PRINT PREVIEW
send to printer

Concierge.com

Rome Hotels

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Albergo del Sole al Pantheon
63 Piazza della Rotonda
Rome
Italy
Tel: 39 06 678 0441
info@hotelsolealpantheon.com
www.hotelsolealpantheon.com

Few hotels have guest lists that stretch back to the Renaissance. But the Sole is one of the oldest in Europe: It had already been going for almost half a century (under its previous name, the Locanda del Montone) when racy rhymer Ludovico Ariosto put up here in 1513. Today it's a pleasant, efficiently run four-star, though the desk staff can be a little cold. A room on the piazza comes at a premium, but it's worth the price: The side view across to the Pantheon really is extraordinary (ask for a third-floor room if you're worried about noise from the piazza below). The decor is classic, with brocade covers on the somewhat mushy beds and reproductions of Old Master paintings and prints on the walls; there are hot tubs (some of them decidedly petite) in all rooms. A good buffet breakfast is served—in a pretty inner courtyard in summer. Rack rates are a little steep for what you get, so keep an eye on the special offers posted on the Web site.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Aleph
15 Via di San Basilio
Rome
Italy
Tel: 39 06 422 901
reservation@aleph.boscolo.com
www.aleph.boscolohotels.com

Not for the fainthearted, this pricey luxury option not far from the Via Veneto has all the decadent verve that we have come to expect from an Adam Tihany interior. The Israeli-American architect's heaven-and-hell theme segues from an infernal blood-red lobby to a celestial basement spa, with a chill-out room concealed behind the massive caveau door of this former bank's high-security vault. The funky rooms (in Purgatory, natch) are dominated by huge black-and-white photos of the Eternal City; it's best to push the budget here, as the classic doubles can be a little cramped. As can sometimes be the case with boutique hotels, service leans toward pretty rather than competent. The rooftop bar-restaurant is a good aperitivo refuge.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Casa Howard
18 Via Capo le Case
149 Via Sistina
Rome
Italy
Tel: 39 06 6992 4555
info@casahoward.it
www.casahoward.com

If you don't happen to have stylish Roman friends who can put you up in their apartment, Casa Howard is the next best thing. This tasteful, upmarket B&B has two locations, both near the Spanish Steps, and each room has a theme—everything from Chinese to flowers—with wallpaper and furniture to match. The Via Capo le Case location is more feminine; go for the Pink Room here, for its en suite bathroom and larger size. The more design-y Via Sistina branch (opt for the Zebra suite) was designed by Tommaso Ziffer, the architect behind the far pricier Hotel de Russie. All of Via Sistina's rooms have Wi-Fi and en suite bathrooms. Most rooms are tiny, but we love the breakfasts of fresh cornetti and honey from Tuscany, and the hammam bathrooms (there's one for your steaming pleasure at each property). Book early, though: The secret's out (149 Via Sistina).

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Casa Montani
9 Piazzale Flaminio
Piazza del Popolo
Rome
Italy 00196
Tel: 39 06 3260 0421
info@casamontani.com
www.casamontani.com

A five-room bed-and-breakfast with the soul of a much bigger design hotel, Casa Montani has become a solid word-of-mouth success since its November 2007 opening. Located just outside Piazza del Popolo, a ten-minute walk from the Spanish Steps, the third-floor guest house was once a typical Roman apartment, but it was given a stylish makeover by architect Liliana Sciacca. While no expense has been spared, it's not the Designers Guild fabrics, Shantung silk curtains, nor bathrooms in Ligurian slate or local travertine that seal the deal so much as the sheer urban elegance of the place. The only communal area is a small library-lounge, and the rooms have little view to speak of—with the exception of the suite, which has a ringside view of Piazza del Popolo and the twin bell towers of Trinità dei Monti beyond. But Casa Montani's intimate interiors make this a good place for cocooning after a hard day's sightseeing (the Flaminio metro stop is just outside), and the fact that breakfast is served in your room contributes to the cozy atmosphere.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Daphne Inn
Daphne Veneto, 55 Via di San Basilico
Daphne Trevi, 20 Via degli Avignonesi
Rome
Italy
Tel: 39 06 4782 3529
Tel: 39 06 4544 9177
info@daphne-rome.com
www.daphne-rome.com

The Daphne is part of a new generation of stylish B&Bs in Rome. Like Casa Howard, it is spread over two locations, both near Piazza Barberini. The rooms are simple but tasteful, with ethnic-modern decor; of the two branches, the Daphne Veneto has the edge, with its elevator (note that you'll need to climb stairs to the Daphne Trevi) and en suite bathrooms (55 Via di San Basilico). Guests consistently rave about the enthusiastic staff, who recommend restaurants and walking tours. Free amenities include Wi-Fi and use of a cell phone during your stay—for contacting the owner outside of staff hours, or for receiving calls from friends and family. For this price, the service and accommodations are unparalleled. Note that neither location allows smoking.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Donna Camilla Savelli Hotel
27 Via Garibaldi
Rome
Italy 00153
Tel: 39 06 588 861
www.hotelsavelli.com

This restored seventeenth-century convent in Trastevere was designed by one of the great Baroque architects, Francesco Borromini, and has all the play of convex and concave shapes for which the architect is celebrated: soaring archways decorated in bas-relief in the bar area and a refectory complete with a lofty coffered ceiling, dark boiserie, and a pulpit where matins were read. The 78 rooms are soberly done (although the beds are sumptuous), with many of the convent's antiques and Baroque architectural flourishes. The garden cloister, with its magnolia tree, camellias, jasmine, rooftop terrace, and smaller Cloister of the Angel, provides outdoor space where guests can enjoy the monastic tranquillity. What saves the property from too much gravitas is the hospitality of the exceptional staff.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Fontanella Borghese
84 Largo Fontanella Borghese
Rome
Italy
Tel: 39 06 6880 9504
fontborghese@mclink.it
www.fontanellaborghese.com

Fontanella Borghese is a striking exception to Rome's slew of disappointing mid-price options. A welcoming 29-room gem in a palazzo that once belonged to the Borghese family, the hotel is just a sashay away from the Via Condotti fashion strip. The sober antique decor is offset by cut flowers, potted plants, and cheerful fabrics. A recent expansion into the apartment next door has given the hotel a decent-sized breakfast room and freed up a charming little lounge. Factor in the friendly and knowledgeable service, and you begin to understand why this place is usually full both in and out of season. The Fontanella's sister hotel, Due Torri, located nearby, is a good alternative.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Fortyseven
47 Via Petroselli
Rome
Tel: 39 06 678 7816
contact@fortysevenhotel.com
www.fortysevenhotel.com

Near the Forum and Circus Maximus, this "modern hotel dedicates each of its five levels to a different Italian artist of the twentieth century, such as Umberto Mastroianni or Emilio Greco. Rooms have parquet floors; suites come with Nespresso coffee machines and "terraces with fantastic views." Circus Roof Garden dishes up Mediterranean cuisine, but it's "incredibly overpriced and the service isn't great."

(61 rooms)

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Gladiatori Palazzo Manfredi
125 Via Labicana
Colosseum
Rome
Italy 00184
Tel: 39 06 7759 1380
info@hotelpalazzomanfredi.it
www.hotelgladiatori.it

This pretty pink palazzo, with its foundations in the Ludus Magnus (ancient Rome's gladiator training school), is about as close as you can sleep to the Colosseum. In fact, deluxe rooms have an unimpeded view of that iconic monument. More prosaically speaking, this 16-room five-star endears itself to travelers who prize a central location and boutique comforts (coffee-makers, a mini gym, in-room massages, and contemporary-classic decor) despite the thundering traffic (even soundproofed windows don't muffle it entirely). Five luxuriously appointed apartments, all with full hotel services but without the Colosseum view, allow groups of up to five travelers to opt for a self-catering stay. A big selling point is the view from the rooftop bar and restaurant, which is, quite simply, stunning.—Lee Marshall

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Grand Hotel Via Veneto
155 Via Veneto
Villa Borghese
Rome
Italy 00187
Tel: 39 06 487 881
reservations@ghvv.it
www.ghvv.it

This April 2009 addition to the glam offerings along Via Veneto—once home to the dolce vita but now the domain of the generous expense account—is suitably stylish. The striking Art Deco theme in the public spaces is offset by warm russet tones in the 122 plush bedrooms and suites. From front-desk staff oozing charm and efficiency to flawless service in the smart street-level bar/seafood café, you'll feel coddled throughout your stay. Carrara marble abounds in the large bathrooms; corner suites have delightful views through foliage to Via Veneto and a quieter side street. Up on the roof, with its spectacular view across the city, the solarium has a whirlpool tub from which to enjoy the spectacle.—Lee Marshall

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Campo de' Fiori
6 Via del Biscione
Campo de' Fiori
Rome
Italy 00186
Tel: 39 06 6880 6865
info@hotelcampodefiori.com
www.hotelcampodefiori.com

A recent refurbishment has turned this once rather kitsch and shabby three-star into a 23-room romantic boutique hotel, but the family touch is still present in the warm and willing service. The location—just around the corner from bustling Campo De' Fiori market and within easy reach of several good restaurants—and the reasonable rates make this property a good choice for travelers who'd rather splurge on food and wine than a posh hotel. Bedrooms are small but elegant, with chandeliers and Venetian-style antiques. To avoid being woken up by the sounds of drunken late-night revelers (market by day, Campo De' Fiori is Rome's late-bar hub by night), ask for a room at the back: Those on the top floor (like 601, with an outlook across to St. Peter's) are the ones to net. The small roof terrace offers yet more unbeatable views. The hotel also has a number of family-size apartments in the surrounding area, which can be booked for longer stays.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hotel de Russie
9 Via del Babuino
Rome
Italy
Tel: 39 06 328 881
reservations.derussie@roccofortecollection.com
www.hotelderussie.it

When the historic De Russie reopened in 2000 after extensive renovations, it was the first in a new generation of Roman hotels, a neoclassical landmark with refreshing, Deco-tinged contemporary design, courtesy of Rocco Forte's sister Olga Polizzi and Italian architect Tommaso Ziffer. Rooms mix Robert Mapplethorpe flower photos with crisp white chaise longues; the best have long, thin terraces that overlook the rooftops of nearby Via Margutta. Right off Piazza del Popolo, the 125-room property's real trump card is its magnificent garden, which rises up the slopes of the Pincio hill on a series of palm-shaded and statue-strewn terraces, home to a butterfly sanctuary. The elegant Stravinskij Bar (martinis are a specialty) moves outside in summer, complete with cheesy pianist. Owen Wilson, George Clooney, and Julia Roberts are among the stars who have chosen the De Russie, but be warned: Rates are punishing, rooms for mere mortals are often on the small side, and service can go into meltdown at peak times.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hotel Eden
49 Via Ludovisi
Rome
Italy
Tel: 39 06 478 121
reservations@hotel-eden.it
www.hotel-eden.it/index_e.html

The stately Eden is close enough to the Spanish Steps to be central, but because it's tucked away on a quiet street, it retains a tranquil feel—just what you'll need after a day spent fighting the crowds. If you can afford it, angle for one of the fifth-floor deluxe doubles, whose small balconies overlook the gardens of the Villa Medici and a large swath of the centro storico. The room decor is classically elegant without being musty, the service is close to impeccable (make use of the excellent concierge), and La Terrazza dell' Eden, the hotel's restaurant and bar, has some of the best views in Rome. Federico Fellini held court here back in the day, and just like his beloved Via Veneto, the Eden has seen renewed favor of late. A 2006 change of ownership (from the Forte Group to Starwood's luxurious Meridien brand) has left the refined atmosphere and services as good as ever.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hotel Hassler
6 Piazza Trinita dei Monti
Rome
Italy
Tel: 39 06 699 340
info@hotelhassler.it
www.hotelhasslerroma.com

Perched at the top of the Spanish Steps, the classic Hassler has spectacular views and—with more gold and brocade than a Palm Beach dowager—a timeless, stately elegance. Bigger rooms come with ornate moldings and ceiling frescoes, and a family-owned atmosphere still prevails. To make sure you get your money's worth, ask for a city-side view. The Hassler also has a restaurant worthy of the hotel's august reputation: stylish rooftop perch Imago, helmed by talented young chef Francesco Apreda. Oenophiles should consider staying at the adjacent Il Palazzetto: four intimate suites above a wine school, restaurant, and bar that are run by the hotel (39-06-699-0878; www.wineacademyroma.com).

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hotel Locarno
22 Via della Penna
Rome
Italy
Tel: 06 361 0841
info@hotellocarno.com
www.hotellocarno.com

If you book into this art deco landmark, make sure to reserve in the new wing of the hotel. If you stay on the chintzy older side, you won't enjoy the property and in fact may feel that you are in a sad film noir: rooms are worn and have a melancholy air (though a refurbishment is scheduled for 2011). The ones in the newer wing on the other hand are outfitted in stylish silks and have gorgeous wood floors. And deluxe rooms have sumptuous 1920s marble bathrooms. For timeless ambience, the rooftop bar can't be beat.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Inn at the Roman Forum
30 Via Degli Ibernesi
Rome
Italy 00184
Tel: 39 06 6919 0970
theinnattheromanforum.com

A foliage-draped door on a pedestrian alley reminiscent of a Tuscan village opens into one of Rome's most attractive new designer-boutique offerings. The Forum's 12 bedrooms have cascading brocades around four-poster beds, and marble cladding in bathrooms supplied with luxurious toiletries. You'll eat breakfast on a fourth-floor terrace with a heart-stopping view across the Roman Forum. Behind the terrace, two gorgeous rooms back onto a little high-walled garden; book them together as a suite to have your own private hideaway. A recently excavated cryptoporticus in the cellar gives the place an exclusive, ancient feel. The Forum location is the latest addition to a stable of hotels that includes the Inn at the Spanish Steps on chic Via Condotti and its four-room ultraluxe annex, View at the Spanish Steps.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Inn at the Spanish Steps
85 Via dei Condotti
Rome
Italy
Tel: 39 06 6992 5657
atspanishstep@tin.it
www.atspanishsteps.com

The only hotel with an entrance on Via Condotti, Rome's fashion strip, the Inn at the Spanish Steps is a luxury boutique hotel with a fabulous roof garden, where breakfast is served when weather permits (which in Rome is most of the year) and where a free aperitivo spread is laid out between 6 and 9 p.m. The antique style of the rooms—with their oil paintings, polished parquet floors, and (in some rooms) exposed wooden beams and stone fireplaces—is a throwback to the days of literary travelers like Hans Christian Andersen, who briefly lived in this palazzo. In 2004 the Inn opened a four-room ultraluxe annex, the View at the Spanish Steps, on the top floor of an adjacent building; it provides just what the name suggests: the ultimate angle on one of the Eternal City's most famous landmarks. The style here is more classic-Moderne, with ebony floorboards and safari-striped armchairs. A third member of the family, the Inn at the Roman Forum, opened in June 2006.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Portrait Suites
Via Bocca di Leone 23
Rome
Italy
Tel: 39 06 6938 0742
www.lungarnohotels.com

In Milan and Florence, fashion designers long ago extended their operations into the hotel sector. Rome, on the other hand, had to wait until 2006 to get its first fashion hotel, courtesy of Salvatore Ferragamo. Located above the flagship store on chic Via Condotti, the design house and architect Michele Bonan modeled Portrait Suites on a London gentleman's club. Vintage fashion photos and sketches from the company archive line the walls of public spaces. In the rooms, a soothing neutral color scheme is interrupted by dashes of lime and pink, and curtains are subtly decorated with the Ferragamo logo. If you tire of the gourmet eating options in the surrounding centro storico, you can cook in your private kitchen, complete with dishwasher. The roof terrace, where breakfast is served in good weather, followed by apertivi in the evening, has spectacular views over the neighborhood.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Radisson Blu es. Hotel Rome
171 Via Filippo Turati
Rome
Italy 00185
Tel: 39 06 444 841
Tel: 800 333 3333 (toll-free)
info.rome@radissonsas.com
www.radissonblu.com/eshotel-rome

When it opened in 2003, this 273-room glass tower was the city's most radical hotel design statement. After becoming part of the Radisson group, room rates dropped and reviews remained mainly positive, even though the relentless design approach is beginning to show its age. Reception and concierge desks are housed in cool white pods, most standard rooms have the bed and shower on the same wooden platform, and much of the furniture is custom-made by Cappellini. Fashionistas still love it, and the hotel's Zest Bar attracts plenty of hip Romans. The large rooftop pool (open June–September) and little touches like free Wi-Fi access give the Radisson a decided edge. However, its location—handy for Rome's main Termini train station but in the rather sleazy Esquilino neighborhood—won't please everyone. Grand Tour types should steer clear, but for those who want a taste of la città moderna, complete with a ringside view of the tracks, the Radisson is still a hot ticket.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Rome Cavalieri
101 Via Alberto Cadlolo
Monte Mario
Rome
Italy 00136
Tel: 800 445 8667 (toll-free)
Tel: 39 06 3509 1
reservations.rome@hilton.com
www.romecavalieri.com

Recently dropping "Hilton" from its name as part of its Waldorf-Astoria Collection rebranding, this 1960s classic on lofty Monte Mario may be a fair hike from the sights (a 20-minute taxi ride to the Vatican, for instance), but there's regular shuttle-bus service, and the payback is the amazing view over the centro storico—plus the city's largest hotel pool, attached to a huge spa and fitness center. The 370 rooms are lushly decorated, all with balconies, and even the standard Deluxe doubles feel spacious. But for the full luxury experience, check into one of the 25 suites, or any of the Imperial Rooms on the top two floors; the latter feature more opulent decor, choicer fabrics, a dedicated Imperial Club bar and breakfast room, and even a separate elevator, which whisks guests straight up past the plebs—and as you'd expect, the penthouse is pretty spectacular, too, with some of the best views in the city. The owner, Angelo Guido Terruzzi, is an art collector, and many of his purchases are scattered around the hotel. They include a cycle of paintings by Tiepolo in the lobby, for which Terruzzi paid $8 million in May 2006. The eighth floor hosts La Pergola restaurant, fiefdom of German super-chef Heinz Beck.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
St. George
Via Giulia, 62
Rome
Italy
Tel: 39 06 686611
stgeorgehotel.it

The St. George shines as much for its charm as for its perfect location on the elegant Via Giulia. Pope Julius II commissioned Bramante to design a tribunal on this very spot, and rough travertine blocks still jut out from the restored facade, but the interior is sleek modernism mixed with serene classicism. The entrance has a comfortable library and two enormous sofas flanking a modern fireplace. On the other side of the open ground floor, a wine bar, the restaurant I Sofà di Via Giulia (which serves elaborate, overpriced food), and a cigar bar flow around a skylit atrium. A typical guest room has walls of the palest gray, blond parquet floors, floor-to-ceiling windows framed in travertine, and a bathroom stocked with good hand cream and lip balm. Later this year, a spacious rooftop terrace will open, as will a basement spa with a tiny gym and a Turkish bath.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Teatro Pace
33 Via del Teatro Pace
Rome
Italy
Tel: 39 06 687 9075
info@hotelteatropace.com
www.hotelteatropace.com

Location, location, and location are what make this boutique hotel such a good value—plus a delicious Baroque spiral staircase, designed by a pupil of Bernini, which more than makes up for the lack of an elevator. Just around the corner from Piazza Navona, this former cardinal's residence offers 23 high-ceilinged rooms with original beams. The decor is on the plain side, but the damask curtains and bedcovers and the antique writing desks are pleasant enough, and all the usual three-star accessories (AC, TV, Wi-Fi) are provided. There are no communal spaces, so a generous continental breakfast is served in your room.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Villa Laetitia
22/23 Lungoteverde delle Armi
Rome
Italy
Tel: 39 06 322 6776
info@villalaetitia.com
www.villalaetitia.com

Anna Fendi (of the Fendi fashion empire) acquired a fabulous Art Nouveau mansion along the Tiber River with a foresteria, or guest villa, behind it, and has transformed the latter into Villa Laetitia, a 15-room hotel. (There are plans to open seven suites in the main mansion.) Set far back from the street in the meandering gardens and eclectically decorated by Anna and two of her daughters, the compact rooms mix modernism with design pieces from the '30s and '40s, ranging from Hoffman-style woodwork to bold black-and-white checkerboard fabrics and antique tiles. Each has a kitchenette, and most have direct access to the garden. Ground-floor public rooms are beautifully restored, with faux marble pillars, ceiling flourishes of stucco angels, and intricate wrought iron balustrades on the grand marble staircase. There are flamboyant chandeliers on every level and glass archways in the Victorian conservatory at the back of the main mansion facing the garden. In keeping with the residential atmosphere, staff are friendly but few. Still, fashion mavens will love the style and the tranquil location, just a 15-minute walk from Piazza del Popolo.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Villa Spalletti Trivelli
Via Piacenza 4
Rome
Italy 00184
Tel: 39 06 4890 7934
www.villaspalletti.it/e

Italian aristos on Rome stopovers love Villa Spalletti Trivelli, and you can see why: It is every inch a home-away-from-palatial-home. Just across a leafy park from the Italian president's residence at the Quirinale Palace, the Villa is an imposing place of high ceilings, antiques, and artwork that have been in the Spalletti Trivelli family for generations, including an extensive collection of old maps. The 12 large, lofty rooms are individually decorated in rich colors, with Fiandra linens, fluffy monogrammed robes and slippers, 42-inch plasma TVs, and broadband access. Add to this four immense public rooms, a historic library, 24-hour reception and room service, a chef on hand to whip up candlelit dinners on request, and—new for 2007—a well-equipped spa offering Pilates, yoga, beauty treatments, and a hammam, and guests may be forgiven for never taking the short stroll from here to the Trevi Fountain or Roman Forum.

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.