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Shanghai Hotels

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Fairmont Peace Hotel
20 Nanjing Road E.
Shanghai
China 200002
Tel: 86 21 6321 6888
peacehotel@fairmont.com
www.fairmont.com/peacehotel

Reopened in 2010 after a three-year makeover, Shanghai's 80-year-old grande dame has been restored to its 1930s glory days, when it hosted the likes of Charlie Chaplin and Noël Coward. The 270-room Art Deco icon topped with a green copper dome sits at Shanghai's busiest intersection, where Nanjing Road meets the Bund. The dim, amber-lit lobby with heavy carved woods and deep-mottled marbles strikes a dramatic note in keeping with the hotel's august stature—although the guards at the door and hotel staff patrolling the lobby to stop visitors from posing for pictures takes the respect for the property a bit far. The decor lightens up in the guest rooms, which are decorated in soft gold and lilac and newly fitted with high-tech conveniences such as Wi-Fi, MP3 docks, and bath-side TVs. Among the six restaurants and bars, Dragon Phoenix offers Cantonese dining in a whimsical, Forbidden City-esque setting, and the Jazz Bar features nightly performances by the hotel's famous octogenarian jazz band. The Jasmine Lounge, in the lobby, is a popular spot for smart high teas. History buffs looking for remnants of the '30s should visit the Peace Hall, with its sprung maple dance floor and Lalique glass, and the Peace Museum, where longtime director Martin Ma (who has worked at the hotel for more than 40 years) will share lots of colorful stories and memorabilia.—Amy Fabris-Shi

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Four Seasons Hotel Shanghai
500 Weihai Lu
Shanghai
China 200041
Tel: 800 819 5053 (toll-free)
Tel: 86 21 6256 8888
reservations.shg@fourseasons.com
www.fourseasons.com/shanghai

This 37-story hotel is the first Four Seasons in mainland China, and is located between two major shopping streets, Nanjing and Huaihai in downtown Shanghai, not far from People's Square so you can punctuate shopping sprees with a bit of culture. Palm fronds and fountains decorate the lobby, the 439 rooms are spacious and airy (even the smaller ones are 420 sq. foot) with splashes of red, green and yellow, and while the indoor pool (open 6 a.m. to 11 p.m.) is on the small side, it's rarely crowded. Families are welcomed with kid-friendly menus in all four of the house restaurants, child-size bathrobes, and babysitting services.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Grand Hyatt Shanghai
Jin Mao Tower
88 Century Boulevard
Shanghai
China 200121
Tel: 86 21 5049 1234
info.ghshanghai@hyattintl.com
www.shanghai.grand.hyatt.com/hyatt/hotels/index.jsp

The Grand Hyatt Shanghai takes up the top 34 floors of the monolithic 88-story Jin Mao Tower—the fifth-tallest building in the world—so you can imagine the views: vertigo-inducing panoramas over the city's skyscrapers and streets, abetted by the ubiquitous floor-to-ceiling windows. (Request a west-facing room for views of the Bund, the Oriental Pearl Tower, and the rest of the Shanghai skyline's kitschy excess.) If you can tear your gaze from the neon spectacle outside, you'll find the hotel's interiors are pretty sumptuous: All 555 rooms have contemporary furniture (lots of glass, lacquered wood, and velvety neutral-toned upholstery) accented by traditional Eastern artwork. The marble baths have multiple-head "shower towers" that engulf you in water and mist; if these aren't enough of a full-body experience, you can head to the steam baths and hot tubs at the on-site spa. The hotel's dozen restaurants, bars, and clubs include the Patio, a 33-story atrium where you can listen to live jazz; Cloud 9, on the 87th floor, where the views will make you dizzier than any cocktail; and Club Jin Mao, where you can sample local specialties, such as deep-fried eel with honey soy sauce and braised bean curd with hairy crab roe. While the Pudong location is oriented more for business than pleasure, the Line 2 Metro station is just a five-minute walk away, and a horde of cheap cabs waits outside to whisk you across the Huangpu River to the Old City.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Indigo
585 Zhongshan Road E.
Shanghai
China 200010
Tel: 86 21 3302 9999
indigo.shanghai@ihg.com
www.shanghai.hotelindigo.com

Hotel Indigo in Shiliupu, south of the Bund, is perfectly placed beside the Huangpu River, with Yu Garden a stone's throw away. Indigo's 184 design-led rooms and public areas are decorated with Chinese art, porcelain, and bamboo, plus up-tempo imagery of local settings, such as the riverside and old city. It is popular with designers, architects, and artsy Chinese twentysomethings, plus travelers seeking a less generic stay than the Shanghai brand-hotel norm. The Char lounge's terrace on the 30th floor has excellent views of the skyline. Neat service touches include the Quay club lounge (not really a club at all, since all guests can use it), complete with iMacs, a library, and wicker pod seats. Both the gym and the seventh-floor infinity pool look directly over the river. In-room amenities include hardwood floors, complimentary Wi-Fi, large plasma TVs, and blue-and-white mosaic-tiled bathrooms, along with organic Ba Yan Ka La toiletries and locally sourced tea from nearby Hangzhou—Gary Bowerman

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hyatt on the Bund
199 Huang Pu Road
Shanghai
China 200080
Tel: 86 21 6393 1234
info.shang@hyattintl.com
www.shanghai.bund.hyatt.com/hyatt/hotels/index.jsp

Opened in late 2007, this twin-towered property doesn't get the 'Grand' title because there's already a Grand Hyatt nearby, however it's certainly of Grand Hyatt standard, but with a more contemporary deluxe style. Perched on the up-and-coming North Bund strip, overlooking the U-shaped bend in the Huangpu River, the hotel's visual positioning is one of its biggest selling points. The rooms, bars, and restaurants have panoramic views of old and new Shanghai, from the neoclassical Bund to the soaring Pudong skyline. The 631 guest rooms are equipped with floor-to-ceiling windows, rotating plasma TVs, iPod docks, DVD players, and glass-paneled bathrooms with rain forest showers. The Vue restaurant on the 30th and 31st floors serves modern takes on traditional European dishes and is designed like a modern residence with separate lounge, library, and kitchen areas—its roof deck offers Shanghai's premier cocktail-with-a-view setting. The centerpiece of Xindalu, another of the four restaurants, is a hand-built brick oven for preparing the restaurant's signature dish: roast Peking duck. The contemplative, water-themed Yuan Spa (Yuan means "source of the water") fuses Chinese and Asian wellness treatments in an elegant interior of blond wood and emerald-veined white marble.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Jia Shanghai
931 West Nanjing Road
Shanghai
China 200041
Tel: 86 21 6217 9000
rez@jiashanghai.com
www.jiashanghai.com/web/Home/eng/

Housed in a renovated 1920s townhouse on hip Nanjing Road, this is wunderkind Singaporean hotelier and restaurateur Yenn Wong's follow-up to the original Jia in Hong Kong, designed by Philippe Starck. The 55 rooms combine luxe comforts—think plush beds, blackout curtains, plasma TVs, iPod docks, and ceiling-mounted Bose speakers—with trendsetting boutique styling, including artwork by photographer Russel Wong, outsize tubs in gold Bisazza-tile bathrooms, and furnishings by Minotti, Moroso, and Hans Wegner. Each room has a small kitchenette with a microwave oven, cookware, and serving dishes. The two stunning penthouse suites have extra theatrical flourishes, including contemporary art, a sunken circular Jacuzzi, and a shower that converts into a steam room. The chic lobby lounge, where you'll be served complimentary continental breakfast and afternoon tea, is dressed with giant Chinese bird cages and lacquer tableware. Shanghai's shaker-makers reserve dinner tables at Issimo, a modern Italian eatery created by Japan-based restaurateur Salvatore Cuomo. This is the place to stay for sophisticated small hotel chic.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Jumeirah Himalayas Hotel
1108 Mei Hua Road
Pudong
Shanghai
China 201204
Tel: 86 21 3858 0855
jhsinfo@jumeirah.com
www.jumeirah.com/en/hotels-and-resorts/destinations/Shanghai/Jumeirah-Himalayas-Hotel/

Jumeirah's first Asia hotel occupies the dappled concrete exterior (symbolizing tree roots) of the Himalayas art complex in Pudong. The hotel is not centrally located—it's five metro stops from Pudong's Lujiazui district and seven stops from People's Square, and it overlooks the Shanghai New International Expo Centre and Maglev terminal rather than the Bund and the Huangpu River. But the contemporary Chinese design motifs and art collection on display throughout (every piece is an original) merit the detour. A palatial lobby is decorated with back-lit calligraphy, gray courtyard brick, and a carved wooden pagoda hosting performances of traditional Chinese music. This sets the tone for a hotel full of impressively vast public spaces, including a landscaped terrace garden on the sixth floor. The exception is J-Mix sushi restaurant, which is intimately sized and elegantly dressed with polished floors, dark furnishings, and scarlet lamps. The 405 guest rooms are styled in a palette of cream and brown, with chocolate-veined caramel marble in the bathroom, plus burnished wood floors, reproduction Chinese furnishings, an iPod dock and wall-hung TV, and L'Occitane bath products (upgraded to Acqua di Parma in the club-floor rooms). The location means the majority of guests are exhibition and conference attendees, plus adventurous upscale travelers with an interest in art and a willingness to spend a few extra minutes on the subway.—Gary Bowerman

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
JW Marriott Hotel Shanghai
399 Nanjing Xi Lu
Shanghai
China 200003
Tel: 86 21 5359 4969
Fax: 86 21 6375 5988
marriott.com/property/propertypage.mi?marshaCode=SHAJW

Soaring above People's Square in an angular 60-story building is this airy hotel, flooded with light from floor-to-ceiling windows. The lobby is on the 38th floor and the hotel continues 24 stories upward, so spectacular views over the city come as standard in the 342 rooms. Furnishings are Art Deco–esque, but some touches—the diamond-patterned hunter-green carpeting and rosewood paneling, for instance—feel a bit staid compared with the look of the city's newer hotels. Two lounges and three restaurants offer both Chinese and Western fare. None particularly stands out, though the 40th-floor Champagne Lounge is a good place for a nighttime drink with a view over People's Square. A spacious fitness center, indoor and outdoor pools, and a branch of the Mandara Spa tick all the boxes for modern luxury, while a central location between the Bund and French Concession wins points for convenience.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Lapis Casa Hotel
68 Taicang Road
Shanghai
China
Tel: 86 21 5382 1600
reservation@lapiscasahotel.com
www.lapiscasahotel.com

The 18 antiques-filled guest rooms at this gem of a hotel are reminiscent of a romantic Parisian inn yet work for demanding business travelers as well as they do for vacationing couples. The young staff are uniformly helpful, making the extra effort to walk guests around the corner to flag down a taxi or recommend their favorite haunts, among them Xintiandi's hip bars and restaurants that draw both locals and expats. The three floors of rooms (there are no elevators) branch off long, narrow hallways decorated with Oriental rugs and stained glass windows. Four-poster beds, vintage-style bedside lamps, comfortable desks, and chocolate-scented candles round out these homes away from home. Standard bathrooms lack tubs, and the ring of a telephone in an adjacent room may be audible, but the hotel is extremely quiet given its central Shanghai location. Skip the stale hotel breakfast served in a French-themed eatery across the street; do, however, reserve a table at the in-house Japanese restaurant, packed nightly with fashionable diners.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Le Royal Méridien Shanghai
789 Nanjing Road East
Shanghai
China
Tel: 86 21 3318 9999
starwoodhotels.com

With considerable panache, Le Royal Méridien executes its Art Deco–inspired design throughout its 770 rooms, high above People's Park on central Nanjing Road. Above the eleventh-floor lobby, black lacquer–framed mirrors line hallways, and airy guest rooms have floor-to-ceiling windows. Chic marble bathrooms, plush velvet couches and club chairs, and beds with down duvets and oversized square pillows round out the stylish accommodations. Ai Mei, the Chinese restaurant already known for its dim sum, is entered through a door frame of glass tanks filled with goldfish; the menu at Allure—roasted lobster with risotto, beef tenderloin with goose liver—is worth the culinary detour. Even the spa here caters to a late-night clientele, staying open until 11 p.m., for those who can't sleep without a signature egg-white, vodka, and cucumber facial.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Longement Shanghai
1116 Yan An West Road
Shanghai
China
Tel: 86 21 6115 9988
www.thelongemonthotels.com

Though a serious business hotel, the 511-room Longement (formerly the Regent) has plenty of charm. Rooms have sleek, generous work spaces, pillowtop beds (where you'll find a mini-cheesecake at turndown), and suite showers with floor-to-ceiling glass windows overlooking the Puxi district. The young English-speaking staff are thoroughly professional, and there's a tennis court, a lap pool, and a spa with a Vichy shower. Sunday brunch is a global culinary tour, with choices ranging from Peking duck and sashimi to chicken and mashed potatoes. For a portable lunch, Tong's deli counter, a chic little eatery, does great takeaway.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Mansion Hotel
82 Xinle Lu
Shanghai
China 200037
Tel: 86 21 5403 9888
Fax: 86 21 5403 7077
www.chinamansionhotel.com

Step through the wrought-iron gates that guard the driveway to this elegant French Concession villa, and be transported back to Shanghai's legendary treaty port era. Built in 1932 as the business headquarters for Huang Jinrong, a notorious mob boss, the five-story limestone building was once the most powerful financial house in Shanghai, witnessing everything from opium trading to money laundering. Developer Lu-Jun Yin has given it a thorough makeover, and since it opened in 2007, it has become a perfectly placed option for those seeking a boutique hotel rather than a glitzy behemoth. The 30 rooms—some with balconies—may look charmingly old-fashioned with parquet floors, high ceilings, and glorious four-poster feather beds, but they are discreetly high-tech: Armoires contain flat-screen TVs, and there's broadband connection throughout. An airy lobby features Art Deco furniture interspersed with Shanghai memorabilia, including an antique gramophone that plays original recordings of famed 1920s Peking opera star Mei Lanfang. Private dining rooms offer Western and Chinese cuisine such as snapper with puttanesca sauce of tomatoes, capers, olives and anchovy or shrimp in black pepper sauce, while a rooftop lounge is the perfect spot to sip cocktails and admire the low red-tiled roofs of the former French Concession.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Park Hyatt Shanghai
79th–93rd Floors, Shanghai World Financial Center
100 Century Avenue
Pudong
Shanghai
China 200120
Tel: 86 21 6888 1234
shanghai.park@hyatt.com
www.Shanghai.park.hyatt.com

Shanghai hotels are rising ever higher—and top of the pile is this deluxe cloud buster on the 79th through 93rd floors of the 101-story, 1,615-foot Shanghai World Financial Center in Pudong. The Park Hyatt Shanghai can now claim the twin titles of world's highest hotel and world's highest restaurant. New York City–based Tony Chi created the interiors to resemble a sophisticated modern Chinese residence, hence the series of gates, halls, and chambers. The lobby itself is on the 87th floor and the spa and fitness center have prime city views from the 85th level. The 174 rooms are an impressive size (an average room is 645 square feet), plus there is 24-hour butler service, a technology concierge, and a walk-in dressing room and flat-screen TV in the bathroom and bedroom. The hotel's highest highlight is 100 Century Avenue, an integrated three-level fine-dining restaurant (serving Western, Chinese, and Japanese cuisine) and lounge bar on the 91st to 93rd floors.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Peninsula Shanghai
32 The Bund
Shanghai
China 200002
Tel: 86 21 2327 2888
psh@peninsula.com
www.peninsula.com/Shanghai/en/default.aspx

Talk about bagging the perfect location: The first new building on Shanghai's riverfront Bund in more than 60 years is home to the Peninsula Hotel group's debut in mainland China. Shanghai's most decadent hotel is dressed to impress, from its stepped, faux Deco facade to the grand pillared lobby decorated in cool celadon tones (a string quartet plays on a theatrical balcony in the afternoons) to the restored 1934 Rolls-Royce Phantom II for airport transfers. This is a hotel that makes the most of its outlook over the future-scape Pudong skyline, the Peninsula Spa by Espa features a skylit indoor swimming pool and a layered crème marble terrace, while the terrace of the 14th-floor Sir Elly's Restaurant has panoramic river views. The pick of the hotel's five restaurants is Yi Long Court, serving classic Cantonese cuisine in a luxurious chocolate and dark-blue Shanghai Deco dining room with Qing dynasty furnishings. The hotel's 235 guest rooms, styled in a pale gray-green or cerulean blue, start at a spacious 600 square feet and go up to the 4,300-square-foot Presidential Suite. All have 1920s Shanghai mahogany and ebony furniture. The in-room technology is best in class, with thoughtful additions such as a Nespresso machine positioned at shoulder level, a desktop iPod dock, a 1,000-channel Internet radio, and an in-bath phone system that filters out the sound of the water. Another flick of a switch dims the bathroom lights and turns on relaxing spa music.—Gary Bowerman

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Portman Ritz-Carlton, Shanghai
1376 Nanjing Xi Lu
Shanghai
China 200040
Tel: 86 21 6279 8888
Fax: 86 21 6279 8800
www.ritzcarlton.com/hotels/shanghai/

The Portman Ritz-Carlton was the city's first luxury hotel when it opened in 1998, on the major shopping thoroughfare Nanjing Lu (a second Ritz-Carlton property, located in Pudong, opened in 2010). A circular pale-marble lobby gives way to 610 rooms—request one of the newly renovated ones (the hotel was given a multimillion-dollar, top-to-bottom face-lift at the end of 2008), which feature gleaming dark-wood traditional furniture, accents of gold and brown, and sliding doors that lend an Oriental air. Guests are spoiled for choice when it comes to dining: There are four house restaurants to choose from, including Palladio, which serves modern Italian dishes in a formal setting. Luxury-brand lovers will delight in the neighboring upscale Plaza 66 mall. Though the hotel is centrally located at the Shanghai Center, surrounding office buildings mean that finding a cab during rush hour can be difficult—hotel guests do get preference in the taxi line, but the queue lengthens noticeably during peak times, from 4 pm until 8 pm.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Pudong Shangri-La
33 Fu Cheng Lu
Shanghai
China 200120
Tel: 866 565 5050 (toll-free)
Tel: 86 21 6882 8888
slpu@shangri-la.com
www.shangri-la.com/en/property/shanghai/pudongshangrila

With its new 36-floor glass tower, the Shangri-La is set to give its Pudong competitors a run for their money. It may not tower as high as the Grand Hyatt, but this hotel's gorgeous views stretch across the Huangpu River to the stately Bund and rival those of its taller (and sometimes more fogged-in) neighbor. All of the 950 modern rooms are unfussy, accented with Asian touches such as raw silk throws and pillows. Rooms also have broadband Internet, and satellite TV—just be sure to request accommodation that overlooks the water. Not one but two indoor pools and full-service gymnasiums satisfy the sporty, while those hoping to unwind can enjoy a massage in the Oriental opulence of the Chi spa. Eleven restaurants offer options to suit every taste, but there is no better place for a drink and nibble than Jade on 36, an eclectic fusion restaurant perched on the 36th floor. Though the Pudong location means that during rush hour (4 p.m.-9 p.m.) it can take 45 minutes to get downtown by car, taxis are cheap and plentiful, and those in a hurry can hop on the metro, which is only a five-minute walk from the hotel.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The PuLi Hotel & Spa
1 Changde Road
Shanghai
China 200040
Tel: 86 21 3203 9999
information@thepuli.com
www.thepuli.com

Few hotels in China present a more imperial entrance than the 209-room PuLi Hotel, located in Shanghai's new commercial district adjacent to fashionable Nanjing Road. Reached via a Chinese courtyard-style gate and gray brick arch, the palatial lobby features a 105-foot sunken bar backed by floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking a water garden. The space is decorated with polished ceramic-tile floors, antique Chinese furnishings, Jim Thompson Thai Silk wall coverings, and both contemporary sofas and Ming-style wooden armchairs, where Shanghai's young shakermakers sip chilled sauvignon blanc. If it's instant impressions that count, PuLi has the requisite X factor. A subtle blending of southeast Asian design motifs and traditional Chinese stylistic grandeur appears throughout the hotel, notably in the guest rooms, where elements like sliding latticed doors, dark wooden furniture, and stone statuettes are offset by high-tech amenities like an MP3 dock, flat-screen TVs in the bedroom and bathroom, and GSM portable phones. The menu at the Thai-rooted Anantara Spa employs the recuperative powers of Chinese green tea, while up-and-coming New Zealand chef Dane Clouston offers a modern take on comfort cuisine at the signature Jing'An restaurant.—Gary Bowerman

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Ritz-Carlton Shanghai, Pudong
Shanghai IFC, 8 Century Avenue
Shanghai
China 200120
Tel: 86 21 2020 1888
rc.shasz.leads@ritzcarlton.com
www.ritzcarlton.com/en/Properties/ShanghaiPudong/Default.htm

Shanghai's second Ritz-Carlton hotel (the Portman Ritz-Carlton is located across the river in Puxi) sits atop the 58-story Shanghai IFC South Tower in Pudong, part of a mixed-use office, residential, and luxury shopping complex with a metro station on its lower level. The 235-room hotel sits in quiet contemplation of the frenzied financial district below. Upon exiting the burgundy stingray-skin lifts into the 52nd-floor lobby, the sharp angles, glossy dark woods, and chrome detailing reference Shanghai's glamorous 1930s Art Deco era with a contemporary twist. But the big attention-grabber is the dramatic view of the Huangpu River and Shanghai's famous skyline (especially dazzling after dark) through floor-to-ceiling windows. Book the Bund-facing rooms, where the huge bed and claw-footed copper bathtub are angled to take in the magnificent sweep of historic buildings along the riverfront. You're more likely to find yourself glued to the vista than to the 42-inch TV screens. Espresso machines, Blu-ray disc players, and Acqua di Parma bath products are some of the luxuries you can expect. Come cocktail hour, head up to the Flair restaurant and bar on the 58th floor. Its stepped, terrace strewn with large loungers has arguably the best views in Shanghai.—Amy Fabris-Shi

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
St. Regis Shanghai
889 Dong Fang Lu
Shanghai
China 200122
Tel: 86 21 5050 4567
stregis.shanghai@stregis.com
www.starwoodhotels.com/stregis/property/overview/index.html?propertyID=1365

The 328-room St. Regis has sizable sleeping quarters that are just about as grand as the sweeping, ballroomlike check-in area. Special amenities include 24-hour butler service, "rain forest showers" that simulate bathing beneath a waterfall, and ladies-only floors (three of them) that promise Bulgari bath products, complimentary women's magazines, and female butlers. The hotel also houses two lounges and three restaurants—including the lauded Italian spot Danieli's (try the roasted veal cutlet with morel mushroom sauce). The only downfall? It's located on the east side of the Yangtze River, in the Pudong district, but most visitors claim the level of lavishness is worth the short commute back into the center of the action.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Urbn Hotel
183 Jiaozhou Road
Shanghai
China 200040
Tel: 86 21 5153 4600
info@urbnhotels.com
www.urbnhotels.com

Tucked away on a side street north of Jing'An Temple, this 26-room design hotel is built around an enclosed slate and bamboo courtyard with calming water fountains. Constructed using reclaimed local materials —such as gray factory bricks, mahogany, and slate—Urbn wears its eco-conscious credentials on its sleeve; the hotel also tracks its ecological footprint and matches it in carbon credits. The rooms, in five categories, are all relatively small but make good use of space with low-level beds and a sunken "lounge" area, complete with hemp cushions on the broad benches and a wall-hung flat-screen TV. Neat in-room design touches include mahogany floors and wall paneling, desk chairs made from compressed cardboard, and under-floor bathroom heating, plus free Wi-Fi and iPod docks. Contemporary Australian-Asian cuisine is served in the ground-floor restaurant, Roomtwentyeight.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Waldorf Astoria Shanghai on the Bund
88 Sichuan Zhong Road
Shanghai
China 200002
Tel: 86 21 6322 9988
shawa.info@waldorfastoria.com
www.waldorfastoriashanghai.com/english

Spread across two buildings—20 suites in the beautifully restored 1911 Shanghai Club, 252 rooms and suites in the newly built tower—this hotel is a magnificent homage to Shanghai's swank European past. In addition to opulent colonial-style suites (four-poster beds, walk-in closets, claw-foot tubs), the old building, now called the Waldorf Astoria Club, has a jaw-dropping 110-foot-long bar with Bund views. Rooms are neoclassical—pale-green linen wallpaper, matching silk bedcovers, and carpets with swirling flower motifs—but have all the mod cons, as well as a bathroom where a TV is embedded in the mirror and the Japanese-style toilet has water jets (don't say you weren't warned). Beyond the bells and whistles, the formal service, and the undeniable comfort, the most memorable part of a stay here is the opportunity to glimpse local high society. During an afternoon tea of delicate red velvet cakes served in the elegant Salon de Ville, watch newly minted Shanghainese millionaires reimagining themselves as the tycoons of yore.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Waterhouse at South Bund
1–3 Maojiayuan Road, Zhongshan Road South
Shanghai
China 200011
Tel: 86 21 6080 2988
reservations@waterhouseshanghai.com
www.waterhouseshanghai.com

The Waterhouse's battered concrete walls and bare brick floors are far removed from the marbled glitz so often associated with new Shanghai hotels—almost as far removed as the location, at the far south end of the Bund. But the edgy, pared-back appeal of this former 1930s factory is exactly the draw for the modish, designer crowd that frequently books the 19-room boutique property. Arranged around an internal courtyard, the rooms are each a different size and layout, from poky (215 square feet) to plush (580 square feet). We like No. 21 for its private walled terrace, walk-in shower, and deep concrete tub, and No. 33, which features a double-height window that frames river views. Rooms come with free Wi-Fi and minibar, plus an iPod dock and espresso machine—but there is no on-site gym or pool. The 60-seat Table No. 1 restaurant—the first independent venue for Michelin-starred British chef Jason Atherton—has emerged as one of the city's top tables, serving up mod-European dishes and a casual vibe. Don't miss the artfully rusted rooftop cocktail bar on a balmy night, nor your chance to take a spin around the neighborhood in the sidecar of the reproduction WWII-era Chang Jiang 750 cc motorbike that is often parked outside the hotel.—Amy Fabris-Shi

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Westin Bund Center
88 Henan Central Road
Shanghai
China 200002
Tel: 86 21 6335 1888
rsvns-shanghai@westin.com
www.starwoodhotels.com/westin/search/hotel_detail.html?propertyID=1379

Popular with travelers on an expense account, this centrally located hotel—part of the office-heavy Bund Center—is just a short walk from the swish restaurants and nightlife of the Bund. The glitzy atrium lobby features a neon-lit glass staircase and artificial palm trees, while the 570 rooms are kitted out in earth tones, with polished wood paneling and rain forest showerheads in the dark granite bathrooms. A new wing, the Grand Tower, opened in 2007; formerly serviced apartments, rooms here are more spacious, albeit pricier, than in the main building. With so many business travelers passing through the halls, service can feel a bit impersonal and corporate—front desk clerks eagerly push upgrades at check-in. There are three restaurants—we liked the wood-fired pizzas at Prego better than The Stage's buffet—as well as a fitness center, swimming pool, and branch of the Banyan Tree spa.

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.