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Telluride See And Do

Golf
Telluride , Colorado

Located inside Mountain Village, the Telluride Golf Course at the Peaks Resort elevates your game to 9,300 feet above sea level, where the thin air promises 15 percent more distance for your Titleist. The par-71, 6,739-yard course is open May to mid-October. Carts are equipped with GPS systems (970-728-7320; tellurideskiresort.com).

Horseback Riding
Telluride , Colorado

Telluride Horseback Adventures trots riders along trails below the Wilson Range, including Mt. Wilson, the majestic peak on the Coors beer logo. The outfit conducts sunrise and sunset rides, day trips, and custom pack trips into the San Juan Mountains backcountry (970-728-9611; www.ridewithroudy.com).

Mountain Biking
Telluride , Colorado

The capitals of American dirt single-tracks—Durango, Crested Butte, and Moab—may all be within two and a half hours of Telluride, but with hundreds of miles of trails, Telluride itself is no slouch. Visit Bootdoctors, which runs easy, mostly downhill tours for novices and intermediates, and sells maps and guidebooks for gnarlier riders. Bootdoctors also rents a variety of full-suspension bikes (970-728-8954; www.bootdoctors.com). Don't miss the flowing, aspen-shaded single-tracks Deep Creek Trail and Jurassic Trail.

Music Festivals
Telluride , Colorado

The two biggest wingdings of Telluride's festival-packed calendar induce a lot of dancing in Tevas. The Telluride Bluegrass Festival takes place mid-June, during four of the longest days of the year, and a couple of weeks before the daily afternoon thunderstorms kick in. Expect the likes of bigger acts such as Barenaked Ladies and Bonnie Raitt, as well as less organized acts, including roving bands of banjos. The other biggie is the Telluride Blues & Brews Festival, which is exactly what the name says. It takes place each September with acts like Willie Nelson and the Flaming Lips.

National Parks

Three striking—and strikingly different—national parks are a short drive from Telluride. About two hours south is Mesa Verde, where visitors can climb a 32-foot-tall ladder, crawl through a 12-foot-long tunnel, and then scamper an additional 60 feet up ladders and stone steps to visit Balcony House, a 14th-century Anasazi cliff dwelling (www.nps.gov/meve). Two and a half hours west, in Utah, is Arches National Park, where eons ago rushing waters carved out arches, narrow canyons, and oddly-shaped rocks (www.nps.gov/arch). Near Montrose, Colorado, about 90 minutes north, is Black Canyon of the Gunnison, established in 1999. Eleven hundred feet across at its narrowest point and 2,772 feet deep, the canyon's dark walls are shaded most of the day, begetting the name. Fly-fishing, kayaking, and hiking rarely get more dramatic (www.nps.gov/blca).

Skiing and Snowboarding
Telluride , Colorado
Tel: 970 728 6900
www.tellurideskiresort.com

Telluride Ski Resort is challenging: Thirty-eight percent of its 2,000 skiable acres are rated advanced or expert. On average, annual snowfall is a respectable 309 inches, but the quality is more impressive than the quantity. Storms from the Pacific lose moisture while traveling over the desert, and snow falls so light and fluffy here it can't be packed into a snowball. The Telluride skier or snowboarder is often more advanced than the Vail-goer, for there are fewer groomers and more mogul-studded steeps, particularly double-diamond Electra and Little Rose, which spill down Gold Hill.

Unless you're sensitive to high altitudes, the must-do run at Telluride is See Forever. When you slide off the Gold Hill chair at the resort's 12,570-foot apex, you'll be significantly higher than any lift in California, Utah, or Montana. See Forever starts here, and as you drop down this always-groomed intermediate pitch you can see deep into the red-rock canyons near Moab and the La Sal mountains emerging from the Great Basin like islands in the sky. Advanced bumpers schuss the egg cartons of the run Plunge, while rubbery teenage snowboarders flip and spin in the Air Garden Terrain Park. Skilled backcountry skiers or riders (equipped with shovels and avalanche transceivers—and the knowledge to use them) can pass through a Forest Service access gate and drop more than 4,000 vertical feet into the sheer, cliffy Bear Creek drainage. Rent or demo skis or a snowboard from Paragon Sports.

Telluride Farmer's Market
Telluride , Colorado
81435
Tel: 970 728 8701

A virtual block party, the farmer's market brings musicians, farmers, tourists, and fresh organic produce to South Oak Street every Friday afternoon from noon to 4 pm (June through October). Along with fruits and vegetables you'll find organic wines, elk and buffalo meat, and fresh local eggs. Look for TFM's signature shopping bags: burlap coffee sacks with the denim from old jeans sewn on as straps.

Open Fridays 11 am to 4 pm.

Waterfalls
Telluride , Colorado

Because the San Juans are Colorado's steepest range and all that snowmelt has to go somewhere, Telluride boasts stunning waterfalls. The easiest to reach is 60-foot Cornet Falls, just a quarter mile up a steep dirt trail from the top of Aspen Street. Ingram Falls is also noteworthy: It's the huge, 125-foot white ribbon you can see clearly from town. Reach it by driving east on Colorado Avenue past the old Pandora Mill, and up the dirt road toward Black Bear Pass. Along the way, you'll round a switchback and see the most dramatic, Bridal Veil Falls, which plunges more than 300 feet, making it the tallest free-falling chute in Colorado. For more information, call the local Forest Service office (970-327-4261).

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.