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Singapore Hotels

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
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Amara Sanctuary Resort Sentosa
I Larkhill Road
Sentosa Island
Singapore 099394
Tel: 65 6825 3888
sentosa@amarasanctuary.com
www.amarahotels.com/en/locations/sanctuary

This 121-room retreat sits just over the bridge from Singapore on the island of Sentosa, a government-designated "fun zone" that caters to professionals escaping the city's frenetic pace. The draws—clean beaches, laid-back bars, and lively restaurants, all linked to the hotel by shuttle bus—also make the Amara a worthwhile add-on for visitors to the city. The 20 suites were originally World War II British military barracks, and architect Masaki Miyake has retained quirky historic details such as boot-sole cleaners outside each door. However, the prevailing vibe is purely modern, with clean-lined dark wood furniture, muted textiles, and sunken marble tubs. Though interiors feel urban, the view outside is purely tropical: lush jungle, unobstructed sea views, and three pools (one for adults only). Though it's tempting to remain on-site for pampering at the small spa, it's worth venturing off-property for more exotic treatments like fish reflexology at nearby Underwater World.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Capella Singapore
1 The Knolls
Sentosa Island
Singapore 098297
Tel: 65 6377 8888
Fax: 65 6337 3455
www.capellasingapore.com

An exquisite Sentosa Island colonial/modern hybrid on 30 acres, the first Asian outpost of the nascent Capella brand is a poised yet easygoing hotel that's refreshing for straight-laced Singapore. The new architecture, by Foster & Partners, fuses gracefully with the 1880s main building, a former British military entertainment hall; guest rooms spread across contemporary wings at either end of it, and villas and manor houses fan out belowall perched above the South China Sea. The standard Premier rooms sprawl over 828 square feet and have big balconies. Designer Jaya Ibrahim, known for his meditative touches at several Amanresorts, brings his muted elegance to the interiors, with gray-linen walls, neutral-hued silk pillows, and clean-lined dark-wood furniture. The stellar service starts even before check-in, with a phone call and an e-mail from your multilingual "personal assistant," who arranges dinner reservations, excursions, local mobile phones, appointments at the hotel's sublime Auriga Spa, and the like. Our reviewer's keenly observant PA followed through on an offhand remark about needing to track down a Chinatown address and surprised the reviewer's five-year-old sidekick with a kid-size pink bathrobe at turndown. One caveat: Booking a private airport transfer through the hotel can cost up to ten times the local taxi fare. Inflation pervades the room service menu, too; instead, ask your PA to reserve a table at the hotel's Cassia, the Chinese restaurant designed by Hong Kong wunderkind Andre Fu, who filled the sunny dining room with hand-painted butterflies, dramatic arching lanterns, and soaring latticework screens.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
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Crowne Plaza Changi Airport
75 Airport Boulevard
Singapore 819664
Tel: 65 6823 5300
www.singapore.crowneplaza.com

This striking 320-room eco-chic airport hotel provides stylish shelter around Singapore's busy airport. The carbon-fiber-mesh exterior, which resembles a latticework of orchids, naturally cools the structure by blocking 60 percent of the sun's rays. The building shape enhances air flow, as do the open corridors between guest rooms, minimizing the need for air-conditioning. Door frames are rubber lined for better sound proofing and double-glazed floor-to-ceiling windows offer fascinating (and noiseless) airfield views. Beds come with comfortable Ploh sheets, and bathrooms have rain showers and are naturally lit by opaque corridor-facing windows. Business travelers will appreciate the ergonomic chair and elongated desk, and a $38 fee gets you into the Club Lounge, which has free Wi-Fi and around-the-clock snacks. Even locals come here for the well-priced international buffet at Azur, which has everything from prime cuts to local noodle dishes; expense account travelers, meanwhile, head to Imperial Treasure, the latest outlet of Singapore's top Cantonese restaurant. Silk Air and Singapore Airlines passengers can check in for their flight in the lobby; for passengers on other airlines, bellmen will still transport luggage to the terminals.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Fairmont Singapore
80 Bras Basah Road
Singapore
Tel: 65 6339 7777
singapore@fairmont.com
www.fairmont.com/singapore

Want the luxury of the legendary Raffles Hotel at a slightly more reasonable price? Join the other value-conscious types across the street at the Fairmont, and you'll get access to the historic hotel's restaurants and facilities. The perks and location make up for the relatively bland design and ho-hum crowds, which skew toward business types in Hillary Clinton–inspired pantsuits. Still, rooms are well maintained and spacious (standards start at 412 square feet), with modern honey-wood furniture, fluffy white duvets, and muted art. The upper floors—with their panoramic views—comprise a hotel-within-a-hotel dubbed Raffles Inc. Business travelers will find it's worth upgrading to one of these 84 rooms for the large working desks and access to meeting rooms, a gym, and a private lounge that serves complimentary breakfast and evening cocktails. Overall, the Fairmont has 769 rooms, so it's no wonder the staff seems a tad overworked. But the size is an advantage at feeding times, with 16 on-site dining outlets offering everything from Japanese to Italian to spicy Szechuan.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Four Seasons Hotel Singapore
190 Orchard Boulevard
Orchard Road District
Singapore
Tel: 65 6734 1110
Fax: 65 6733 0682
www.fourseasons.com/singapore/

Swankier hotels have sprung up around this compact island nation, but the Four Seasons remains Singapore's gold standard when it comes to service and creature comforts, from home-baked cookies at turndown to doormen who miraculously recall guests' names and faces. A $7.3 million renovation in 2008 assured that the decor would match the service. Warm mocha and toffee fabrics make for serene spaces in the 255 rooms, and cherry blossom–patterned rugs nod to local culture. Equally up-to-date are the tech offerings, including Wi-Fi, 42-inch flat-screen televisions, and MP3 players. Brunch is a time-honored Singapore tradition, and the Four Seasons has two of the best. One offers a full 100 dishes each weekend at the Jiang-Nan Chun Chinese restaurant, where locals gorge on everything from coffee spare ribs and wasabi prawns to more adventurous plates like double-boiled rana, a dessert made with frog saliva and red dates. Even more famous is the sprawling Sunday Champagne brunch in the hotel's lobby-level eatery—long a favorite of Singapore's bubbly-loving expatriates, who spend the afternoon overfilling their stomachs with freshly shucked oysters, grilled lobster, and grain-fed foie gras.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Fullerton Bay Hotel
80 Collyer Quay
Singapore 049178
Tel: 65 6333 8388
info@fullertonbayhotel.com
www.fullertonbayhotel.com

The fact that this glass box of a hotel is built on the 1927 Clifford Pier, a whitewashed architectural gem where immigrants from India, China, and beyond once poured in, reflects Singapore's no-looking-back drive to modernize. Expansive guest rooms swathed in rich browns and glossy woods overlook Marina Bay. Generously proportioned marble bathrooms come with a rain shower and separate tub. The service is impeccable (staff immediately know you by name), and the rooftop bar, Lantern, is a buzzy place to sip a Singapore sling at day's end. The supreme comfort, ideal location, and knockout Marina Bay views from floor-to-ceiling windows and balconies make this a major player.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Fullerton Hotel
1 Fullerton Square
Singapore
Tel: 65 6733 8388
reservations@fullertonhotel.com
www.fullertonhotel.com

When it opened in 1928 as Singapore's central post office, the classic wedding-cake Fullerton Building was the largest structure in the city. Still imposing today and ideally set at the mouth of the Singapore River between the Financial District and the Esplanade performing-arts center, it's been a hotel for high-end travelers (especially business types) since 2001. The sweeping grand porte cochere leads to a soaring lobby, where fluted Doric columns support a skylight ceiling sheathed in rice paper. The 399 large, posh guest rooms and suites are decorated in cool contemporary style, and all have views of either the riverfront promenade and harbor or a sunny courtyard atrium. The Quay and Heritage rooms have private verandas. The six on-site restaurants and bars are all top-notch, especially the penthouse haute-Italian San Marco at the Lighthouse, and Jade, which serves creative Chinese cuisine. Town, the swanky 24-hour café, is a top choice for power business lunches.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Grand Hyatt Singapore
10 Scotts Road
Singapore 228211
Tel: 65 6738 1234
singapore.grand@hyatt.com
www.singapore.grand.hyatt.com

That commotion outside really is all of Singapore passing in front of this venerable hotel, located smack in the center of the city. Some of that cacophony extends to the lobby, a bustling crossroads of civilization, but a calm silence reigns on the guest-room floors, where sleek, neutral-hued hallways lead to quarters renovated in 2008. Large standard rooms (starting at 515 square feet) are spare and modern with blond wood beds, a long work desk, and a roomy marble bath with sunken tub. Thoughtful design elements—like closets with sliding doors on both sides for maximum access, and extended power sockets—cater to business and leisure travelers alike. Grand Club suites separate the cozy sleeping space from an expansive living area big enough to accommodate a cocktail party (though the decadent nightly spread in the Club Lounge will lure you out of your quarters). More delicious edibles can be found around the large outdoor pool and in Mezza9 and Straits Kitchen, where you can take a culinary tour of Singapore street food without the usual sweating and schlepping. Those who prefer to take their indulgences lying down head to Damai Spa, where treatments include elements of Indian Ayurveda and traditional Chinese medicine.

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Klapsons
15 Hoe Chiang Road
Tower 15
Singapore 89316
Tel: 65 6521 9030
info@klapsons.com
klapsons.com

A futuristic, fun-loving vibe emanates from this 17-room find edging the central business district. Pink-neon recessed lighting, funky molded plastic chairs, and orange Perspex accent tables add a playful touch to the double-height lobby. Free perks include minibar items and a generous breakfast of croissants, toast, and eggs at Lucas, the chic adjacent eatery. The guest rooms vary in decor (one room is all-white, another features a cylindrical shower in the center of the room), but all have ultramodern yet comfortable furniture by boldfaced designers–as in the curvilinear Moraine divan by Zaha Hadid and the polycarbonate Stone Stools by Marcel Wanders. There are more practical touches, too: Spacious closets are scented with satchels of dried flowers, and all rooms offer carpeting that beckons bare feet as well as lighting that you can manipulate from low and sexy to serious and businesslike. Suites add an outdoor hot tub edged with bamboo stalks and high wooden fences. Rooms could do with fewer superfluous details like the ornate etchings on bathroom mirrors, but overall the aesthetics, edibles, and service outshine those at Singapore's slew of other small hotels.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Mandarin Oriental, Singapore
5 Raffles Avenue
Singapore 039797
Tel: 65 6338 0066
mosin-reservations@mohg.com
www.mandarinoriental.com/singapore/&kw=general&htl=mosin&eng=concierge&src=cpm

A new name and a multimillion-dollar renovation have turned this once drab address into the talk of the town. Staffers keep the 527 earth-hued guest rooms utterly spotless and seamlessly handle all requests with unobtrusive friendliness. The design places a premium on comfort and function, with pillow-top beds, roomy closets, a sizable work station, and ergonomic desk chairs. Book a suite facing Marina Bay for views of the Singapore Flyer and the Merlion, a sculpture of the country's whimsical mascot. If funds allow, opt for a room on floors 18 to 21, which confer access to the Oriental Club Lounge, a top-floor spread with private meeting space, panoramic harbor views, and complimentary cocktail hours. On-site, you'll find a small but serene spa with the massages, couples treatments, and facials for which Mandarin Oriental is known, as well as a sprawling pool so lush it feels more tropical resort than urban high-rise. Dining options include everything from dim sum and sushi to hearty Morton's steaks for the homesick.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
New Majestic
31-37 Bukit Pasoh Road
Chinatown
Singapore
Tel: 65 6222 3377
reservation@newmajestichotel.com
www.newmajestichotel.com

In the heart of Chinatown, this arty little hotel is more fun than a barrelful of Dadaists. Each of its 30 rooms has been designed by a regional artist, and some—like Singaporean film director Glen Goei's Wayang Room, a romantic fantasy with red silk sheets, lanterns, and drapes—are reasonably sedate and tasteful. Others, though, are off-the-wall whimsical. The Aquarium Room, created by interior designer Colin Seah, has a bathroom inside a glass cube in the middle of the room. And fashion-show producer Daniel Boey's Pussy Parlour (inspired by the outlandish photography of David LaChapelle) forthrightly evokes a bordello with its theatrical chandeliers, neon lights, mirrors, and color scheme in blinding fuschia. All the rooms are fully functional and (sometimes surprisingly) comfortable, with feather beds and pillows, and baths appointed with Kiehl's toiletries. The Majestic restaurant is one of the hippest eateries in town and serves variations on traditional Cantonese cookery; try the crispy wasabi prawns and Peking duck served with pan-fried foie gras.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Perak Hotel
12 Perak Road
Little India
Singapore
Tel: 65 6299 7733
reservations@peraklodge.net
www.peraklodge.net

The Perak Hotel (formerly Perak Lodge) is as famous in its own way as Raffles: It has long been Singapore's best little budget hotel. The 34 rooms are nice-sized, immaculate, and furnished with basic wood furniture and colorful throw pillows. All have TVs, mini-fridges, and bright, clean bathrooms; upper-floor rooms have DVD players. Breakfast is served each morning in a sunny little café off the lobby. The Chinese staff is friendly and helpful, always happy to advise you about where to go and how to get around town. The location, just off the bustling bazaar of Little India, is a big draw. Dozens of excellent curry houses and budget restaurants are within a few blocks of the hotel, and there's an MRT subway station a five-minute walk away.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Raffles Hotel
1 Beach Road
Financial District
Singapore
Tel: 65 6337 1886
raffles@raffles.com
www.raffleshotel.com

This legendary property, built in 1887, is probably Singapore's most famous tourist attraction. Long before the 1991 renovation that transformed the hotel from a run-down curio into a gleaming landmark, a Singapore Sling at the hotel's Long Bar, where the sugary pink cocktail was first mixed, was de rigueur for visitors. Some say the old girl now gleams too much: The public areas on the first three floors have been turned into a mall-like shopping and dining complex trading on the hotel's famous name. Hotel guests, though, still get to experience the elegant ease of colonial-era Southeast Asia. The 103 standard suites have high ceilings, antique reproduction furnishings, Oriental carpets on polished teak floors, and small sitting rooms and dressing areas. The 12 Personality Suites, which have spacious parlors and dining areas, also include photographs, letters, and memorabilia of some of the hotel's famous guests, such as Rudyard Kipling, Charlie Chaplin, Noël Coward, and Somerset Maugham (who wrote many of his most famous stories here). The signature restaurant, the Raffles Grill, is a bit stuffy and more than a bit overpriced, but a full breakfast overlooking the courtyard shouldn't be missed.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Ritz-Carlton, Millenia Singapore
7 Raffles Avenue
Marina Bay
Singapore
Tel: 65 6337 8888
Fax: 65 6337 5190
www.ritzcarlton.com/hotels/singapore/

This chic, light-filled tower in the waterfront Marina Centre business complex was designed by Pritzker Prize–winning architect Kevin Roche (who also co-designed New York City's U.N. Plaza). Inside, business travelers in expensive suits relax among an impressive collection of avant-garde American art, including paintings by Andy Warhol and Frank Stella and a spectacular Dale Chihuly glass sculpture that dominates the lobby. The 608 guest rooms are large (550 square feet for standard rooms), with dramatic floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking the harbor. The marble bathrooms also have big octagonal windows (which have prompted the hotel staff to describe them as "the world's sexiest bathrooms"). Room furnishings are clean-lined but not minimalist, with just enough Asian touches (lacquered or dark-wood tables, silk throw pillows) to remind you you're in Singapore. The higher-priced rooms and suites (which can be up to 2,000 square feet) have feather beds and Bulgari bath products. The spa offers a decadent array of massages and treatments, including a chocolate fondue body wrap.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Shangri-La Singapore
22 Orange Grove Road
Singapore
Tel: 65 6737 3644
sls@shangri-la.com
www.shangri-la.com/singapore/

The Shangri-La's magnificent 750-room property, centered around 15 acres of lush tropical gardens, is the closest thing to a resort hotel in Singapore. Though it's just a short stroll from downtown and the Orchard Road shopping strip, there's enough to do on property to keep guests busy for a week. The five excellent restaurants include Shang Palace for classical Cantonese; Nadaman, one of Singapore's most elegant Japanese restaurants; and BLU, the hotel's signature eatery. A 24/7 café dubbed the Line has taken cafeteria-style dining to haute levels, with 16 fully loaded (and well executed) culinary stations. Warning: Overindulgence in the breakfast spread has led many a guest to scrap sightseeing in favor of a morning nap. There's also a massive outdoor pool with a hot tub, a three-hole pitch-and-putt golfing green, spa treatment rooms, a beauty salon, a fitness center, a drugstore, and a pastry shop. The hotel even offers cultural enrichment programs, including walking tours of its superb horticultural collection, Chinese tea appreciation, cooking classes, and introductions to yoga and tai chi. The accommodations fall into three distinct categories. The 458 guest rooms in the original tower are the most basic, with wall-to-wall carpet and streamlined, modern furnishings in honey-colored wood. The Garden Wing has 151 larger, tropical-themed rooms, with wood floors, bamboo shades, and balconies swathed in bougainvillea overlooking the lagoon-like pool. The 131 Valley Wing rooms and suites are princely, with chandeliers, carved-wood doors, and major acreage for the CEO who wants to make a statement.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
St. Regis Singapore
29 Tanglin Road
Singapore
247911
Tel: 65 6506 6888
stregis.singapore@stregis.com
www.starwoodhotels.com/stregis/property/overview/index.html?propertyID=1533

The fleet of shiny Bentleys parked outside this striking metal-and-glass tower hints at the comfort that waits within: Reception formalities are carried out at one of three writing desks in the lobby before a more personal greeting from one of the butlers, individually assigned to each of 299 guest rooms. While he unpacks your bags in your glossy Art Deco–inspired room, you can head to the second-floor pool, where cushy loungers turn this predominantly business hotel into a tropical escape. A well-equipped gym sits adjacent, as does LaBrezza café, where Moroccan-style grilled prawn or beef kebabs offer a healthy alternative to the fast-food outlets that dominate nearby Orchard Road. Nightly tastings are held at the wine bar Decanter, whose lounge also serves witty cocktails such as the Macrobiotic, made with basil leaves, organic honey, and Tanqueray. Unwind before bed in the deep tub at the center of the mirror- and marble-filled bathroom, generously stocked with fluffy towels from Ploh. This trailblazing local brand is also responsible for the smooth bed linens, elegant bathrobes, and form-fitting slippers.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Wanderlust
2 Dickson Road
Singapore 209494
Tel: 65 6396 3322
reservations@wanderlusthotel.com
wanderlusthotel.com

In a 1920s building in Little India, the 29-room Wanderlust is a whimsical and stylish showcase of Singapore's new generation of designers. The lobby, by hot design company Asylum, is all industrial chic, with polished concrete floors, reupholstered barber's chairs, shopping carts retrofitted as chairs, and a foosball table. It shares its open space with a too-cool bar (stools are fashioned from recycled metal) and a French restaurant, Cocotte, where a huge spidery chandelier made of black desk lamps hangs above communal tables. Each of the four floors was designed by a different local architectural firm, all of which ran with their funky creativity: The second-floor rooms are brightly monochrome; the third floor has white pop-art rooms inspired by origami and pop-up books, with backlit trompe l'oeil "furnishings" and "windows" against the walls (the bed, of course, is real). The quarters can be small—some showers and toilets are tucked into frosted-glass cabinets—but they're comfortable and functional, with free Wi-Fi, coffee, and tea. Also complimentary is a yummy breakfast of homemade waffles or eggs and pastries. Staff are knowledgeable and friendly, and the cutest service touch is the "passport" presented to guests: It's filled with hand-drawn maps of cool restaurants, shops, and bazaars in the raucous Little India neighborhood.

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.