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New York Shopping

ABC Carpet & Home
881 and 888 Broadway
Gramercy
New York City , New York
10003
Tel: 212 473 3000
www.abchome.com

Despite the fact that the average New Yorker's apartment could generously be compared to a shoebox, the residents of Gotham sure do love their homewares. And nowhere do they more seriously indulge their passion for furnishings, light fixtures, rugs, antiques, draperies, and every kind of big-ticket tchotchke under the sun than at ABC Carpet & Home. Spread across multiple floors and two stores, the beautiful merchandising suggests little environments that could easily be transposed straight into a New York loft. Silk pillows, handblown glass, artfully scuffed French country furniture, delicate glass chandeliers—add several floors worth of exquisite rugs and floor treatments and you have the makings of a swoonworthy afternoon's shopping. The best part: They ship all around the globe. If you're looking for a bargain, you can make the trek up to their outlet store in the Bronx (1055 Bronx River Avenue, 718-842-8772).

Open Mondays through Thursdays 10 am to 3 pm, Fridays 10 am to 6:30 pm, Saturdays 11 am to 7 pm, and Sundays noon to 6:30 pm.

Air and Speed, Montauk
795 Montauk Highway
Montauk , New York
11954
Tel: 631 668 0356
www.airandspeedsurf.com

The East End's go-to surf shop isn't quaint or retro—quite simply, it's got the goods. That means polarized sunglasses by Oakley and Maui Jim, racks of wet suits and sporty swim trunks, and Freestyle and Rip Curl watches. Air and Speed may be the first choice of pros like Kelly Slater when they're in the area, but the shop caters to all ability levels and even to non-surfers. (Some customers just swing by for a gander and some sunblock.) Buying a board will set you back from $550 to $1,200; rentals are also available of soft-top longboards, epoxy short boards, and stand-up paddleboards—as well as Electra beach cruisers, in case you feel like riding something that's not a wave.—Darrell Hartman

Open daily 9 am to 6 pm, high season; 10 am to 4 pm, off-season.

Antiques Shopping in the Hamptons

The Hamptons (especially Sag Harbor and Hampton Bays) are renowned for top-notch antiques outlets, and with good reason. You'll find everything from museum-quality heirlooms to 1950s ephemera to midcentury furniture. The standouts include Good Ground Antique Center, where you can pick up costume jewelry and vintage patio furniture for a song, and Jed, which specializes in theatrical and expensive chinoiserie-inflected designs, such as an elegant ebonized bamboo mirror and midcentury modern finds like an upholstered Robsjohn-Gibbings chaise. The ultimate resource, however, is East Hampton Yard Sale, where proprietor Vincent Manzo's curated mix of well-priced objects (garden statuary, lamp fixtures, vintage posters, and more) comes with plenty of local gossip. The Hamptons also regularly hosts antiques sales, including the annual Historic Mulford Farm Antiques Show & Sale in East Hampton.—Updated by Darrell Hartman

Barneys New York
660 Madison Avenue
Midtown East
New York City , New York
10065
Tel: 212 826 8900
barneys.com

What makes Barneys New York a must-stop for the fashion-forward isn't the comprehensive selection of popular designers (Prada, Manolo Blahnik) or the witty window displays (which would stop any New Yorker in her stilettos). Rather, it's the store's unerring eye for emerging talent. The noteworthy selection takes shape on the main level with jewelry from Lanvin and Sevan, plus a well-curated mix of handbags from brands like Miu Miu and Devi Kroell. In the basement, the revamped beauty level offers the entire lineup of L'Artisan Parfumeur, and cult faves Frédéric Malle and Care by Stella McCartney. While high fashion comes with the uptown prices you'd expect, private label Barneys Collection—formerly helmed by New York fashion darling Behnaz Sarafpour—has more affordable separates and tailored outerwear. Barneys got its start in the 1920s as a men's store, so it's no surprise that the gent's department is an incubator of cool, best known for its made-to-measure dress shirts and edgy accessories, including Berluti shoes and buttery-soft men's bags from Leonello Borghi.

The cheeky, youth-oriented spin-off, Barneys Co-Op, offers a more accessible version of the Barneys experience, be it through vibrant print dresses from London designer Duro Olowu or sustainable fashion from Edun. The basement level is devoted to denim of every stripe, from 18th Amendment to Helmut Lang. Bargain hunters, take note: When Barneys cleans out seasonal merchandise, prices are often slashed over 50 percent at the biannual warehouse sale in Chelsea.

Open Mondays through Saturdays 11 am to 7 pm, Sundays noon to 6 pm.

Bergdorf Goodman
754 Fifth Avenue
Midtown East
New York City , New York
10019
Tel: 212 753 7300
bergdorfgoodman.com

Most department stores have cloned themselves endlessly, populating malls all over America. But there is only one Bergdorf Goodman. In fact, it has such significance in fashion circles that most designers would choose Bergdorf's if forced to display their wares in only one place. The original store and the Men's Store across Fifth Avenue house every important fashion name, both classic and cutting-edge, along with exquisite accessories, jewelry, and haute items for the home. Check out the fifth-floor womenswear (known as 5F) for a comprehensive range of affordable, buzz-worthy names such as Jason Wu and Alexander Wang, along with labels like Theyskens' Theory by Belgian wunderkind Olivier Theyskens. The young designer formerly helmed Rochas and Nina Ricci, and his streamlined designs for the popular mass brand Theory tend to send fashion devotees into a swoon. Recharge at the salonlike Kelly Wearstler–designed BG restaurant on the 7th floor.

Open Mondays through Fridays 10 am to 8 pm, Saturdays 10 am to 7 pm, and Sundays noon to 6 pm.

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Bird
316 Fifth Avenue
Park Slope
Brooklyn , New York
11215
Tel: 718 768 4940
Subway: F train to Seventh Avenue
www.shopbird.com

Bird brands itself as one of Brooklyn's first fashion destinations. That may be something of a stretch, but it certainly was a pioneer when it set up shop in Park Slope in 1999. It still has its finger on the pulse of the city's mercurial fashion trends and feels utterly fresh amid a crop of arrivistes. Up-and-coming designers such as Brooklyn-based Apiece Apart and eco-friendly Bodkin woo a rabidly devoted clientele. And heavy-hitters including Isabel Marant and Alexander Wang, add some high-end polish to the whimsical mix of clothes, handbags, shoes, and accessories. Two additional outposts are located in Cobble Hill and Williamsburg.

Open Monday through Saturday noon to 8 pm, Sunday noon to 6 pm.

Brooklyn Flea
176 Lafayette Avenue
Fort Greene
Brooklyn , New York
11238
Subway: A/C to Lafayette Avenue
www.brooklynflea.com/

Every weekend, over 100 vendors gather under the Brooklyn Flea banner to sell all manner of cool stuff—from vintage and locally designed duds to antique furniture; arts and crafts; and food, glorious food (we recommend the fresh fruit and herb combo popsicles by People's Pops and Asia Dog's beef, chicken, and veggie franks with yummy toppings like Japanese curry and shredded kimchi apples). Plan on spending a couple of hours browsing and chatting with the vendors—it's a great way to plug into the Brooklyn scene. The Flea is held outdoors in Fort Greene on Saturdays (rain or shine) and indoors at 1 Hanson, the former Williamsburgh Savings Bank, on Sundays. Every Friday at noon, the list goes up on the market's Web site of the vendors taking part that weekend.—Nicola McCormack

Open Saturdays and Sundays 10 am to 5 pm.

CB I Hate Perfume Gallery
93 Wythe Avenue
Williamsburg
Brooklyn , New York
11211
Tel: 718 384 6890
Subway: L train to Bedford Avenue
www.cbihateperfume.com

Christopher Brosius launched this perfume "gallery" in 2004 on the heels of his lauded exhibition at the Cooper-Hewitt Design Triennial. It's a delightful jewel box of a store that encourages browsing, with nature installations (pebbles, moss, and seashells) periodically reworked by a stylist and "tasting notes" that accompany each fragrance. The description of one best seller, called At The Beach 1966: "This is the scent of warm skin covered in suntan lotion and fresh ocean water mixed with hints of sand, driftwood, seashell, and old weathered boardwalk." Brosius fashions his shop as a kind of anti-Sephora—he compounds and blends ingredients himself and limits his use of synthetic materials. Perfumes are typically sold in essential oil "Absolutes," "Water Perfumes," or "Home Sprays." No surprise perhaps that offbeat variations find favor in this corner of Williamsburg: "Greenbriar 1968," a fragrance made from an unusual blend of sawdust, fresh-cut hay, old leather, pipe tobacco, and dirt, has done quite well.

Open Tuesday through Saturday noon to 6 pm.

Century 21
22 Cortlandt Street
Financial District
New York City , New York
10007
Tel: 212 227 9092
c21stores.com

This department store, known for selling designer fashions at heavily discounted prices, achieved a second degree of fame when it was seriously damaged in the World Trade Center attacks. Several months and millions of dollars in repairs later, it reopened in its original site, just across from Ground Zero—and as the women of Sex and the City famously put it in one episode, it is everyone's civic duty to go there and spend money. It's also in one's economic best interest. Prices on everything—men's and women's fashions, shoes, housewares, cosmetics—are much lower than they would be anywhere else. You have to have nerves of steel to do hand-to-hand combat for the bargain goods, but the rewards are many.

Open Mondays through Wednesdays 7:45 am to 8 pm, Thursdays and Fridays 7:45 am to 9:30 pm, Saturdays 10 am to 9 pm, and Sundays 11 am to 8 pm.

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East Village/Lower East Side/Nolita

Some of the city's most idiosyncratic and memorable shopping can be found in the East Village and the Lower East Side, neighborhoods which so far have remained immune to the plague of chain stores and franchises. Vintage clothing, street wear, and vinyl stores abound, and the narrow, awning-covered streets (particularly around Chinatown) can feel like a bustling Asian market, with noisy vendors and riotous, colorful stores whose wares spill onto the sidewalks.

Canny homemakers and stylists alike flock to Zarin Fabrics, a giant 1930s-era warehouse on the edge of Chinatown stocking high-quality fabric and drapery—from damask to mohair to racy animal prints—at discounted prices. Hunt for the perfect items to complement your draperies at John Derian. Plates, trays, and lamps are decoupaged with vintage prints and old typewritten letters, with French terra-cotta earthenware by Astier de Villatte and taxidermy and art by Hugo Guinness rounding out the eclectic mix.

Guys hungry for that happy medium between preppy and hipster frequent Odin, a men's boutique known for its butter-soft tees and well-curated mix of cutting-edge labels like Rag & Bone and Rogue's Gallery. Their girlfriends and wives flock to Sigerson Morrison, whose shoes are the Jimmy Choos of the downtown set. Also check out their less expensive line, Belle, in a separate storefront around the corner.

For grown-up womenswear with a slightly conceptual bent, you won't want to miss No. 6, a pared-back boutique owned by two friends—a stylist and a vintage collector—who stock designers such as Staerk, Stine Goya, and Christian Wijnants; vintage pieces; and their own line of clothing and shoes in an androgynous Belgian mode. More like a members-only club than a clothes shop (you have to be buzzed in), Alife Rivington is actually two adjacent boutiques where hipsters with deep pockets go to stock up on ironic tees, limited-edition kicks, and hoodies. The vibe is far from thrift store though—the shelves are spotless, the displays immaculate, and an air of quiet reverence prevails. Foley+Carinna, on the other hand, embraces the thrift-store vibe. Infectious dance music plays as you peruse sparkly, lacy garments; oversize costume jewelry; and vintage clothes and shoes. The fashion-forward line of tote bags is worth stopping for as well.

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The Elegant Setting
27 W. Main Street
Southampton , New York
11968
Tel: 888 277 8837
www.theelegantsetting.com

Hamptons hosts rely on Stephanie Finkelstein's shop for custom party cups and cocktail napkins, but the store is also a great place for guests seeking to return the favor. Inside a 400-square-foot bungalow at the end of an alleyway a few steps off Southampton's main drag, the Elegant Setting sells resort-town necessities ranging from beach towels and cotton throw blankets to leather-handled canvas totes—all of which can be monogrammed on-site. Summery, personalized status symbols are the specialty here: Nautical motifs are a popular choice on the made-to-order items, and ultrapreppy Smathers & Branson needlepoint key fobs come embroidered with the various Hamptons ZIP codes. Even if you don't own property in the East End, the valets will think you do.—Updated by Darrell Hartman

Open Thursdays through Sundays 10 am to 5 pm.

Eva Gentry
389 Atlantic Avenue
Boerum Hill
Brooklyn , New York
11217
Tel: 718 260 903
Subway: F train to Bergen Street
www.evagentry.com

Even if the Dries Van Noten, Rick Owens, and Ann Demeulemeester pieces that grace the perfectly curated racks of clothing are out of your price range, Eva Gentry (formerly known as Butter) is well worth a look. The jewelry, accessories, footwear, and clothing are shown in a gallery-like high-ceilinged white space. For those who can live with being a few seasons out of date, Eva Gentry's consignment store, a couple of doors down, will ensure you won't go home empty-handed (371 Atlantic Ave.; 718-522-3522).—Nicola McCormack

Open Mondays through Saturdays 11 am to 7 pm, Sundays noon to 6 pm.

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Future Perfect
115 N. Sixth Street
Williamsburg
Brooklyn , New York
11211
Tel: 718 599 6278
Subway: L train to Bedford Avenue
www.thefutureperfect.com

This cultish design hub in Williamsburg has become an incubator of sorts for up-and-coming Brooklyn talent (it was the first to carry ceramic antler chandeliers, a Jason Miller signature piece). The merchandise is definitely idiosyncratic, but if you suddenly find yourself living in a West Elm catalog, this is a good way to add some pizzazz. Standout buys include metallic-gold oil lamps made from hand grenades, and Louis XV reproduction antique chairs upholstered with army fatigue patterns and emblazoned with graffiti. Functional pieces do anchor the store, however. Storage cubes and desks by Scrapile, a local outfit that fuses discarded wood scraps into beautiful modern furniture, could fit into any creative office space. And Andrea Claire's circular lampshades, with digital landscapes superimposed onto linen frames, are both subtle and chic.

Open daily from noon to 7 pm.

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Henri Bendel
712 Fifth Avenue
Midtown East
New York City , New York
10019
Tel: 212 247 1100
henribendel.com

In years past, if Bergdorf Goodman was the glamorous older sibling and Barneys the avant-garde individualist, the original Henri Bendel was the fun, fashion-forward little sister of New York City department stores. This was the first U.S. store to stock Chanel and championed offbeat yet fabulous fashion brands like Sonia Rykiel and Matthew Williamson, after all. But in 2009, the parent company shut down the clothes department in order to concentrate solely on accessories and beauty products. While the loss was felt keenly by fashion followers, there's still glamour to be found in the flagship store, which is made up of three late-19th-century town houses with the original Lalique windows and glass-domed ceiling intact. The beauty department stocks brands such as Trish McEvoy, Laura Mercier, and YSL, and you'll find jewelry and bags from Rebecca Minkoff, Tom Binns, and Miriam Haskell spread around the shop. There are more affordable options, as well, including snakeskin wristlets for under $100.—Emma Sloley

Open Mondays through Saturdays 10 am to 8 pm, Sundays noon to 7 pm.

Hollander & Lexer
358 Atlantic Avenue
Boerum Hill
Brooklyn , New York
11217
Tel: 718 797 9190
Subway: A or C train to Hoyt Street

The Boerum Hill menswear boutique that set up shop in spring 2006 on Atlantic Avenue added a much-needed jolt of sartorial panache to the neighborhood. It's an intriguing space, with salvaged lamp fixtures, taxidermy, the odd assortment of antique tools, and brick walls painted over with lacquer. The emphasis is on labels that adhere to solid craftsmanship: Henley shirts from Maine-based Rogues Gallery and denim by Rag & Bone are staples alongside Hollander & Lexer's in-house label of shirts, jackets, and slacks. Dandyish brands such as Paul Smith fill in the gaps, though, as do found objects such as leather belts studded with coins the Moroccan-born owner finds on his foraging trips abroad. It's also something of a lifestyle store, with its Moleskine journals, shaving kits from Acqua Shave, wool blankets, and canvas doctor's bags by Billy Kirk. Across the street is their furniture store, Darr (369 Atlantic Ave.; 718-797-9733; www.shopdarr.com).

Open Monday through Saturday 11 am to 7 pm, Sunday noon to 6 pm.

Homenature
6 Main Street
Southampton , New York
11968
Tel: 631 287 6277
www.homenature.com

To supply this home-design store at the far end of Southampton's Main Street retail drag, proprietor John Heilmann relies on his terrific eye and spot-on sensibility. Driftwood candelabra, coral candlesticks, sea grass rugs, and antique bookends carved into the shape of dachshunds and Boston terriers are just some of the trappings of the genteel seaside life sold here. Further temptations include Molton Brown scented candles, striped Sunbrella pillows, nickel-glass hurricane lamps, and quartz salt and pepper shakers. Even the briefest browse around this boutique will make you want to snap up one of the chic waxed duffel bags Heilmann sells and fill it with desirable loot.—Updated by Darrell Hartman

Open daily 11 am to 5 pm.

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Isabel Marant
469 Broome Street
Soho
New York City , New York
10013
Tel: 212 219 2284
www.isabelmarant.tm.fr/index-en.php

New York ingenues hailed the arrival of French brand Isabel Marant's first U.S. store in 2010 as a fashion coup. A certain kind of cool girl was left disgruntled about it, however—the kind who used to be able to return from Paris with that covetable little item that all her friends would envy. Now those friends can just walk into Marant's quirky-cool NYC boutique, with its polished concrete floors and off-kilter blond-wood dressing rooms, and find those insouciantly glamorous things for themselves, without a transatlantic flight. Marant's genius lies in her way with textures that create a lived-in, slightly vintage patina, making every garment feel like an old favorite. Silky-soft boyfriend sweaters, superbly tailored blazers, and slinky cocktail dresses that hang off the body just so are the kind of pieces you reach for time and again, particularly when you're keen to be mistaken for a cigarette-dangling Parisian chanteuse.—Emma Sloley

Open Mondays through Fridays 11 am to 7 pm, Saturdays 11 am to 8 pm, and Sundays noon to 6 pm.

Jeffrey
449 W. 14th Street
West Village
New York City , New York
10014
Tel: 212 206 1272
jeffreynewyork.com

Jeffrey Kalinsky is nothing less than a New York legend: The former Barneys shoe buyer has made thousands of fashion-hungry downtown men and women very happy since opening his eponymous store in the Meatpacking District in 1999 (long before it was de rigueur to open up shop here). His was the first high-end designer department store in the neighborhood, and these days the Chanel-and-diamond-wearing crowd happily makes the pilgrimage downtown to see what's he's got in store. The long narrow space is—fittingly enough—reminiscent of a catwalk, with an elegant fountain breaking up the various sections. Staff are surprisingly free of snootiness (in fact, we'd venture to say it's one of the friendliest upscale retailers around) and it's a sheer delight to browse the racks for red carpet–ready offerings from names like Valentino, Gucci, and Giambattista Valli.

Open Mondays through Wednesdays and Fridays 10 am to 8 pm, Thursdays 10 am to 9 pm, Saturdays 10 am to 7 pm, and Sundays 12.30 to 6 pm.

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John Varvatos
315 Bowery
East Village
New York City , New York
10003
Tel: 212 358 0315
www.johnvarvatos.com

John Varvatos had a lot to prove in 2008 when he opened his flagship store within the hallowed walls that once housed the legendary Bowery nightclub CBGB. The fearless menswear designer shrewdly ran with the space's history, playing up the rock 'n' roll connection with props like guitars, custom-built stages, and walls of speakers. The clothes have a rock star sensibility as well: skinny suits, distressed leather boots, and vintage band T-shirts. Varvatos' ubiquitous ad campaign features music legends such as Iggy Pop and Alice Cooper.—Emma Sloley

Open Mondays through Saturdays 11 am to 8 pm, Sundays noon to 6 pm.

Kiosk
95 Spring Street, Second Floor
Soho
New York City , New York
10012
Tel: 212 226 8601
kioskkiosk.com

Kiosk is a well-curated design shop that sells products from different countries, available for several months at a time. The inaugural exhibit in December 2005 featured Japanese designs, more recent collections have come from Germany, Bulgaria, Turkey, and India. To describe the offerings as quirky sounds like a cliché, but there's no one word to encompass the selection, which could include ceramics, office supplies, baby products, electronics, and anything else that catches the eye of owner Alisa Grifo, a former set designer and props stylist. Prices are very reasonable, and the products, for the most part, won't be found anywhere else in town.

Open Tuesdays through Saturdays 1 to 7 pm.

Kirna Zabête
96 Greene Street
Soho
New York City , New York
10012
Tel: 212 941 9656
kirnazabete.com

The owners of this trailblazing Soho boutique, Beth Buccini and Sarah Easley, think like fashion editors: They sift through the endless sartorial offerings that come down the catwalks each season and manage to choose exactly what the cool girls want to wear right now. The light-filled space reads like a contemporary gallery for fashion, with a Lucite roof, glossy red railings, and low-slung sofas (all the better for viewing the works of art hanging on the racks). Part of this downtown institution's appeal is the blend of reverence—high style devotees can name-check the fashion world's most important labels (Lanvin, Alaïa, Balenciaga, Nina Ricci)—and kitsch (supplement your museum-worthy dress purchase with a limited-edition, Japanese-inspired Kirna Zabête toy or some old-school candies). Downstairs you'll find children's wear, pet accessories, and lingerie.

Open Mondays through Saturdays 11am to 7 pm, Sundays noon to 6 pm.

Marc Jacobs
marcjacobs.com

In spite of calling Paris home these days, Marc Jacobs will always belong to New York, the city where his multifarious design talents reached their nexus. It's possible, given a few hours to spare, to experience the entirety of Jacobs's creative genius, from the refined, avant-garde lines of his ready-to-wear collection on Soho's Mercer Street, to the quirky-cute accessories stores in the West Village. Bleecker Street lays claim to four of the most sought-after shopfronts in the empire, including his diffusion line, Marc by Marc Jacobs, which has a devoted cult following. Window displays change with the seasons (and the whims of the design team). Expect anything from a sexed-up Santa posing with shoppers for Christmas portraits (Polaroids which are then plastered all over the windows) to beds of tulips heralding spring. While young women comprise Marc's most ardent fan base, he doesn't neglect the rest of the family: The West Village empire extends to a children's line, Little Marc, and a men's ready-to-wear store. To get the best perspective on just how beloved Mr. Jacobs's vision is in this town, drop by the accessories store, where his coveted handbags and shoes inspire mob scenes every weekend.

Midtown

It's no coincidence that when people think of shopping in New York, they think of midtown—the buzzy commercial center of Manhattan harbors some of the country's best, and most expensive, retail space. Upper Madison Avenue is a virtual encyclopedia of the world's finest luxury brands, while tony Fifth Avenue has its own share of gilded names (many top brands have outposts on both). New York's great department stores, including Bergdorf Goodman, Barneys, and Henri Bendel, can each warrant full-day excursions in themselves.

There's no such thing as downtime at Tiffany & Co.'s Fifth Avenue flagship. From the moment those hallowed doors open until they clang shut at night, the place is crawling with dazzled tourists, Upper East Side dowagers looking to add to their collections, and starry-eyed couples shopping for the big one. There's no surer way to qualify for parent of the year than by taking junior family members to FAO Schwarz. File past the toy soldier doormen into a cavernous space filled with everything from life-size stuffed animals to charmingly old-fashioned wooden toys. Art and design lovers find nirvana at the MoMA store, with for-sale versions of the high-design exhibits, Alvar Aalto glass vases, wacky Lomo cameras, and plenty of oddball items such as oversize novelty phones that really work and a modernist Flexus glass menorah.

Tom Ford's three-story flagship near Barneys is tricked out like a gentlemen's pied à terre with everything the modern dandy needs, from a tailoring service to a fragrance department. A few blocks north is Christian Louboutin, whose iconic red-soled heels are the cornerstone of many a New York woman's shoe collection. You don't have to be a bride-to-be to appreciate the wares at Vera Wang, a study in understated chic, from the vases of dark purple lilies to the racks of beautifully tailored resort and ready-to-wear at the top of the spiral staircase. (Viewing bridal wear is by appointment only.)

It might not be on the gilded retail strip, but Jean's Silversmiths is a gem worth hunting down—an insider source for vintage and estate jewelry as well as over 2,000 flatware patterns and sterling silver sets from American, English, Danish, and European designers.

Moss
150 Greene Street
Soho
New York City , New York
10012
Tel: 212 204 7100
mossonline.com

It would be easy to mistake Moss for a bite-size museum: Items in this design store range from porcelain plates from the 18th century to the latest Scandinavian furniture. But yes, it's all for sale, from the pocket flashlight by Lexon Design of France, which costs less than $20, to a bright-red, vintage Borsani articulating chair—to the tune of $6,500. Owner Murray Moss picks the goods himself and originally built a reputation by selling housewares and objets d'art by heavyweights like Ted Muehling, Hella Jongerius, and Tord Boontje. You never know what to expect—you might find a classic Sèvres porcelain bust of Molière in the corner or a set of Laguiole knives with candy-colored handles by the counter. There is also an art gallery next door.

Open Mondays through Saturdays 11 am to 7 pm, Sundays noon to 6 pm.

Opening Ceremony
35 Howard Street
Soho
New York City , New York
10013
Tel: 212 219 2688
openingceremony.us

This Soho boutique—whose proudly '80s font hints at the decade most revered within —displays work by a different country's designers each year, plus a smattering of Americans for good measure. Back in 2006, the favored nation was England, with a mini Topshop installed on the second floor (complete with the trendiest offerings, including the store's famous super-skinny jeans). In 2007, the focus switched to Swedish designers. Recently, the store commissioned Chloë Sevigny, the It girl of downtown style, to design a capsule range: Standout items included a floral dress with built-in bustier and a high-waist pencil skirt. Regardless of the country, the mix here is avant-garde and never boring (if occasionally verging on the unwearable). Less daring shoppers should stick to the prettier offerings, like fun cocktail dresses from Vena Cava.

Open Mondays through Saturdays 11 am to 8 pm, Sundays noon to 7 pm.

Prada
575 Broadway
Soho
New York City , New York
10012
Tel: 212 334 8888
prada.com

Part of Miuccia Prada's undisputed genius is her ability to fuse fashion with art, and that talent is on impressive display at the New York flagship in Soho. Conceived by Dutch starchitect Rem Koolhaas, this former downtown branch of the Guggenheim Museum features a dramatic staircase (populated by headless mannequins) that faces a giant wooden halfpipe, subterranean display rooms that feel like the costume department of a theater, and enormous wall murals running the length of the 23,000-square-foot space. While the main level feels more like a deserted showroom than a retail environment, downstairs houses a warren of small rooms displaying the latest collections, handbags, and shoes. It's all a bit of a trip, and one you'll be talking about long after you get your purchases home.

Open Mondays through Saturdays 11 am to 7 pm, Sundays noon to 7 pm.

Rag & Bone
100 Christopher Street
West Village
New York City , New York
10014
Tel: 212 727 2999
www.rag-bone.com

Along with being two of the nicest people in fashion (not to mention rather, ahem, easy on the eyes), British transplants David Neville and Marcus Wainwright create designs that suggest the wardrobe of an off-duty model, an influence no doubt gleaned from the coterie of actual models and early adopters in the pair's orbit. Inspired variously by classic English tailoring, traditional American workwear, and military motifs, Rag & Bone hits that perfect, ever-so-slightly androgynous urban-warrior note every season with their jeans, T-shirts, and Henleys. The men's flagship is on a once-gritty stretch of Christopher Street in the West Village (the women's shop is a couple of doors down at number 104). The pair has also opened Soho and Upper West Side branches.—Emma Sloley

Open daily noon to 7 pm.

Sahadi's
187 Atlantic Avenue
Brooklyn Heights
Brooklyn , New York
11211
Tel: 718 624 4550
Subway: N, R, W, 2, 3, 4, 5 trains to Borough Hall
www.sahadis.com

This Middle Eastern supermarket is one of the few remnants of the ethnic enclave that once thrived on the Atlantic Avenue corridor. Homesick Arabs from around the state come to visit for staples such as Al Wadi preserves and hummus dips, but it's just as popular with foodies down from Brooklyn Heights wanting a bit of a respite from Whole Foods. Half the fun is imagining up a good use for, say, mahleb (a spice made from the inside of cherry pits used to flavor Syrian string cheese). The store doubles as a wholesaler and distributor, so prices are kept lower that one might expect for such exotic imports. Indeed many of its samplings are stored in bulk: vats of olives, buckets of grape leaves, and bins of bulgur line the walls. You don't need to be on an obscure stockpiling mission, however, as there's a deli in back with prepared food including feta-cheese salad, hummus, and baba ghanoush.

Open Monday through Saturday 9 am to 7 pm.

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Share With…Montauk
764 Montauk Highway
Montauk , New York
11954
Tel: 631 668 2205
www.sharewith.org

Former Calypso designer Joelle Klein has catered to denizens of the new Montauk with her sustainability-oriented beach shop since 2008. Sourced from all over the world, her offerings include Lostmarc'h fragrances and distressed sailor-stripe tops from Klein's native France, traditional Tunisian hammam towels, and espadrilles from Spain. Many items, such as recycled-paper ballerina flats and T-shirts made from old petticoats, come with fascinating backstories and are the sort of things you want to wear right out of the shop. Klein also sells coffee-table books on everything from architecture to surfing, and devotes the adjacent space to a different emerging label each summer.—Darrell Hartman

Open Sundays through Fridays 10 am to 6 pm, Saturdays 10 am to 7 pm,May through early September; Thursdays through Mondays 10 am to 6 pm, early September through April.

Smith + Butler
225 Smith Street
Cobble Hill
Brooklyn , New York
11231
Tel: 718 855 4295
Subway: F train to Carroll Street
www.smithbutler.com

If you're forever in search of the classic buy and are drawn to the aesthetic of brands like Belstaff, Filson, Barbour, and Moscot, then Smith + Butler is your kind of place. This 1900s carriage house has womenswear up front, home goods in the middle, and menswear in the back room (including New York label Unis's only Brooklyn outpost). It's also crammed with interesting miscellany like floral plates printed with the deadly sins in a Gothic font and books on California's 1970s rock climbers and rock 'n' roll fashions. Everything is placed on and around antique furniture and vintage motorcycles (bike enthusiasts will also love the cool motorcycle accessories sold here) in a way that encourages browsing as much as buying. A huge glass case shows off beautiful handcrafted jewelry, 90 percent of which is by local designers like Yayoi Forest. This place ain't cheap, but that's the thing about a classic buy—you can just keep telling yourself it's expensive because it lasts.—Nicola McCormack

Open Mondays noon to 6 pm, Tuesdays through Thursdays 11 am to 7 pm, Fridays noon to 8 pm, Saturdays 11 am to 8 pm, and Sundays noon to 6 pm.

Soho

The area south of Houston has come in and out of fashion over the years, but one thing remains consistent: its high-hip shopping status. Weekends can be chaotic in these parts, between the harried locals, out-of-towners window shopping, and beautiful people clogging the cafés (Downtown Cipriani makes a prime coffee-break spot, if only for the chance to ogle the Euro jet set who frequent it). If possible, visit Soho during the week, when things are quieter and shop attendants aren't quite as preoccupied.

Start on Broadway, worship at the altar of Prada, and work your way over to Sixth Avenue by way of the neighborhood's cobblestone side streets. 3.1 Phillip Lim, an airy, uncluttered space, highlights the architectural dresses and diaphanous cardigans of one of the city's biggest design stars. For something a little racier, head to Kiki de Montparnasse, an upscale lingerie and "intimacy products" store that feels like the parlor of a particularly sophisticated dominatrix. Ina is the place to go for near-new designer wear like Chanel and Balenciaga that's often only a season out of date (sometimes less).

Natural history buffs will love Evolution, where every kind of fossil, bone, skull, medical model, and animal skin can be found, as well as less startling specimens like tribal art and seashells. Continue the theme at Distant Origin, where you'll find antler-based table lamps, zebra-skin poufs, and fur throw pillows mixed with Lucite stag heads, Fortuny silk lamps, and black glass chandeliers. Further east, drop in on Filipino jeweler Federico de Vera, whose madcap shop is filled with interesting antiques like Khmer sculptures, ivory combs, tortoiseshell boxes, and blown-glass insects. Moss feels like a small museum with carefully curated items that run the gamut from porcelain busts to Scandinavian side tables. You'll find more classic pieces at Ted Muehling's small shop on Howard Street, on the neighborhood's southeast fringe. The delicate silver and gold pieces include slightly asymmetrical oval bangles and earrings resembling grains of rice.

Sylvester & Co.
103 Main Street
Sag Harbor , New York
11963
Tel: 631 725 5012
www.sylvesterathome.com

Searching for a set of bamboo-and-cotton sheets, spiked olives, or gingersnap cookies? This modern take on a general store in Sag Harbor is your one-stop shop. Among the gifts and essential items for the stylish Hamptons home, you'll find placemats in rainbow colors, Tea Forté teas, nautical-knot doorstops, patchouli bath oils, jauntily striped pajamas, and confections ranging from Marie Belle and Michel Cluizel chocolates to plump sour-cherry oatmeal cookies. Grab a coffee at the long counter and create a temporary masterpiece on one of the Etch A Sketches. A second outpost (with a similarly eclectic but more home-oriented selection) is located in Amagansett.—Updated by Darrell Hartman

Hotel Photo
West Village/Meatpacking District

The West Village lays claim to some of the city's best microneighborhoods, from the upscale far reaches of the Meatpacking District to the gourmet wonderland of Bleecker Street at its southern end (for foodies, Murray's Cheese at No. 254 is a worthy pilgrimage all on its own). Spend your way down Bleecker between West 10th and Hudson to see big-name haunts like Ralph Lauren, Juicy Couture, Mulberry, and Intermix, leaving plenty of time to pay homage to the block between 11th and Bank Street, also known as "Marc Jacobs Land".

Veer west after Bleecker meets Hudson and you'll find the Meatpacking District, which long ago transitioned from blue collar to boutique. Two blocks up Hudson Street is Elizabeth Charles, home of hard-to-find Australian and New Zealand labels such as Lover, Jayson Brundson, and Karen Walker.

Most of the noteworthy Meatpacking retailers are clustered on and around West 14th Street. Neighborhood pioneer Jeffrey is haute without attitude and is the place to go for both mens and womens footwear. Stella McCartney's flagship has her trademark floaty dresses, sexy separates, and animal-friendly accessories next door is the inventive DDCLab, a design studio known for its futuristic fabrics and sophisticated takes on denim. Blink and you'll walk right by Ten Thousand Things, a small jewelry store showcasing David Rees and Ron Anderson's understated, sculptural pieces. Diane Von Furstenberg's sexy, Pop-bright space on the corner of Washington Street highlights her famous wrap dresses. Skip across over the road to one of Scoop's four neighboring stores for a great edit of right-this-minute labels like Anya Hindmarch resort wear and Alice Temperley bags.

For those with energy (and cash) to spare, you can continue your retail rampage south or east of the Meatpacking district to shops like Flight 001 on Greenwich Avenue, which stocks Orla Kiely roll-ons, quirky luggage decals, passport holders, and more. Then head around the corner on Jane Street to the Pierre Hardy boutique, the brand's first outside of Paris. The opening was greeted with grand enthusiasm by the six-inch-heel set, which flocks here for architectural stilettos, fabulous wedges, and sexier-than-they-have-a-right-to-be pumps. There's also a selection of beautifully made brogues and high-end leather sneakers for men.

Young Designer's Market
268 Mulberry Street
Little Italy
New York City , New York
10012
themarketnyc.com

What's true of most cities also applies to New York: If you want to take the temperature of the town's tastes and style, get to a market. The Young Designer's Market, which operates out of a church gym on weekends, is a good primer on the future generation of fashion tastemakers: Designers, milliners, jewelers, and accessories makers set up (and usually man) stalls displaying their designs, which offers visitors the unique opportunity of conversing with the creators firsthand. Sure, there's a bit of dross to sift through, but there are always gems to be found among the crowded aisles. The labels on display change from week to week, but some recent standouts included cute, vintage-inspired cloche hats by Charm NYC; waist-cinching leather belts from Jetta Boone; and some gorgeous beaten-gold cuffs at the stall of Jennifer Young, who designs under the name Chameleon. The best part of finding something you like? You can expect to pay a mere fraction of the price for comparable pieces in high-end stores.

Open Saturdays and Sundays 11 am to 7 pm.

Yoyamart
15 Gansevoort Street
West Village
New York City , New York
10014
Tel: 212 242 5511
www.yoyashop.com

If you don't have kids, Yoyamart will make you want to raise a family just so you can shop here. On the eastern edge of the Meatpacking District, it was conceived as a shopping experience for a cool dad, and stocks things that would be equally at home in a kid's room as in an adult's. You'll find the requisite cool kid-sized Y3 Adidas sneakers, miniature Diesel and Juicy Couture frocks, and removable vinyl wall graphics, as well as novelty toys from Japan, Lomo cameras, Dinh Van jewelry, and a selection of DVDs including Schoolhouse Rock and films by Hayao Miyazaki (of Spirited Away fame). There's a baby store with modernist nursery furniture one block away.

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.