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Peru Hotels

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Andean Lodges
Camino del Apu Ausangate
Peru
Tel: 51 84 261 517
reservas@andeanlodges.com
www.andeanlodges.com

The four stone eco-lodges that serve as tambos (crash pads, more or less, in Quechua) allow you to hike the Camino del Apu Ausangate in unprecedented comfort (blazing fireplaces, hot showers, and soaring great-room windows). Before the 2008 arrival of the lodges, this remote retreat had been the sole province of tent-packing trekkers. The scenery is the definition of otherworldly: At points, lunar landscapes give way to red-, yellow-, and green-striped isosceles mountains. But the real alternate universe is that of the locals: isolated, traditionally clad llama and alpaca herders who essentially, and remarkably sweetly, serve as your Sherpas. Note: This is a physically demanding trip. For details, read the answer to the first FAQ ("How difficult is the trekking?") on the Andean Lodges Web site. The lodges can get cold at night, so pack your warmest thermals for bedtime.—Abbie Kozolchyk

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
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Aqua Expeditions
215 Calle Huallaga
Iquitos
Peru
Tel: 51 65 60 1053
info@aquaexpeditions.com
www.aquaexpeditions.com

Though they are hardy expedition vessels, the 12-suite M/V Aqua and 16-suite M/V Aria feel more like boutique hotels that just happen to float through the Amazon's isolated Pacaya Samiria Reserve. The requisite high-profile architect (Peru's Jordi Puig), high-thread-count linens, and high-end gift shop offerings are part of the package. Whether on one of the multiple naturalist-guided excursions or from your outsize bedroom window, you'll see pink dolphins, tree-clinging sloths, massive squadrons of birds and monkeys, and the occasional anaconda. All meals have a decidedly local flavor, thanks to executive chef Pedro Miguel Schiaffino. And as for local piracy issues, which you may have read about in 2009, the Peruvian government has since established patrol posts to safeguard against repeat incidents.—Abbie Kozolchyk

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
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Aranwa Sacred Valley
Urubamba Valley
Peru
Tel: 51 1434 1452
info@aranwahotels.com
www.aranwahotels.com

Peruvian chain Aranwa's first hotel is a dreamy Andean wonderland spread over a canal- and lake-filled compound beside the Vilcanota River, far from the clusters of resorts in the Sacred Valley. One hundred spacious rooms are sprinkled about the property in the carefully restored eighteenth-century hacienda, the resort's centerpiece, and several more modern buildings with minimalist decor. When taking a day off from Machu Picchu or valley tours, you'll find loads to do at the Aranwa: Stroll the orchid-filled glass pyramid, browse the art gallery or library, shop for alpaca scarves, soak in the infinity pool, watch a film in the private cinema, or take a treatment in the 25,000-square-foot spa, the region's largest. Personable staff are on hand to give lifts around the property in a fleet of eco-carts, or to entice an alpaca or peacock to pose for a photo op. Locally sourced ingredients are the norm here, and much of the fruit and herbs in the Peruvian Novo Andina restaurant are grown right in the resort's hummingbird-filled gardens.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
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Casa Andina Classic, Cuzco Catedral
149 Santa Catalina Angosta
Cuzco
Peru
Tel: 866 220 4434
travel@casa-andina.com
www.casa-andina.com/peru/hotels/cusco-hotels/classic-cusco-catedral/hotel.php

Housed in a colonial building—with an exposed Inca stone wall in the lobby—this hotel is around the corner from Cuzco's historic center. Decorated with dark woods and bright textiles, the 43 guest rooms are basic but comfortable, and several look onto the city's famed cobblestones and cupolas. But the best seat in the house—actually, a whole batch of them—can be found at the tables of the top-floor breakfast room. Views skim the neighboring tiled rooftops and open up to Plaza de Armas and the hotel's namesake cathedral.—Abbie Kozolchyk

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
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Casa Andina Private Collection Valle Sagrado
5 Paradero Yanahuara
Yanahuara Village
Peru
Tel: 866 447 3270 (from U.S. only)
Tel: 51 84 976 5501
sales@casa-andina.com
www.casa-andina.com/peru/hotels/valle-sagrado-hotels/private-collection-valle-sagrado/hotel.php

Its grounds are lush, its restaurant and spa offerings local and delectable, and its access to the Sacred Valley's highlights ideal. But what really distinguishes this 85-room oasis is the planetarium-observatory, complete with resident astronomer. Not that you'll want for terrestrial pursuits here: Hiking, horseback riding, and mountain biking are all close at hand. Room decor is kept simple but stylish, with whitewashed stone walls, beamed ceilings, and hardwood floors. There's also cable TV, but with breathtaking views of the Andes from every room, there's little reason to switch it on.—Abbie Kozolchyk

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
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Casa Cartagena
336 Pumacurco
Centro Histórico
Cuzco
Peru
Tel: 51 8426 1171
info@casacartagena.com
www.casacartagena.com

A blending of contemporary design and a historic foundation sets this 16-suite mansion in the artsy San Blas district apart from the grand colonial hotels like the Monasterio a few doors down. A grass courtyard, anchored by a glowing sphere, is the heart of the seventeenth-century property built for the Encomendador of Cusco, Don Fernando de Cartagena y Santa Cruz. At points it's flashy and the furniture looks straight out of Milan (the hotel owners are Italian), but original Incan stone walls and Andes-themed photos from brilliant Peruvian photographer Morfi Jiménez Mercado maintain the Peruvian sense of place. As with the best of the increasingly luxe hotels in Cusco, there are posh extras, here in the form of piped-in oxygen (to combat altitude sickness), walk-in showers, and personal laptops. The attentive staff will serve impromptu pisco cocktails or treats from the restaurant, a renovation of La Chola, a simple but legendary Cuzqueña picanteria that now slings out trendy Andean and international plates. After a day touring the ruins, the tri-level Qoya spa, the most complete in the city, will help you catch your breath.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
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El MaPi by Inkaterra
109 Pachacutec Avenue
Aguas Calientes
Peru
Tel: 51 84 211 011
sales@byinkaterragroup.com
www.elmapihotel.com

In a town best known for backpacker joints, 2010 saw the arrival of a 48-room boutique hotel—complete with signature welcome drink (lemongrass lemonade), turndown service (a revolving assortment of Peruvian fruits), and free Wi-Fi throughout. Though its glass- and granite-intensive aesthetic is polished and modern, MaPi—short for Machu Picchu—retains a decidedly local and organic feel, from the quinoa tabouli at the restaurant to the hot-spring water in the property's bathing "pond." You'll likely spend your days elsewhere (say, at those namesake Incan ruins), but the resident El Bar is the perfect evening retreat, with its happy hour pisco creations and organic wines.—Abbie Kozolchyk

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
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Hotel Monasterio
136 Calle Palacios
Cuzco
Peru
Tel: 51 84 24 1777
info@peruorientexpress.com.pe
www.monasterio.orient-express.com/web/ocus/ocus_a2a_home.jsp

Born as the 16th-century seminary of San Antonio Abad (itself built on the site of a former Inca palace), the Monasterio is one of Peru's most gorgeous hotels. Because the original architecture has been largely preserved, no two of the 127 guestrooms are alike. They range in size from the monastic (these were monks' cells, after all) to the presidential, in the form of sprawling suites. But each is well-appointed, blending modern facilities with Spanish colonial (heavy wooden shutters that swing open to reveal the city's copious supply of cupolas). Most rooms can be oxygen-enriched for a small surcharge, to help low-altitude-dwelling lungs (you're at 11,600 feet here). Another comfort enhancer to consider: Any of the soaks on offer from the resident Bath Butler. One good choice is the Qeros Bath, which comes with a glass of coca sour, a Peruvian cigar, scented candles, and antistress bath salts.—Abbie Kozolchyk

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hotel Paracas
Avenida Paracas
Paracas
Peru
Tel: 877 778 2281 (toll-free)
Tel: 51 56 581333
Fax: 51 56 581778
www.libertador.com.pe

Amid the ruins of the iconic Hotel Paracas that crumbled during an August 2007 earthquake, famed Peruvian architect Bernardo Fort-Brescia designed this new 121-room resort (part of Starwood's Luxury Collection) in the coastal desert three hours south of Lima. Two-story white bungalows whose design incorporates some $2 million of bamboo blend into the dune-filled horizon, contrasting the deep-blue waters of the Paracas National Marine Reserve. There's an earthy feel to the accommodations, with textiles modeled after pre-Columbian designs, wood floors, walls covered in bamboo, and patios that look out onto the Pacific. While the bay is better for windsurfing, the daybeds at the glitzy pool scenes, where roving waiters fetch a steady supply of passion fruit sours and seviche, have become the new it spot for Lima's well-to-do. The hotel makes a restful base for a slew of nearby adventures—you can do scenic flights of the Nazca desert geoglyphs in its private jet, yacht rides to spot sea lions and Humboldt penguins on the Islas Ballestas, and pisco tastings at the Viñas de Oro distillery right at the resort.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hotel Rio Sagrado
Km. 75.8, Carretera Cuzco
Urubamba
Peru
Tel: 51 84 201 631
reservations.riosagrado@orient-express.com
www.riosagrado.com/web/ouru/rio_sagrado_hotel.jsp

Bought and refurbished by Orient-Express in 2010, Hotel Rio Sagrado occupies a particularly lush stretch of the Urubamba River. The 21 suites—meant to evoke a local village—place you close to much of what you'll want to see in the Sacred Valley (note that the Maras-Moray-Salineras horseback excursion takes you to some of the most gorgeous sights, from circular Incan agricultural terraces to cascading, mountainside salt pans). But staying put is tempting, not least in the bathroom: If the surrounding mountains, river, and gardens were a sports arena, the skybox would be your glass-enclosed shower. Even harder to leave is your view-exploiting bed, a cushy blend of 380-thread cotton linens and colorfully crewelworked woolen throw pillows. Other on-site temptations include the riverside restaurant and bar and the Mayu Wilka spa, both of which use local herbs, such as minty muña, to great effect.—Abbie Kozolchyk

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Inkaterra Machu Picchu
Aguas Calientes
Peru
Tel: 800 442 5042
Tel: 51 84 211 122
sales@inkaterra.com
www.inkaterra.com/en/machu-picchu

Formerly (and still best) known as the Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel, these 85 eco-luxe lodgings include whitewashed casitas and a butler-attended, terraced villa, all with terra-cotta floors, beamed ceilings, and colorful alpaca blankets. While the villa's private gardens, marble bathrooms, and open-air showers strengthen the case for booking this option, the best part of the hotel—no matter where you sleep—is what's outside: 12 acres of misty forest, 160-plus species of bird, endless butterflies, and one of the world's most extensive orchid collections. Though the ruins of Machu Picchu are clearly the main draw (a day's hike or 30-minute bus ride away), the neighborhood's other Incan superstars merit a visit (Wiñay Wayna is particularly gorgeous), as does the hotel's Unu spa. The Andean fusion food at Café Inkaterra is served with Vilcanota River views, but in the unlikely event that you need a change of scenery, take the quick, if rocky, walk to the restaurant- and bar-lined main drag of Aguas Calientes.—Abbie Kozolchyk

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Inkaterra Reserva Amazonica
Madre de Dios River
Tambopata National Reserve
Peru
Tel: 800 442 5042 (from U.S. only)
sales@inkaterra.com
www.inkaterra.com/en/reserva-amazonica

While jungle settings aren't traditionally synonymous with creature comforts, Reserva Amazonica is a notable exception. Located near the Tambopata National Reserve in the Amazon's Madre de Dios region, the lodge offers as much eco (canopy tours, birding excursions, native farming demonstrations) as resort (plunge pools, spa treatments, tropical drinks). To reach this private reserve and its 30 thatch-roof, lantern-lit, hammock-slung cabanas, fly into Puerto Maldonado, then take a one-hour boat ride on the Madre de Dios River.—Updated by Abbie Kozolchyk

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
JW Marriott Hotel Lima
615 Malecon De La Reserva
Lima
Peru 18
Tel: 51 1 217 7000
Tel: 51 1 217 7171
Fax: 51 1 217 7100
www.jwmarriottlima.com

This "quite modern and stylish" glass tower sits above rocky beaches. Lemon-tinted rooms and beds with gold duvets "provide a more-than-million-dollar view" of the Pacific and "death-defying paragliders." La Vista's "traditional dishes are prepared with elegance." Staff "really work at being helpful."

(300 rooms)

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
La Casona Inkaterra
113 Plaza Nazarenas
Cuzco
Peru
Tel: 800 442 5042 (toll-free)
inkaterra.com/en/cusco

This sprightly newcomer might well steal the spotlight from the Hotel Monasterio, long the top luxury option in Macchu Picchu's gateway town. Cusco's architectural heritage of Incan stone walls topped with colonial white stucco is echoed in this sixteenth-century building on a square steps from the main plaza. With just 11 suites, La Casona has the intimacy of a private home, and the building's colonial charms come with smart modern touches such as iPod speakers. Inside, a grassy courtyard is surrounded by rooms on two levels. Owners Denise and Joe Koechlin have fussed over every antique- and craft-strewn square foot of the place, and exquisite pillars, retablos, and benches have been sourced from all over Peru. The excellent restaurant—don't leave without trying the quinoa pancakes—offers a good deal of Andean hospitality.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Las Casitas del Colca
Parque Curiña
Yanque , Arequipa
Peru
Tel: 51 1 610 8300
www.lascasitasdelcolca.com

No longer the sole preserve of backpackers and climbers, the Peruvian Andes have recently been crowned with luxurious retreats like this remote Orient-Express outpost in Colca Canyon, which is twice as deep as the Grand Canyon. It's tough to access (a three-hour drive from the nearest airport, in Arequipa) but worth the detour. While other area hotels are lavishly refurbished colonial villas, this one goes native. Twenty discrete chalets sit halfway up the canyon, sharing the altitude with soaring condors. Rooms, furnished in earthy colors with a pastoral polish, are supremely yet simply comfortable: a terra-cotta bowl of corn cobs, a vase of wild grasses, a panier of logs. Nights can be chilly at 9,800 feet above sea level, so you'll find wood-burning fireplaces, heated laja-stone floors, and piping-hot plunge pools on the private terraces. Staff slip a woolen hot water bottle between the bedsheets in the evening. Adventure here is the alpaca-soft sort, with eager-to-please local guides, support vehicles (carrying oxygen), and gourmet picnic meals. Or just look up and wish upon a shooting star in the gin-clear southern sky. The remote setting ensures glimpses of traditional Quechuan life, with the men embroidering and the women working the land, and the organic garden means fresh ingredients for local dishes like quinoa soup, stuffed peppers, and grilled guinea pig.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Libertador Puno
Isla Esteves S/N
Puno
Peru
Tel: 51 51 36 7780
info@libertador.com.pe
www.libertador.com.pe/en/2/1/6/puno-hotel

Commanding the most enviable position of all the lodgings in Puno, the Libertador is the sole occupant of a little peninsula that juts out into Lake Titicaca. The 123-room hotel is also the poshest in town, with gastronomic offerings that arguably merit a trip in themselves (start in the bar with coca sours and piqueos by the fire, then move on to the Novo Andean specialties, such as quinoa risotto, at the restaurant). Only one aspect of the property doesn't fit the luxe picture: Sound carries rather easily between guest rooms—though, oddly, the same holds true of many Puno hotels. What the Libertador's walls lack in thickness, however, they make up for in window space. There are amazing views of the lake, particularly at sunrise and sunset. During the day, you have easy access to Titicaca's greatest hits (from the floating Uros Islands to the beautifully terraced Taquile Island) as well as to Puno's city center.—Abbie Kozolchyk

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
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Machu Picchu Sanctuary Lodge
Monumento Arqueologico de Machu Picchu
Machu Picchu
Peru
Tel: 800 524 2420
Tel: 51 8421 1039
reserves@peruorientexpress.com.pe
machupicchu.orient-express.com/web/omac/omac_a2a_home.jsp

Once a rustic, state-run establishment, the 31-room Sanctuary Lodge was leased by Orient-Express in 1999 and transformed into a luxury eco-resort where organic Andean dishes are served on fine china and high tea is taken in native gardens. But tangible luxuries are secondary here: As the lone hotel permitted to operate alongside Machu Picchu, the Sanctuary Lodge lets you roll out of bed and beat the crowds to the ruins. For a taste of what awaits, request a room with a view of Huayna Picchu (the tallest local peak in any given shot of Machu Picchu)—though the jungle and garden outlooks are lovely, too. Quarters are admittedly close; the government architects had an obvious antisprawl mandate. So the simple interiors—all light linens and dark woods—work well. Reserve a year in advance if you're traveling during the dry season (April through October), and six months in advance the rest of the year.—Abbie Kozolchyk

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Mancora Marina Hotel
Panamericana Norte, Km 1215
Máncora Chico
Peru
Tel: 51 73 258614
informes@mancoramarina.com
mancoramarina.com

In Peru's far north, the Pacific coast retreat town of Máncora is quickly carving out a name as the country's premier beach and surf destination. Among the increasingly fashionable small hotels that have opened here, the Mancora Marina—on the road to Las Pocitas, one the area's best beaches—was designed by Jordi Puig (who also did the MV Aqua Amazon riverboat). The 12-room hotel, its focal point a three-story bar with steps leading down to the infinity pool, seems like something out of Milan rather than the area's more typical bamboo bungalows. The bartender will be there at check-in with your welcome cocktail (request a passion fruit sour or a mango daiquiri). Rooms have stark-white walls and furnishings as well as a sexy glass shower that stares into the main room.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Miraflores Park Hotel
1035 Avenue Malecón de la Reserva
Lima
Peru 18
Tel: 51 1 242 3425
Fax: 51 1 242 3393
mirapark@peruorientexpress.com.pe
www.mira-park.com/web/olim/olim_a2a_home.jsp

Presiding over a quiet stretch of the Malecón (jetty) de la Reserva, Miraflores Park has some of the city's best seascapes—particularly from the rooftop pool and Observatory restaurant. Given this positioning, many of the hotel's 81 rooms and suites (all spacious and well equipped for business travelers) come with a bonus: Periodic paragliding fly-bys on view from your room. For additional destressing, head to the resident Zest spa. The lobby-side Poissonerie restaurant dishes up fresh, creative Peruvian-European cuisine.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
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Mountain Lodges of Peru's Machu Picchu Lodge to Lodge
Inca Trail
Machu Picchu
Tel: 51 1 421 6952 (Lima office)
Tel: 51 84 236 069 (Cuzco office)
info@mountainlodgesofperu.com
www.mountainlodgesofperu.com

The comfort seeker's alternative to the tents and sleeping bags of the standard Inca Trail, the four lodges that make up this trekking circuit allow weary bodies to recuperate nightly with hot tubs, down bedding, and (upon request) a massage therapist's hands. The lodges are scattered along the Salkantay route (higher and longer than the usual trek, this trail requires serious training), with views of the beautiful Salkantay peak.—Abbie Kozolchyk

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Tambo del Inka Resort and Spa
Avenida Ferrocarril S/N
Urubamba
Peru
Tel: 51 84 581 777
reservastambodelinka@libertador.com.pe
www.starwoodhotels.com/luxury/property/overview/index.html?propertyID=3285

A LEED-certified study in glass, stone, and wood alongside the Vilcanota River, the 128-room Tambo del Inka opened in 2010. Go on the property's Quinoa Trail, a day that begins with quinoa pancakes, includes kayak and bike rides through quinoa-intensive landscapes, and concludes with a quinoa facial back at the spa. Not that you couldn't spend an entire day in the hotel's two-pool, 12 treatment–room sybaritic centerpiece, where the views of the Andes rival the services. And the nearby Urubamba train, which also opened in 2010, provides easy access to sensory stimulation of an altogether different kind: a day trip to Machu Picchu. Though leaving the ruins is always tough, the hotel room that awaits—all cushy linens, muted textiles, and arboreal surroundings—serves as ample consolation.—Abbie Kozolchyk

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.