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Rhodes See And Do

Acropolis of Rhodes
Rhodes Town , Rhodes
Greece

The Hellenistic acropolis, built during the fourth century B.C., overlooks both the New and Old Towns from its perch atop Mount Smith. The site contains the ruins of several ancient buildings. The small reconstructed theater was probably used for events associated with the cult of Apollo; the stadium below still hosts occasional performances of classical tragedies. The three restored columns of the Temple of Apollo, a landmark for ships at sea, sit on a platform above the retaining wall behind the theater. To the north, the foundations of a temple to Zeus and to Athena Polias have been revealed. Visit in the late afternoon to see the ruins bathed by the setting sun.

Lindos
Lindos , Rhodes
Greece

The village that launched a thousand postcards has streets filled with elaborate villas—"captain's houses" that were built by merchant ship owners between the 16th and 18th centuries (many with courtyards of lovely pebble mosaic). In the 1960s and '70s, artists, writers, and rock musicians gravitated here to soak up the sun and swig retsina; David Gilmour of Pink Floyd still has a house here. Lindos also has an acropolis, one of three original Dorian acropoleis on Rhodes, containing the ruined Sanctuary of Athena Lindia, with its large Doric portico from the fourth century B.C.

New Town
Rhodes Town , Rhodes
Greece

The New Town dates to the 16th-century Ottoman occupation, when Greek Orthodox natives, forbidden to dwell in the Old Town, had to settle outside it. The Murad Reis Mosque and Muslim cemetery, just south of Elli Beach, are worth a look. Writer Lawrence Durrell lived in the dilapidated Villa Cleobolus, bordering on the graveyard. (He later recorded his two years on Rhodes in his florid prose in Reflections on a Marine Venus. ) As for New Town beaches, many are reachable only via the hotels next to them; public Elli Beach, however, has fine sand and pedal boats for rent.

Old Town
Rhodes Town , Rhodes
Greece

This maze of lanes is the oldest inhabited medieval city in Europe. The Knights of St. John, a military religious order organized in Jerusalem to care for Christian pilgrims, used it as their power base in medieval times. Ippoton, the "Street of the Knights," is a long cobbled lane lined with inns, a separate one for Knights from each country. Rhodes was the warriors' last defense against the Ottoman Turks, but in 1522, they were crushed by Süleyman the Magnificent and his army of 100,000. The mosque built shortly after his victory stands at the top of Sokratous Street.

Petaloudes
Petaloudes , Rhodes
Greece
Tel: 30 22 4108 1801

From mid-June through September, millions of zebra-striped "butterflies" (actually Jersey tiger moths) congregate in this lovely green ravine. Covering every stone and tree, the insects are invisible until they move, revealing their red underbellies. Unfortunately, tourists come swarming after them, with flashing cameras, blaring radios, and crying babies, so an early-morning visit is advisable if you want to fully enjoy this splendid spectacle. Petaloudes ("Butterfly Valley") is 15.5 miles south of Rhodes. Open from 8 a.m.–4 p.m. (extended hours during high season).

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.