York City, this wood and Shawangunk-stone castle resort and National Historic Landmark in the Hudson Valley is "a huge building, but perfectly proportioned and integrated into the mountain landscape. It's a dream from the Victorian era of America's history." Rooms are uniquely decorated, some have balconies and fireplaces. Service is "always top notch!" The spa's outdoor mineral pool is heated; the property also offers 85 miles of hiking trails, a stable, and groomed cross-country skiing terrain.

(267 rooms)

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Mondrian Soho
9 Crosby Street
Soho
New York City , New York
10013
Tel: 212 389 1000
Fax: 212 389 1001
www.MondrianSoho.com

Not to discount the power of true love, but if Jean Cocteau's 1946 La belle et la bête is indeed Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz's design inspiration for the lush Mondrian Soho, we're liable to believe that Belle stayed for the castle as much as for the Beast. What the 270 "sleeping chambers" lack in size (even two-bedroom suites top out at 320 square feet), they make up for in fantastical romance: a platform bed flanked by chrome lanterns, crystal goblets arranged on a mirrored silver tray, gray-wisped white marble bathrooms. Everything is swathed in periwinkle toile on dreamy white set off by rich blue carpeting that would make Yves Klein jealous. Book a high corner room to optimize the floor-to-ceiling windows with uptown or downtown vistas—from the shower. Malin + Goetz products, Geneva stereo cubes, and an iPad as magic mirror (a temperamental portal to hotel services) round out the little luxuries, while Pabst in the minibar keeps things real. This balance, as much as the hotel's east Soho location, draws a deep-pocketed style-monger crowd that can appreciate the drama of entering through a tunnel of ivy into a blue-tinted mirrored wonderland. Businessmen with expense accounts also apply at Imperial No. Nine, Top Chef Sam Talbot's buzzy seafood joint housed in a conservatory off the lobby. The staff is friendly and model-attractive, if aloof. Lest no one greet you at the door, check-in is up a flight of marble stairs, daily Equinox gym passes (there's also a well-equipped gym in the basement) at the ready.—Justin Ocean

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
New York Marriott at the Brooklyn Bridge
333 Adams Street
Brooklyn , New York
11201
Tel: 718 246 7000
Tel: 888 436 3759
Fax: 718 246 0563
Subway: 2, 3, 4, or 5 train to Borough Hall
www.brooklynmarriott.com

This single solitary full-service hotel in Brooklyn has some things going for it. It's situated just south of the Brooklyn Bridge, so you can walk the 30 minutes across to Manhattan—or take one of the four subway lines on the doorstep—and if you choose wisely among the 659 rooms and suites, you get that skyline view (insist on one above the sixth floor facing Manhattan when you book). A huge plus is the health club with indoor swimming pool, but for this you have to suffer beyond-corporate decor, hideous printed bedspreads, and all. The location—by Borough Hall, Fulton Mall, and downtown Brooklyn—is terrible, and the million restaurants are at least five minutes' unscenic walk away. The Marriott's own Archives restaurant serves anodyne American cuisine. If you're here to visit Brooklyn family and they lack a guest room, this is definitely worth considering.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Nolitan
30 Kenmare Street
Nolita
New York City , New York
10012
Tel: 212 925 2555
reservations@nolitanhotel.com
nolitanhotel.com

In a neighborhood known for its boutiques (yet traditionally lacking any of the sleeping kind), shoppers finally have a place to rest their stylish heads. The 55-room hotel incorporates, or rather appropriates, the cachet of cool running through the neighborhood of Nolita. There are rose-scented bath amenities by local apothecary Red Flower, purchasable in-room artwork from the Jen Bekman Gallery, day passes to Equinox SoHo, and a sunken library curated by Phaidon, plus bikes on loan and a rather comprehensive house-produced guide to get you exploring the area. A neutral palate, custom mi-mo furnishings, and scruffy oak floors pop against black Venetian plaster walls and vampy red accents in the rooms. Outdoor space makes the efficient Balcony rooms feel more spacious, while the Corner rooms have floor-to-ceiling windows and a dramatic soaking tub just off the living room. Ample freebies (phone calls, 2 pm checkout, Wi-Fi, unpacking service, and organic treats for Poochie) keep the vibe unpretentiously hip and welcoming, making you feel like you're renting the kind of spunky modern-minded loft that locals wish they lived in. Best of all, each guest receives a "passport" with discounts and perks to neighborhood shops like John Varvatos and Duncan Quinn.—Justin Ocean

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Nu Hotel
85 Smith Street
Boerum Hill
Brooklyn , New York
11201
Tel: 718 852 8585
Fax: 718 852 8558
Subway: F train to Bergen Street; A, C to Hoyt-Schermerhorn Streets
www.nuhotelbrooklyn.com

The biggest plus and minus for Brooklyn's first true boutique hotel, opened in 2008, is its location: at the top of restaurant row on Smith Street, across from a high-rise city jail. But if you can forgive the unsightly barbed-wire views from the hotel's street-facing rooms, this sister property of the Duane Hotel in Tribeca is an arty option that packs a ton of style into its 96 rooms. Interiors are whitewashed with that stark minimalism that sometimes comes off as rather bland, although the design is accented (and elevated) here by attention to Brooklyn's often ironic appreciation for its industrial roots. From the rusty red "YES" depot sign in the lobby to local photography in the rooms, Basquiat prints, and quotes from famous Brooklynites like Henry Miller in the hallways, the Nu Hotel maintains a sense of understated cool. There are custom-made beds in the rooms, 32-inch flat-screen TVs, iPod docking stations, and even hammocks in a few of the suites (average room size is 175 square feet). The curved lobby transforms into a small bar at night, where locals and guests mingle over cocktails and light snacks. Although the hotel lacks a restaurant, there's arguably no need for one, with Smith Street's many dining spots only a short stroll away.—Douglas Wright

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
On the Ave
2178 Broadway
Upper West Side
New York City , New York
10024
Tel: 212 362 1100
info@ontheave-nyc.com
www.ontheave-nyc.com

This Upper West Side hotel has features usually associated with more expensive accommodations: good design, plasma-screen TVs, 24-hour room service, CD players with a selection of complimentary discs, plush sheets and towels. It isn't perfect—housekeeping could be a little more diligent when it comes to cleaning the carpet in the hallways, and the lobby furniture could look fresher. But for the price, the rooms, services, and residential neighborhood (three blocks from Central Park and two from the Museum of Natural History) are very good. Try for the 14th floor and the rooms with terraces, particularly 1405, a corner room with the largest outdoor space.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Peninsula New York
700 Fifth Avenue
Midtown East
New York City , New York
10019
Tel: 800 262 9467 (toll-free)
Tel: 212 956 2888
pny@peninsula.com
newyork.peninsula.com

A Beaux Arts masterpiece built in 1905—featuring an overlay of Asian style courtesy of its Hong Kong–based parent—the Pen doesn't generally draw as much attention as the others in the luxe group. But it offers a smooth combination of Art Nouveau interiors and top-of-the-line business services, some copied from its Hong Kong flagship. The noise-canceling feature on the hands-free phone, for example, allows conversations in the bathtub; your caller won't hear the water running. Decor is plush and European, with just a few Eastern touches like colored silks. There's also a glass-enclosed pool and an equally popular rooftop bar.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Plaza
Fifth Avenue at Central Park South
New York City , New York
10019
Tel: 212 759 3000
theplaza@fairmont.com
www.fairmont.com/theplaza

The Plaza emerges from its $400 million renovation with architectural grandeur, decor long on marble and crystal, plenty of references to Eloise, and of course its sweetheart location at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 59th Street. But the hotel has done more than cling to a century-deep history. Keeping pace with modern times, it now has private condos (starting at $2.5 million), as well as 282 guest rooms (down from its original 805), which include 152 Pied-à-Terre units that will be rented by the night when not occupied by owners. Everything comes dear here, from a bowl of oatmeal or an in-room movie for $15 to the Edwardian Park Suite at $2,500 a night. Among the shameless luxuries are butlers on each floor (still learning their trade as of March, but supremely courteous), Louis XV-style furniture, chandeliers, 24-karat gold-plated fixtures in the vast bathrooms, carpeting as soft as puppy fur, and electronic panels that do everything but beam you to the Champagne Bar in the lobby. If you only drop in to gawk, pass through the strangely empty Fifth Avenue foyer to admire the splendid Palm Court and the laylight ceiling, which rises above a forest of high-back steel-blue chairs where sophisticates sip afternoon tea starting at 2 P.M. ($60 per person).

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
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Reform Club
23 Windmill Lane
Amagansett , New York
11930
Tel: 631 267 8500
info@reformclubinn.com
reformclubinn.com/main.html

The Hamptons have never been a hotel hotbed, but a few choice properties are emerging amid the 12-foot privet hedges and manicured lawns. The Reform Club, built on the site of a run-down shingle-covered bed and breakfast, opened in 2009 in the discreet East Hampton hamlet of Amagansett, where the neighbors include Gwyneth Paltrow, Paul McCartney, and Jerry Seinfeld. The look in the seven suites and three cottages is breezy and low-key: white wood paneling, taupe sofas, linen-covered headboards, embroidered bedspreads. Each suite and cottage has different contemporary art—a headless, one-armed woman makes frequent appearances in prints and paintings—a coffee table piled high with art and history tomes, iPod dock, and, best of all, a working fireplace. Voluminous bathrooms with mosaic floors (ours had his and hers walk-in showers) and Bulgari products are another highlight. Unless you're at the beach or browsing East Hampton's pricey boutiques (be driven to either in the hotel's SUV, or borrow a bike), you'll be tempted to stay in your own quarters, which include a terrace in most cases. The communal room, where breakfast is served if you choose not to have it chez vous, is functional but uninspiring.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Ritz-Carlton New York, Battery Park
2 West Street
Financial District
New York City , New York
10280
Tel: 212 344 0800
Fax: 212 344 3801
www.ritzcarlton.com/hotels/new_york_battery_park/

The first hotel to open near the World Trade Center after the September 11 attack, this Ritz was guaranteed the affection of New Yorkers. But it has more than sentiment to recommend it: The rooms facing the harbor have postcard views of the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, plus telescopes to take full advantage—get a corner Liberty Suite for the best views. The lighter wood, fabrics in shades of sage and beige, and contemporary art by about 100 New York artists, including April Gornik and Ross Bleckner, make it fresher than the typical Ritz. The only drawback: If you're not arriving and departing by taxi, car, or the hotel's shuttle service, you have to cross several lanes of traffic and walk a sizable distance to the Wall Street area for the nearest subway. The hotel's uptown sibling is more convenient: a conventionally plush midtown Ritz with stellar views of Central Park and a La Prairie spa.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Ritz-Carlton New York, Central Park
50 Central Park South
Midtown West
New York City , New York
10021
Tel: 212 308 9100
Fax: 212 207 8831
www.ritzcarlton.com/hotels/new_york_central_park/

The lobby, with onyx floors, limestone walls, and brass sconces, "opens before you like a scene from a great old movie." "Waking up with a view of Central Park is the reason to choose this hotel." Beds have Frette linens and a choice of seven pillows; "the bathroom was lavish with marble, chrome, and glass but remarkably inviting." Staff are tuned in: "When we returned one night after seeing the Broadway show Jersey Boys, the sound track was playing on our room's CD player." BLT Market's menu is green market driven, and might include morel and English pea risotto.

(259 rooms)

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Room Mate Grace
125 W. 45th Street
Midtown West
New York City , New York
10036
Tel: 212 354 2323
grace@room-matehotels.com
www.Room-MateHotels.com/eng/nuevayorkhotel/gracehotel/gracehotel.php

The quirky Spanish chain Room Mate Hotels has made a name for itself abroad with high-spec yet affordable design-conscious rooms, making its 2008 takeover of André Balazs's Hotel QT and its fun approach to frugality a muy fácil translation. Renovated and redubbed the Grace, the 139-room property attracts fashion-forward twentysomethings who can make do without room service, a concierge, and reliable (if free) Wi-Fi. Hallways sport trippy '70s geometric wallpaper, while rooms (doubles and three- or four-bunk layouts) carry the sass inside with additional patterns in various colors (golds, bordello reds, blues and greens, black and white), peekaboo rain showers, and faux-ostrich platform beds with storage underneath and Egyptian cotton bedding. The coup de Grace: a heated pool-cum-club and 24/7 sauna and steam room just off the lobby. With stepped seating, a swim-up bar, and PYTs splashing and sweating to DJs five nights a week, it's a dimly lit, clubby affair that could easily become the bane of business travelers. Each morning, the area transforms into a kitchen serving a pastries, meats, cheeses, eggs, and fruit, plus strong coffee and juice ($10). Gratis Granny Smiths at reception? Available anytime.—Justin Ocean

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
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The Setai Fifth Avenue
400 Fifth Avenue
Midtown West
New York City , New York
10018
Tel: 212 695 4005
info@setaififthavenue.com
setaififthavenue.com

Given the relative architectural anonymity of this 60-story skyscraper just north of the Empire State Building, restraint would seem to be the watchword at the Setai. But past the phalanx of doormen, the stiff formality softens. Spacious rooms are filled with natural light, supple surfaces, and natural materials like walnut desks and leather headboards. All the rooms and suites have walnut wardrobes, bedside tables, and trim; wondrously comfortable Duxiana beds; and deep soaking tubs. Another 57 apartment suites have full stainless-steel kitchens. But space is the real luxury, as always, in Manhattan. Rooms start at a generous-for–New York 400 square feet. Such acreage, and the personal assistant assigned to each guest, don't come cheap, so brace yourself. The outstanding Italian restaurant Ai Fiori, is one of Michael White's (Marea, Osteria Morini). The sprawling Auriga spa has 11 treatment rooms. But perhaps the sweetest service of all is that there's no checkout hour—the ultimate luxury for any true traveler.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Smyth
85 West Broadway
Tribeca
New York City , New York
10007
Tel: 212 587 7000
www.thompsonhotels.com/hotels/nyc/smyth-tribeca

Tribeca and Thompson hotels both seem to have more stars per square foot than a Diddy White Party (I'll see you a De Niro, and raise you a Jay-Z). Stars perch on the exclusive rooftop decks of Thompson's properties in Soho and on the Lower East Side or throw raucous parties in the penthouse suites. But when the hotel group decided to move into Tribeca, it dialed things back a notch. Playing on the anonymity of "Mr. and Mrs. Smith," Smyth is meant to be more of a refuge than a playground. The concept plays well in the lobby, which feels like a modern reimagining of a London gentleman's club (think tufted leather alcoves, walls covered in pinstripe suiting fabric, and whimsical touches like a collection of vintage tin robots in the reception area). There's a bit of a disconnect between that vibe and the rooms, whose stark white-on-white bedding and walls can feel a bit cold in comparison. Still, the chrome accents, walnut paneling, and Brazilian modernist furniture feel rich and indulgent, as do the Kiehl's body products and 400-thread-count Sferra linens. The bathrooms add a sexy touch with slightly frosted glass showers, exposing the contours of the occupant to anyone in the bedroom. There are subtle nods to stardom—John Sparagana art based on magazine spreads, lighting fixtures that evoke spotlights—but the mood is decidedly understated. If you're over the hotel-as-nightclub experience and want a look at how stars actually live in the city, Smyth is a good place to find out. The only catch? There's currently no restaurant. But call your buddy Bobby and I'm sure he'll slot you in at Locanda Verde. —Colleen Clark

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Soho Grand
310 West Broadway
Soho
New York City , New York
10013
Tel: 800 965 3000 (toll-free)
Tel: 212 965 3000
www.sohogrand.com

With its 2,000-square-foot penthouse lofts, the Soho Grand, the first luxury hotel in SoHo, is still the most dramatic. Very much in the downtown spirit, these suites look like an art dealer's loft—cool and residential with one-of-a-kind pieces such as zinc screens and vintage chandeliers. The designer, Bill Sofield, quotes rock icon Lou Reed as one of his influences in choosing furnishings, undoubtedly a first. Pick the larger north-facing penthouse for the postcard skyline views. The other 367 rooms have been undergoing renovation—make sure you get one of the new ones—adding flat-screen TVs, expanded closets, and contrasting fabrics in browns and blues. Because the hotel's proprietors also own the pet company Hartz Mountain, cats and dogs have a good deal here, too—a selection of meals on the room service menu, walkers, sitters, and an array of toys at their disposal.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
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Soho House
29-35 Ninth Avenue
West Village
New York City , New York
Tel: 212 627 9800
Fax: 212 627 4766
www.sohohouse.com

The Soho House is the Meatpacking District's answer to a country club: Membership is exclusive, and only a privileged few ever enter its unmarked doors. The ticket in for locals and visitors alike is to book one of 24 "playpens" (or "playgrounds," as the palatial 950 square-foot suites are called). The large, loftlike rooms are made for mischief with oversized beds, naughty minibars, booming surround-sound, and freestanding tubs-for-two (or three). The decor is eclectic but tasteful: vintage mohair sofas, antique chandeliers, Moroccan poufs, Tibetan rugs. Because many club members use the rooms as crash pads, every imaginable amenity is provided, ranging from luxe lotions and potions from the onsite Cowshed Spa to hair straighteners, media centers, and barware for entertaining. It's easy to mix with the locals in the playful 6th floor restaurant and lounge where fashion designers, bankers, and celebs occupy tufted leather couches and mod egg chairs or crowd the billiards and foosball tables. But the centerpiece is the storied rooftop pool—setting of a famous "Sex and the City" scene—where you can swim with Hugh Jackman or sip cocktails next to Cameron Diaz while overlooking the Hudson River and West Village.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
St. Regis New York
2 E. 55th Street
Midtown East
New York City , New York
10022
Tel: 800 759 7550 (toll-free)
Tel: 212 753 4500
stregisny.res@stregis.com
www.starwoodhotels.com/stregis/search/hotel_detail.html?propertyID=81

If Louis XVI were alive today and in the market for a New York pied-à-terre, this landmark on 55th at Fifth Avenue is the hotel he'd pick. The gilded, marble-clad lobby and 256 rooms and suites are unabashedly ornate, even after the 2006 renovations. The rooms have been simplified and brought up to date with color schemes of steel blue and green or daffodil and more modern plush furniture, but the crystal chandeliers, elaborate draped canopies, and carved plaster moldings remain—as does the studiedly Old World elegance. The regal Astor Court is still ideal for afternoon tea, and the adjacent King Cole Bar with its famous Maxfield Parrish mural is the place to order a Bloody Mary; it was invented here. For more decadence, book a table at Alain Ducasse's Adour or time in the lavish spa. Have a special request? E-mail your personal butler.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Standard New York
848 Washington Street
Chelsea
New York City , New York
10014
Tel: 877 550 4646 (toll-free)
Tel: 212 645 4646
nyccontact@standardhotel.com
standardhotels.com/new-york-city

Despite its location and never-ending buzz, this is one of the city's relatively reasonable hotels, made clear by the unmemorable yet inoffensive Design Within Reach–style decor. Yet no one can quibble with the jaw-dropping city or river views from the floor-to-ceiling windows in the 337 rooms. Remember that this is a Standard, and those over 35 may feel put off by the hotel's absurdly rich, beautiful, and young clientele. And like André Balazs's other Standards, in Hollywood and downtown L.A., this hotel is not standard issue: The Jetsons-meets-Brutalist glass-and-concrete tower, opened in 2009, ingeniously straddles the High Line promenade. When you are looking for refuge from the Meatpacking District's bridge-and-tunnel scene that swirls below, the hotel's new American grill and the seasonal outdoor Biergarten are good respites. The real place to be seen, however, is on the 18th floor, where you'll pay $25 for a dram at Top of the Standard (previously known as the Boom Boom Room), a bar with unparalleled Hudson River views that is styled like a curvaceous luxury yacht.—Jeff Harris

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Sunset Beach
35 Shore Road
Shelter Island , New York
11965
Tel: 631 749 2001
reservations@sunsetbeachli.com
www.sunsetbeachli.com

This stylishly retro Shelter Island property is owned by famed boutique hotelier André Balazs of New York's Mercer, L.A.'s Chateau Marmont, and the Standard hotels. Each of the 20 rooms is decked out in mod furniture and white-on-white bedding and has a private terrace, complete with lounge chairs and a view of Crescent Beach and Shelter Island Sound. From Memorial Day to Labor Day, guys sporting crisp, untucked oxford shirts and girls in hip-slung jeans and gladiator sandals pack every inch of the hotel's trilevel beachfront hangout. The sunset over the water pairs well with a minty mojito—the potent and pricey cocktail of choice—or a glass of Sunset Beach Reserve (a rosé developed by Balazs and Hamptons vintner Christian Wölffer). Sunset Beach is open seasonally, from the weekend before Memorial Day until September 12.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Surrey
20 E. 76th Street
Between Madison and Fifth avenues
New York City , New York
10021
Tel: 800 978 7739 (toll-free)
info@thesurrey.com
www.TheSurreyhotel.com

Looking down upon the particularly posh stretch of Madison Avenue, with its crisply dressed passersby and chic little boutiques visible from your perch at The Surrey, you can almost believe that the recession never visited here. After all, it was the 190-room Surrey's providential good luck to have been undergoing a thorough $60 million yearlong renovation up until last November, one that transformed a reliable if unexciting hostelry into one of the neighborhood's most desirable addresses. The new lobby's Art Deco-inspired black-and-dove gray palette is echoed in the generously sized rooms (the bathrooms are particularly large), which feature wide Duxiana beds. Not everything is an unqualified hit—in particular, the weird table lamp with a shower curtain-like shade—but there's a real vision and playful sense of idiosyncrasy at work here. The good design and cheerful, unpretentious staff aside, this isn't a hotel meant for lingering—the only public spaces are the snug lobby, the chic Bar Pleiades, Daniel Boulud's eponymous café (which also provides the room service), and the key-accessed rooftop garden—but why would you want to, anyway? One block south is the gray bulwark of the Whitney Museum, and one block west is Central Park.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Thompson LES
190 Allen Street
New York City , New York
10002
Tel: 212 460 5300
Tel: 877 460 8888 (toll-free)
www.thompsonles.com

Sitting on the intersection of Houston and Allen streets, this new 18-story hotel limns its edgy Lower East Side habitat and the contemporary artists associated with it. Case in point: Each of the 141 rooms comes with a custom light box built into the headboard and showcasing Lee Friedlander photographs; Gerard Malanga's lithographed image of Andy Warhol watches swimmers from the bottom of the third-floor outdoor pool; and the winning Asian-fusion restaurant, Shang (from Canadian super-chef Susur Lee), is decorated with a giant field painting by Peter Halley. As attractive and accommodating as the front desk staff are, even more striking is the lobby wall of delicate black-and-white blown glass. As if mirroring the ongoing gentrification of the Lower East Side, spacious guest rooms manifest the tension between modern luxury and bygone grit: cement ceilings, beaded metal curtains, and exposed wires contrast as well as Sferra linens, Kiehl's products, and floor-to-ceiling windows. The seventh-floor Above Allen, a clubby open-air bar with skyline views, is restricted to hotel guests; its only downside (besides the harsh velvet rope) is the overwhelmingly patterned furniture with orange Stephen Sprouse graphics.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Trump International Hotel & Tower
1 Central Park West
Midtown West
New York City , New York
10023
Tel: 888 448 7867 (toll-free)
Tel: 212 299 1000
contactus@trumpintl.com
www.trumpintl.com

Need further proof of the size of Donald Trump's ego? A couple of years ago, a banner appeared on this hotel taunting guests at the just-opened Mandarin Oriental across the street that the real Central Park view belonged to Trump's customers. After a public lashing, the banner was taken down, but it wasn't an empty boast: His 52-story building does, indeed, block the views of some Mandarin guests. Apart from the vistas—and the thrill of checking into a place owned by the star of The Apprentice—the advantages of staying here will most benefit business travelers. The 167 neutral, comfortable rooms and suites—most of which have kitchens—come with a personal attaché who functions as the guest's very own assistant. There are also a variety of complimentary services (faxes, local calls, pressing, a cell phone). One of the better perks is room service from Jean Georges, the esteemed restaurant downstairs.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Whiteface Lodge
7 Whiteface Inn Lane
Lake Placid , New York
Tel: 800 903 4045
Tel: 518 523 0500
Fax: 518 523 0559
reservations@thewhitefacelodge.com
thewhitefacelodge.com

Every last architectural and decorative detail—from the beams of white pine (harvested from the very acres on which the property sits) to the cast-iron fireplace screens forged by a local blacksmith—is a testament to Adirondack authenticity at this resort built in the Great Camp style. The whole place radiates rustic good taste but doesn't skimp on comfort: The 85 full-kitchen suites, which range from big studios to expansive three-bedroom duplexes, are fitted with pillowtop beds, deep suede couches, thick rugs, heated slate bathroom floors, and private patios. The Great Room, which doubles as the excellent restaurant's dining area, is the pièce de résistance, anchored by two granite fireplaces. Staff are friendly, and since Whiteface Lodge offers amenities both conventional (an indoor/outdoor pool, cross-country ski trails) and unexpected (a movie theater, bowling lanes, a year-round skating rink), the resort nearly matches the variety of activities in the six-million-acre park at its doorstep. A spa and a putting green will open later in 2006.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Yotel
570 Tenth Avenue
New York City , New York
10036
Tel: 877 909 6835
info@yotelnewyork.com
www.YotelNewYork.com

Up-sizing its London airport capsule hotels for a by-the-night rather than by-the-hour crowd, Yotel colonized far west 42nd Street (at Tenth Avenue) in June 2011 with 669 rooms and one Yobot (a luggage-slinging robot in the lobby). As a lesson in design efficiency, retractable queen beds fold into a couch, an alarm clock is integrated into the desk, and cords for the 32-inch flat-screen TV tuck neatly within a built-in cabinet. A glass-enclosed bathroom (with rain shower) and a slice of floor-to-ceiling window make the 170-square-foot rooms feel almost airy. Rounded-edge furnishings, a tan-on-white color scheme, and purplish-blue mood lighting add a Virgin America–esque glow to the surroundings. The property draws an eclectic mix of independent budget travelers who don't mind the fact that—beyond fast, free Wi-Fi and a 24/7 coffee kitchenette on every floor—amenities, and staff, are sparse. A multipurpose central hub on the fourth floor, dubbed Four, has a tiny gym, abbreviated front desk, and expansive lounge space. It gets especially busy during the people-watching free-for-all of the complimentary muffin breakfasts (bananas, a buck each) and evening happy hours, when the gigantic outdoor patio (the largest of any hotel in Manhattan) thumps to techno music and fills with guests noshing on inventive, if uneven, Latin-Asian tapas from the on-site restaurant Dohyo.—Justin Ocean

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.