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My next trip: Utah

My next trip: Utah

By
Trip Plan Tags: 
arts + culture,
festival,
skiing + snowboarding
Destinations: 
Midtown West,
New York,
New York City,
North America,
Park City,
United States,
Utah

Fun trip to Utah

ITEMS

See + Do

American Folk Art Museum, New York

45 W. 53rd Street, Midtown West
New York City, New York 10019
Tel: 212 265 1040
Website: www.folkartmuseum.org

Like the Guggenheim, this Midtown museum, which opened in 2001, is as notable for its building as for its collections. The exterior is a patchwork of bronze alloy panels that change hue according to the position of the sun; the interior is a series of open spaces dramatically illuminated by skylights. The 4,000-object collection spans 300 years of folk art, including intricate quilts, weather vanes, and paintings.

Nightlife

Performing Arts, Utah

Park City, Utah

Park City isn't just about the film festival—this little town has performance venues that would do any city proud. The 266-seat Egyptian Theatre, a historic 1926 edifice that stages locally produced Broadway shows year-round, is worth a peek for the scarabs and hieroglyphs (328 Main St.; 435-645-0671; www.egyptiantheatrecompany.org). Across town, the 1,300-seat Eccles Center for the Performing Arts books the likes of Bernadette Peters, Wynonna Judd, Momix, and Cyndi Lauper (1750 Kearns Blvd.; 435-655-3114; www.ecclescenter.org). In summer, Deer Valley resort hosts two dozen–plus concerts in its outdoor amphitheater; bring a picnic and a blanket to watch performances of the Utah Symphony, Tony Bennett, and the Park City Jazz Festival.

Nightlife

Harry O's, Utah

427 Main Street
Park City, Utah 84060
Tel: 435 655 7579
Website: www.harryos-pc.com

This is where you go to make the scene in li'l ol' Park City. The Paris Hiltons and Diddys of the world have been known to make appearances at this dance hall/lounge/concert venue, the town's largest. Live acts (big names like John Legend as well as local reggae and hip-hop bands) and DJs spinning house appeal to both the ski-bum and celeb sets. New York designer Steve Lewis (of the Palladium and Twilo) created the lounge. Saturday night brings in DJs from L.A. and Vegas.

The lounge is open daily, though the concert hall is closed Sun–Tues.

Shop

Mary Jane's, Utah

613 Main Street
Park City, Utah 84060
Tel: 435 645 7463
Website: www.maryjanesshoes.com

This duo of shops is fun for the whole family. Head down the stairs to Mary Jane's for footwear, apparel, and accessories for women by over 200 designers. Seychelles and Jeffrey Campbell provide boots and shoes, and local jewelry maker RJ Designs creates slightly off-center sterling-silver hoops and hearts that dangle from necklaces or are looped into earrings. Also look for clothing by Charlotte Ronson, Nick & Mo, and Scrapbook. In the smaller baby section, you'll find hot little leather shoes, plus hats, blankets, and outfits from Cade & Co.

Open Mondays through Thursdays 10 am to 6 pm, Fridays and Saturdays 10 am to 8 pm, Sundays 11 am to 6 pm.

Chloe Lane

See + Do

Utah Olympic Park, Utah

3419 Olympic Parkway
Park City, Utah 84098
Tel: 435 658 4200
Website: olyparks.com

This 389-acre facility is an official U.S. Olympic training site (several 2002 Olympic events were held here), but it's also a playground on steroids that includes swooping ski jumps and a twisty, turn-y bobsled, skeleton, and luge track. While athletes are still seriously prepping for Gold here, virtually everything is open to the public, either for gaping or for participating. In winter, you and two pals can feel 5Gs as a pro bobsled pilot zooms you down the track at up to 80 mph. Or try a 50-mph skeleton ride—belly down, face first—by your lonesome. Come summer, visitors can experience the world's steepest zip line and rocket down the alpine slide. True adrenaline junkies can sign up for introductory clinics in aerials (now there's a cool way into the pool) and other sports. The more mild-mannered can safely peruse the park's museum, watch films of Olympic events, and see costumes, medals, and the giant buffalo made of off-white silk used in the 2002 opening ceremony.—Updated by Sarah Tuff

See + Do

Sundance Film Festival, Utah

Park City, Utah
Email: festivaltickets@sundance.org
Website: www.sundance.org

There are many experiences to be had at Sundance: fabulous Miramax parties, seeing the next Golden Globe–winner before anyone else, gawking at the attending celebs. The Festival takes place each January, and the downside of being in Park City at this time can be the long lines for movie tickets and events, the overcrowded everything, and the affectations of wannabe stars. The upside includes sitting next to starlets on the free city bus and having unscreened DVDs shoved into your hands.


Some survival tips: Book your flight, hotel, or condo through the all-in-one Sundance travel service (877-733-7829). Also consider buying the $2,500 Express Pass, which gets you into every screening. (Due to limited quantity, passes are sold via online lottery. Log on to the website in September or October to sign up—if you're one of the lucky ones selected at random, you will be assigned a specific time to call and make your purchase.) Otherwise your best bet is to buy your tickets on-site. Individual tickets go on sale in January, but screenings are often canceled or rescheduled, so it's easier to make your picks at the last minute, after hearing the latest buzz. Although this means standing in line, you'll find the scene social, chatty, and fun.


Once you're inside the theater, don't be afraid to walk out on a picture that's not grabbing your attention—there are far too many great films to be wasting your time. Also worthwhile: the indie sideshow festivals such as Slamdance, which show more avant-garde fare (323-466-1786; slamdance.com).

See + Do

Park City Golf Club, Utah

1541 Thaynes Canyon Drive
Park City, Utah 84060
Tel: 435 615 5800
Website: www.parkcitygolfclub.org

The rolling countryside, expert landscaping, and dramatic views of the surrounding mountains give the Park City Golf Club an exclusive feel. Happily, however, it's public. And tough. Most holes have water hazards and sand bunkers, and playing at altitude makes the 18 holes a lot more strenuous.

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.