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Tokyo Hotels

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Ana Intercontinental
1-12-33 Akasaka
Minato-ku
Tokyo
Japan 107-0052
Tel: 81 3 3505 1111
info@anaintercontinental-tokyo.jp
Metro: Tameike-sanno and Roppongi-itchome
www.anaintercontinental-tokyo.jp

There's something for everyone at Ana Intercontinental, a central Roppongi hotel that was renovated in 2007. The rooms are modern while still nodding to Japan's aesthetic past: Traditional colors such as indigo and red balance out the contemporary, minimal furnishings, and those looking to soak in the bath have the added bonus of in-tub TV screens. The striking views play out like a personality test: Do you prefer the bright lights of Roppongi, the quiet grandeur of the Imperial Palace, or the sublime beauty of Mount Fuji? Even the in-house dining and drinking options—there are 12 total—cover all the bases. Besides the expected (three Japanese restaurants, a steak house), there are also a few surprises, such as the two-Michelin-star Pierre Gagnaire restaurant, the Champagne Bar, and the top floor's Mixx Bar & Lounge, which, since opening in September 2010, has been drawing in stylish crowds with its inventive molecular cocktails, bowls of truffle-oil popcorn, and fantastic panoramas of Tokyo.—Rebecca Willa Davis

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Andon Ryokan
2-34-10 Nihonzutsumi
Taito-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 3873 8611
ryokan@andon.co.jp
Metro: Minowa
www.andon.co.jp

Designed by an architecture professor from Tokyo's Waseda University, Andon offers friendly Japanese-style accommodation at very low rates. Set in the residential neighborhood of Minowa, this is a taste of real life in Tokyo, just two subway stops from Ueno. Rooms are simple, with tatami floors and futons. There's free Internet access plus TV and DVD in every room. There are showers on each floor, laundry facilities, and a cooked breakfast for a bargain 500 yen (about $4).

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Claska
1-3-18 Chuo-cho
Meguro-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 3719 8121
info@claska.com
Metro: Meguro
www.claska.com

Claska is a unique, 18-room hotel in Meguro on the fourth and fifth floors of a 1970s block renovated by the hip Tokyo architects Intentionallies. No two rooms are the same, but all are serene and light, with handcrafted wooden furniture and modern Japanese styling. Number 401 is a large double with its own terrace. Three of the rooms are for rent on a weekly or monthly basis, and there are an additional 23 residential rooms available for long-term stays (with room rates that depend on the length of your stay). Claska has a gallery space, a low-lit lounge bar that is popular on weekends, and an art and design bookshop. It's also home to Tokyo's grooviest dog salon, DogMan. The hotel is not centrally located, but the neighborhood is quickly filling up with design and furniture stores.—Updated by Rebecca Willa Davis

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Conrad Tokyo
1-9-1 Higashi-Shimbashi
Minato-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 6388 8000
Metro: Shiodome
tokyo.conradmeetings.com

Like most new hotels in Tokyo, the Conrad—a Hilton Worldwide hotel in the recently developed Shiodome area—sits high above the city. Take the elevator to the 28th floor and emerge at the reception and bar area for stunning views of the historic garden of Hamarikyu and across Tokyo Bay. The look here is modern Japanese, with dark wooden corridors and giant contemporary artworks. The 290 larger-than-average rooms are decorated in reds on the city-view side and greens for those overlooking the garden. Typical Japanese touches include cherry blossom murals and carpets, lantern-style lights, and Italian brand Acca Kappa toiletries in the spacious bathrooms. There are four restaurants: a Japanese, a very popular Chinese (both with panoramic views), and the new star draw, Gordon Ramsay at Conrad Tokyo, as well as a brasserie, Cerise by Gordon Ramsay. Other claims to fame: the city's largest spa (with a gym, ten treatment rooms, and a vast swimming pool), 24-hour room service, and wireless phones for guests to use in the hotel.—Updated by Rebecca Willa Davis

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Four Seasons Hotel Tokyo at Chinzan-so
2-10-8 Sekiguchi
Bunkyo-ku
Tokyo
Japan 112-8667
Tel: 81 3 3943 2222
Fax: 81 3 3943 2300
Metro: Edogawabashi and Mejiro
www.fourseasons.com/tokyo/

The first Four Seasons to open in Asia is hidden down a side street in Sekiguchi overlooking a 17-acre, 600-year-old traditional Japanese garden. Your view includes a three-story pagoda and a private well, from which the hotel receives its water. The 259 rooms—filled with brocade chairs, gold tasseled curtains, and plush floral carpets—offer up enough amenities to keep guests inside (deep-soaking tubs with mini TVs, views of either the garden or the Tokyo skyline), but the real draw indoors is the hotel's spa, which opened in 2007. Each treatment room connects to its own private patio with rock sculptures and walls lined with bamboo, as well as an in-house onsen, making the Four Seasons Hotel at Chinzan-so the only hotel in Tokyo to pipe in mineral water from the Izu Peninsula. Other facilities include a swimming pool with a retractable roof, a 24-hour health club, and three restaurants (including Il Teatro).—Rebecca Willa Davis

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Four Seasons Hotel Tokyo at Marunouchi
Pacific Century Place
1-11-1 Marunouchi
Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 800 819 5053 (toll-free)
Tel: 81 3 5222 7222
reservations.mar@fourseasons.com
Metro: Tokyo
www.fourseasons.com/marunouchi

There are only 57 rooms in this luxury boutique hotel in a skyscraper overlooking Ginza and Tokyo Station, each with floor-to-ceiling windows. There's nothing particularly Japanese about the decor, except for the stunning city views that serve as an ever-present backdrop. Ask for a room on the station side—on the highest floor possible—for a vertiginous view of Japan's famed bullet trains. The spa takes advantage of local culture with a stone bath and treatment rooms for Japanese scrubs and massage. The hotel also houses Ekki Bar & Grill, a contemporary American restaurant. The location's not bad, either: Marunouchi used to be strictly a business district, but in the last five years it has been transformed into a chic shopping and restaurant area.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Ginza Yoshimizu
3-11-3 Ginza
Chuo-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 3248 4432
rsv.ginza@yoshimizu.com
Metro: Ginza
www.yoshimizu.com

For a thoroughly Japanese experience in the center of Tokyo, try this 11-room eco-conscious inn. A rare find, it's located in a skinny nine-story building a short stroll from the department stores of Ginza. Shoes are removed at the door, and from then on there are no phones or refrigerators, and absolutely no televisions. The only sound is likely to be from Japanese musicians practicing in the studio below. Rooms all have shoji paper screens and tatami floors; futon mattresses are rolled out at night in typical Japanese fashion. Everything is organic here—from the Japanese breakfast to the cotton in the mattresses. Some rooms are en suite, but there are also two shared baths—a classic feature of a Japanese inn. This place is popular among the kabuki actors who perform in the nearby theater.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Grand Hyatt Tokyo
6-10-3 Roppongi
Minato-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 4333 1234
info@tyogh.com
Metro: Roppongi
tokyo.grand.hyatt.com

In the enormous, expat-focused Roppongi Hills development, this 390-room hotel with shops, restaurants, an art museum, and a multiscreen cinema has become a Tokyo attraction in itself. Standard rooms have all the mod cons—flat-screen TVs, DVD players, high-speed Internet access, plus unusually large bathrooms (with their own flat-screen consoles). Ask for a room facing west for stunning views of Mt. Fuji. The Nagomi Spa has treatment rooms, a gym, and a beautifully lit indoor stone swimming pool. Among the seven restaurants, the French Kitchen Brasserie & Bar serves a very popular weekend brunch, and the Maduro bar is a chic watering hole. Since the Grand Hyatt (not to be confused with the Park Hyatt) is a favorite for weddings and conferences, it's often completely booked. Reserve well in advance.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hilltop Hotel
1-1 Kanda Surugadai
Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 3293 2311
service@yamanoue-hotel.co.jp
Metro: Jimbocho
www.yamanoue-hotel.co.jp

The Yamanoue or Hilltop, in the university and bookshop district of Jimbocho, is a hotel with a history. The building, which dates back to 1937, served as quarters for officers of the U.S. Occupation Forces before being turned into a hotel in 1954. It quickly became a favorite with journalists and writers, including the novelist Yukio Mishima. The hotel still has a distinctly old-fashioned air, and the rooms are comfortably worn. Book a Japanese room in the main building, which combine Western beds with tatami floors and shoji screens. If that's not your style, try one of the ultramodern renovated rooms on the seventh floor of the annex. Many have old wooden desks and dressing tables, prints on the walls, and sofas with lace arm covers. Service is thoughtful and attentive—the staff even promises to pump fresh oxygen into your room. Tempura restaurant Yama-no-Ue is worth a visit even if you're not staying at this hotel.

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Homeikan
Honkan: 5-10-5 Hongo
Daimachi: 5-12-9 Hongo
Morikawa: 6-23-5 Hongo
Bunkyo-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 3811 1187
info@homeikan.com
Metro: Hongosanchome
www.homeikan.com

Homeikan is a traditional Japanese inn situated in three separate buildings (the 25-room Honkan, 31-room Daimachi, and 33-room Morikawa) in a quiet residential neighborhood near Tokyo University. The rooms are all Japanese-style (that is, with tatami mats and futon mattresses), either "ordinary" for budget travelers or the marginally more expensive "authentic and traditional." Opt for the latter. The main building, or Honkan, is listed as a historic property, while Daimachi Bekkan, across the street, is a former family home with its own Japanese garden. This is not like a Western hotel, so don't expect on-tap room service. The maids leave at 10 pm and the main lights go out at 10:30 pm, although guests are free to come and go. The staff, in fact, is helpful and hospitable. There are no private bathrooms; instead, each of the buildings has separate men's and women's baths, and there is also a family bath. Homeikan also offers massage services, as well as Japanese breakfasts and dinners on request. And free Internet access is now available in all buildings.—Updated by Rebecca Willa Davis

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Century Southern Tower
2-2-1 Yoyogi
Shibuya-ku
Tokyo
Japan 151-8583
Tel: 81 3 5354 0111
Fax: 81 3 5354 0100
Metro: Shinjuku
www.southerntower.co.jp/english/index.html

This hotel has long been a favorite among Tokyo visitors-in-the-know for its very convenient location—across the street from Shinjuku Station's south exit and the Narita Express (airport train) terminal—and for its breathtaking views without the usual sky-high rates. The 375 rooms are small and simply designed but comfortable. And while the hotel doesn't have a spa or fitness facility (unless you count its "fitness corner" with a few machines), its three restaurants—Japanese, Chinese, and European—serve good food (check out Tribeks for breakfast). The 23-story lobby with its sweeping views, café, bar, and free Wi-Fi is actually more inviting than those of many hip hotels. There's no room service, but there's a lobby convenience store and a Starbucks just outside—and just across the pedestrian footbridge are the Takashimaya department store's many restaurants.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hotel Niwa Tokyo
1-1-16 Misaki-cho
Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo
Japan 101-0061
Tel: 81 3 3293 0028
Fax: 81 3 3295 3328
Metro: Suidobashi
www.hotelniwa.jp

Hotel Niwa in central Tokyo takes the concept of a ryokan—with its appreciation for traditional craftsmanship and near obsession with service—and updates it to the needs of 21st-century travelers. As its name suggests (niwa means garden in Japanese), nature permeates all parts of the building, from the row of trees and bushes that acts as a buffer between the hotel and the street to the tatami mat–inspired carpets that cover room floors. While the 238 guest rooms are on the smaller side (ranging from 194 to 388 square feet), they're well equipped (from iron tea pots to generously proportioned desks to free Internet, a surprisingly hard perk to come by in the city) and then some (you can order in-room facial and body treatments with just the click of the TV remote control). There's one distraction the business travelers who flock here won't have to worry about: Earthquake-absorbing mechanisms in this seismically isolated building ensure a stable stay.—Rebecca Willa Davis

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hotel Okura Tokyo
2-10-4 Toranomon
Minato-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 3582 0111
gmoffice@tokyo.hotelokura.co.jp
Metro: Kamiyacho
www.okura.com/tokyo

No hotel lobby in Tokyo can match the elegance of the Okura's. Designed in 1962 by celebrated architect Yoshiro Taniguchi, the hotel is a glimpse into early '60s Japan, and it retains a resolutely old-style approach to hospitality. Close to business and government offices and next door to the U.S. Embassy, it struggles in the face of flashier newcomers but is still favored by visiting heads of state. While the public spaces remain delightfully unchanged, the accommodations on floors five through ten have been renovated over the years. Ask for one of the recently completed Grand Comfort rooms on the ninth floor of the main building, which will give you access to the Relaxation Nature Court spa. But the rooms are not why you stay here. It's for the traditional—and phenomenally efficient—service, for the excellent sushi and tempura bar, and for the sense of history. Have afternoon tea in the Orchid Bar if only to admire the pristine '60s interior, and enjoy a cigar from the walk-in humidor at Baron Okura, the bar named after the hotel's aristocratic founder. And don't overlook the fact that the hotel has its own art museum.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Hotel Seiyo Ginza
1-11-2 Ginza
Chuo-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 3535 1111
reservation@seiyo-ginza.co.jp
Metro: Ginza Itchome
www.seiyo-ginza.com

This discreet luxury hotel between Ginza and Nihonbashi was founded by Seiji Tsutsumi, a scion of a legendary business dynasty. It's easily overlooked, since the entrance is barely visible from street level, which is just the way its high-profile guests like it. The place is their little secret—their home away from home. The spacious (for Tokyo) 77 rooms come in neutral hues with a separate tub and shower in all bathrooms. Deluxe accommodations also have dressing rooms, and all have Wi-Fi. The hotel boasts a Michelin-starred sushi restaurant, Mao, designed by the well-known Kabuki actor Ebizô Ichikawa. But you don't have to be a boldface name to be treated famously. The level of service is exceptionally high: Knowledgeable concierges will arrange business and travel plans, and a 24-hour butler service takes care of everything from unpacking to laundry.—Updated by Rebecca Willa Davis

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Villa Fontaine Shiodome
1-9-2 Higashi Shimbashi
Minato-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 3569 2220
shio@villa-fontaine.co.jp
Metro: Shiodome
www.villa-fontaine.co.jp/eng/shiodome/index.html

A rate of 10,000 yen (about $85) for a single has ensured that this 497-room hotel, opened in August 2004, is always busy. Accommodations are simple but a vast improvement on the dreary boxes that pass for rooms in many regular Japanese business hotels. Roomy singles have queen-size beds; Premium Relaxation rooms come with king-size beds, sofa, and desk; "Healing Rooms" overlook the hotel's towering atrium and come with ionizing humidifiers, foot massage machines, and contour pillows. There's free high-speed Internet access throughout. And the hotel is one minute from Shiodome Station.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Imperial Hotel
1-1-1 Uchisaiwaicho
Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 3504 1111
Fax: 81 3 3581 9146
Metro: Uchisaiwaicho
www.imperialhotel.co.jp

Opened in 1890, the Imperial is a Tokyo classic and a firm favorite with Japanese visitors. At one time it was housed in a Frank Lloyd Wright building, but that was demolished and replaced by a modern block in 1970. The Imperial prides itself on its high standard of service, and is responding to the influx of foreign chains with a complete overhaul that will be finished by 2008. Book a room on one of the newly renovated Imperial Floors (the 14th, 15th, and 16th in the main building) for modern features like flat-screen TVs, free broadband, and mist-saunas (in some rooms). These floors also have their own kimono-clad guest attendants. The Old Imperial Bar retains elements of the original Wright building, while the freshly spruced up French restaurant, Les Saisons, is the lunch spot of choice for Japanese ladies. The new Frank Lloyd Wright Suite has staggering views of Hibiya Park and the Imperial Palace Gardens and rents for a tidy $3,500 per night.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
2-1-1 Nihonbashi Muromachi
Chuo-ku
Tokyo
Japan 103-8328
Tel: 81 3 3270 8800
motyo-reservations@mohg.com
Metro: Shin-Nihonbashi
www.mandarinoriental.com/tokyo

Despite its location in a jutting skyscraper near Tokyo Station and the original Mitsukoshi department store, Mandarin Oriental's first Japanese outpost (opened in December 2005) aspires to be a modern Zen paradise. Each of the 157 guest rooms and 21 suites is equipped with 450-thread-count Egyptian cotton sheets, a huge LCD television, and a surround-sound entertainment system that syncs with iPods and video cameras. Hallways are dramatically lit, and the interior design makes smart use of gorgeous custom fabrics. The spa offers relaxing treatments such as shiatsu and Ayurvedic massage, plus a steam room, sauna, and a series of pools. The overall effect is one of sophisticated calm, but the panoramic views of Tokyo and all its thrilling commotion—visible from Sushi Sora (an eight-seat restaurant that opened in April 2011), as well as every guest room, bath, and even the treatment rooms—are guaranteed to keep your pulse up.—Updated by Rebecca Willa Davis

$300-$399
Editor's Pick
Marunouchi Hotel
1-6-3 Marunouchi
Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 3215 2151
info@marunouchi-hotel.co.jp
Metro: Tokyo
www.marunouchi-hotel.co.jp

Four years after the old Marunouchi Hotel closed down, the new version opened in 2004 on the top floors of the Oazo building next to Tokyo Station. It's a very good value and an exceptionally convenient location, a stone's throw from the Narita Airport Express in the heart of a thriving business and shopping district. Built around an atrium in modern Japanese style, rooms are thoughtfully designed—quiet and modern, with soft lighting, muted colors, and—in some—a separate tatami area. If you can, stay on the Comfort Floors (15th, 16th, and 17th). Corner room 1614 is a winner, with a bird's-eye view over the station and Marunouchi. Breakfast is served at the Pomme d'Adam restaurant, which has a lovely outdoor terrace, but the notoriously strong winds might keep you inside.

$200-$299
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Park Hotel Tokyo
Shiodome Media Tower
1-7-1 Higashi Shimbashi
Minato-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 6252 1111
info@parkhoteltokyo.com
Metro: Shiodome
www.parkhoteltokyo.com

Located on the 25th floor of a skyscraper tower, this hotel, open since 2003, is in Shiodome, a new high-rise district close to Shimbashi and Ginza. The rooms are simple, with modern decor and floor-to-ceiling windows. In the ten-story atrium, there's a lobby bar and a selection of stylish restaurants including Hanasanshou, where superior Japanese food is served, using ingredients from a Kyoto farm. It has far more full-service amenities than other budget hotels in Tokyo: In-room massage is on offer until 2 a.m., and 24-hour room service is available for light meals.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Park Hyatt Tokyo
3-7-1-2 Nishi-Shinjuku
Shinjuku-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 5322 1234
mail@parkhyatttokyo.com
Metro: Shinjuku
tokyo.park.hyatt.com

Perched high above throbbing Shinjuku on the top floors of Kenzo Tange's 52-story steel and granite Park Tower, this has long been the hotel of choice for visiting celebrities (and so it was a natural location for Sofia Coppola to use in Lost in Translation). A small hotel by Tokyo standards—only 177 rooms—the Park Hyatt fairly drips with luxury. Rooms are large—all are at least 484 square feet—with low-key modern furnishings, deluxe bathrooms, and unbeatable views. There's a spectacular glass-roofed swimming pool on the 47th floor (where Bill Murray took a memorable dip in Coppola's movie), plus a revamped spa with sauna, plunge pool, and treatments rooms on the 45th. On a clear day, you can see Mount Fuji from the popular New York Grill on the top floor (reopened in September 2006 with additional seating and artwork by Minoru Nomata).

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
The Peninsula Tokyo
1-8-1 Yurakucho
Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 6270 2288
ptk@peninsula.com
Metro: Hibiya
tokyo.peninsula.com

The Peninsula is Tokyo's newest brand-name hotel, and the first freestanding one to be built here in at least a decade (the others are all perched on top of office towers or part of multiuse complexes). The big draw is its location across the street from the Imperial Palace and a short stroll from the center of Ginza. There are 314 guest rooms going up to the 24th floor, but be sure to nab a high one and be specific about a palace view, or you could end up staring at office buildings. The lovely guest rooms, in muted beiges and browns with understated Asian touches, are also Tokyo high-tech—there are buttons and gauges everywhere to control the lights, curtains, temperature, and humidity. And in what is fast becoming a world culinary capital, there's the Hei Fung Terrace—sister to the Peninsula's elegant Hong Kong Spring Moon Chinese restaurant, and the top floor's Peter restaurant, a French-influenced eatery (chef Patrice Martineau is a veteran of both London's Savoy Hotel and New York's Daniel)—in a multitiered space that curves and sails above the city's lights like the dining room on a great ocean liner. The spa and swimming-pool-with-a-view are terrific. The hotel's only obvious flaw is the lobby restaurant, where hotel guests must compete with hordes of lady shoppers for the Peninsula's legendary high tea.

$400 or more
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Ritz-Carlton, Tokyo
9-7-1 Akasaka
Minato-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 3423 8000
Fax: 81 3 3423 8001
Metro: Roppongi
www.ritzcarlton.com/en/Properties/Tokyo/Default.htm

The Ritz-Carlton has scored big with its first Tokyo property, located on the top floors of the city's highest building and luxury mall, Tokyo Midtown, in the Roppongi district. The 258 guest rooms are exceptionally comfortable, with every expected luxury and amenity (flat-screen TV, free Wi-Fi access); the furnishings and muted color schemes soothingly elegant; the views breathtaking (including those from the fitness center and pool); and the service impeccable. Spring for the Club Floor (53rd) for the best views in town. When it comes to eating, you'll be spoiled for choice. Besides the hotel's own French-influenced Azure 45, New American Towers Grill, and contemporary Japanese Hinokizaka (there's also a lounge menu and a deli), Tokyo Midtown has gathered some of the best international restaurants and food stores in Japan. Besides all the obvious reasons to stay (great rooms, celebrated Ritz-Carlton service), there's also the buzz factor: Tokyo Midtown is definitely hot. The only downside? The hotel charges its own guests an additional fee to use its spa facilities.—Updated by Rebecca Willa Davis

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Ryokan Asakusa Shigetsu
1-31-11 Asakusa
Taito-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 3843 2345
info@shigetsu.com
Metro: Asakusa
www.shigetsu.com

At this modern Japanese inn, located in historic Asakusa, the staff uniform is kimono. Guests have a choice of 16 Japanese-style rooms with tatami, futon mattresses, and a shared bath, or six en suite Western versions with beds. Both options gain you access to the traditional wooden tubs on the top floor, where at night there's a lovely view of Senso-ji, Asakusa's most famous temple. There are other touches that serve as reminders that, despite the Tokyo Sky Tree looming above, you are staying in the city's old town: Japanese roof tiles decorate the floor, origami cranes surround the register, cotton yukata robes are for sale in the lobby, and a traditional Japanese harpist serenades guests at a monthly concert.—Updated by Rebecca Willa Davis

$199 or less
Editor's Pick
Hotel Photo
Shibuya Granbell Hotel
15-17 Sakuragaoka-cho
Shibuya-ku
Tokyo
Japan
Tel: 81 3 5457 2681
info@granbellhotel.jp
Metro: Shibuya
www.granbellhotel.jp/index_e.html

Affordable boutique hotels are hard to come by in Tokyo, especially ones as artfully designed as the Granbell Hotel in Shibuya. A favorite of the Japanese media and fashion editors since its 2006 opening, this under-the-radar hotel has 114 simply adorned rooms—white platform beds, blond wood furniture with black accents—with many windows overlooking the neon mayhem of Shibuya (for the best views, book one of the terrace suites on the 13th floor). Don't be put off by first impressions—yes, the entrance is a little difficult to find and the reception and lobby lounge are narrow and uninspired, but the purple, moodily lit hallways upstairs feel like the corridors of an alien spacecraft. The guestrooms, all around 300 square feet, have a cool aesthetic, with gorgeous L-shaped granite tubs for a two-person soak, motorized curtains decorated with Edo period landscapes reimagined in Lichtenstein-style pointillism, and high-tech amenities (flat-screen televisions, CD/DVD players, even EP record players) presented as tastefully as the artwork on the walls. The Shibuya Granbell Hotel's biggest draw is its location: far enough away from the cartoon madness of downtown Shibuya for a good night's sleep, but close enough to stumble home after a night of karaoke.—Douglas Wright

Information may have changed since the date of publication. Please confirm details with individual establishments before planning your trip.